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Cora Fox

fantasy of the essential propriety of the wives who transgress social norms to manipulate interpersonal relations in the fictionalized community of Windsor. 4 Unlike other plays by Shakespeare, this one announces the politics of emotion in its title, suggesting that the characters of the wives are types, and their positive emotion—merriness, or mirth—defines their condition as wives as well as their belonging to Windsor, their ‘Windsorness’. The play participates explicitly in the cultural histories of happiness, and it

in Positive emotions in early modern literature and culture
Abstract only
Rob Boddice

relations that ‘great man’ narratives did not. For all the change, there was a risk that the history of emotions would become a mere sub-field, of little importance to the grander historiographical project. It seemed to risk being limited to the study of individuals, and, as we have seen, faced seemingly insurmountable territorial challenges from those sciences who laid a more obvious claim to the emotions as a field of study. Talking about feelings, from a certain point of view, meant missing the real stuff of history: namely, reason and action. This book has

in The history of emotions
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Richard Meek and Erin Sullivan

medical humoralism as a means of explaining mental and emotional processes, both those of Richard and early modern individuals more generally. For some recent critics of Renaissance literature and culture (and Shakespearian drama in particular), Richard’s comments might confirm the notion that humoral theory was the essential model for understanding the emotions in the period, rooting such phenomena in

in The Renaissance of emotion
Rob Boddice

Architecture of the emotions On the main floor of the Jewish Museum in Berlin there is a door to a void: a space enclosed by twenty-metre-high walls, but narrowly open to the elements at the top. I had been, in daytime, and stood in this structure, known as the Holocaust Tower. I had been unmoved, one of many in the space, looking upward and wondering what I was supposed to feel. Daniel Libeskind, the architect who designed the museum, himself claimed that such voids, of which there are various within the building, represent ‘that which can never

in The history of emotions
Rob Boddice

Emotionology The beginning of a substantial historiography of the history of emotions can be dated to Peter and Carol Stearns’ 1985 article in the American Historical Review . 1 The history of emotions, from this point on, was clearly about emotions in society. While more recent innovations have shifted focus to the individual, and the biocultural production of emotions in the individual, by and large the discipline of history has provided insights that locate individuals in meaningful company. When the Stearns began their work, they saw a

in The history of emotions
Hope, fear and time in Troilus and Cressida
Kai Wiegandt

their story is known to the audience. Because hope and fear are the only emotions directed exclusively towards the future – with happy anticipation, confidence and curiosity being derivatives of hope, and alarm, terror and dread being derivatives of fear 3 – this question can be asked in broader terms. What stance towards the future do hope and fear express if that future is known? And in contrast, what roles do hope and

in Love, history and emotion in Chaucer and Shakespeare
Clara Eroukhmanoff

Wetherell, I propose that starting with securitisation as a dynamic affective practice offers a productive ground for theorising the role of emotions and affect in securitisation studies, and avoids the usual deadlock between choosing either the discursive approaches to the study of emotions (let us call this ‘representational emotions research’) and the non-representational approaches (the study of movements, flows and affective atmospheres) which have sprung from the disciplines of geography and cultural studies. Securitisation as an affective practice also offers a way

in The securitisation of Islam
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Mary C. Flannery

and on another side by the possibility of violence, female shamefastness remains an unfinishable work-in-progress in medieval literature. Practice and the history of emotions Shamefastness is not an emotion, but is rather a disposition towards and susceptibility to shame: a state of vigilance that simultaneously guards one against shame and makes one more sensitive to it. Medieval literature reveals shamefastness to be a mandatory matter of practice for honourable women, something to be interiorized through reflection and

in Practising shame
Open Access (free)
Emotion, affect and the meaning of activism
Hilary Pilkington

7 ‘One big family’: emotion, affect and the meaning of activism Following discussion of the ideological dimensions of EDL activism (Chapters 4 and 5) and of the particular ‘injustice frame’ (Jasper, 1998: 398) of ‘second-class citizens’ underpinning the rationalised meanings attached to EDL activism (Chapter 6), attention turns here to the emotional and affective dimensions of activism. The recent rehabilitation of ‘the emotional’ in the field of social movement studies has led to a recognition that emotionality does not equate to irrationality (1998: 398) and

in Loud and proud
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The precariousness of positive emotions in Webster’s The Duchess of Malfi
Lalita Pandit Hogan

. Further, this process of unfolding can be read as a comment on the potency as well as the precariousness of positive emotion. Bosola's moral disgust at the brothers as rank and corrupt members of the nobility, expressed at the very beginning of the play in strong visceral terms, serves to create a boundary between him and them. In cognitive neuroscience moral disgust is specifically associated with removing oneself from untrustworthy people, 2 illustrated here in the way Bosola uses this affect to remove himself

in Positive emotions in early modern literature and culture