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Abstract only
Angela Lait

, 2002 : xv) In other words, the purpose of life-writing is that it enables authors and readers to self-examine in a way there is rarely time for in the daily busy-ness of the modern world. It also allows readers to evaluate another’s life, adding authentication by means of the author/character identification and the piquancy that comes from

in Telling tales
Emma Liggins

, now represented as a monstrous, overpowering figure, has to be challenged and the tantular rejected in order to set the home daughter free. Disjunctions emerge between the bored spinster heroine, trapped in domestic (often rural) space, and the confident public personae 118 Odd women? often adopted in women’s life-writing, chronicling fulfilment through war work abroad and suffrage activity. Novels by May Sinclair and F.M. Mayor, neither of whom fit neatly into existing accounts of modernist women’s writing, can be re-examined in terms of their queering of the

in Odd women?
Emma Liggins

lesbians typically ‘disturb the happy infrastructure of homes’,3 then life-writing allowed lesbians to reinscribe their own variations on heterosexual domestic organisation. Recent work on inter-war queer autobiography has noted its challenge to contem­ porary theories of inversion and, in Georgia Johnston’s words, its 164 Odd women? ‘attempt, through making private experience public, to move the lesbian figure out of the closet’.4 I demonstrate how the love letters of Sylvia Townsend Warner and Radclyffe Hall, which have received limited critical attention

in Odd women?
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Through everything
Nicholas Royle

writing calls for a different thinking of all the disciplines and lines between them – ‘biology’ (the study of ‘life’) and ‘history’ (so many his and her and other creatures’ stories) as much as ‘literary studies’, ‘theory’, ‘fiction’, ‘autobiography’, ‘life writing’. She invites us to draw them all otherwise. Scholars, cultural historians and bibliographers may continue to classify early texts such as ‘Fiction and Its Phantoms’ (1972), ‘Sorties’ (1975) and ‘The Laugh of the Medusa’ (1975) as ‘critical essays’, but the writing itself will always resist such

in Hélène Cixous
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Mark Robson

representation she or he creates. In the opening quotation from the preface above, Ro:Ba: stresses ‘care’ and ‘fidelitie’ in life-writing, but he seems uneasy with this obligation. Although keen to emphasise the value of the labour of life-writing (p. 10), he is equally keen to confess his unoriginality as a writer, claiming that: ‘the most part of this booke is none of my owne; I onely

in The sense of early modern writing
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Take time
Nicholas Royle

: Syrens, 1994). 24 Hélène Cixous and Mireille Calle-Gruber, Rootprints: Memory and Life Writing , trans. Eric Prenowitz (London: Routledge, 1997), 18. 25 Cixous, Three Steps on the Ladder of Writing , 124–5. 26 Cixous, Three Steps on the Ladder of Writing , 81. 27 Cixous, ‘Writing Blind’, 144. 28 Gilles Deleuze, ‘Hélène Cixous or Stroboscopic Writing’, trans. Martin McQuillan, in Reading Cixous Writing , ed. Martin McQuillan, special issue of Oxford Literary Review , 24 (2002), 204. 29 Jacques Derrida, H.C. for

in Hélène Cixous
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Lewis Carroll
Nicholas Royle

, Sovereignties in Question: The Poetics of Paul Celan , ed. Thomas Dutoit and Outi Pasanen (New York: Fordham University Press, 2005), 101. 12 Cixous, ‘The Play of Fiction’, 13. 13 Cixous, ‘The Play of Fiction’, 13. 14 Hélène Cixous and Mireille Calle-Gruber, Rootprints: Memory and Life Writing , trans. Eric Prenowitz (London: Routledge, 1997), 204. 15 Cixous and Calle-Gruber, Rootprints , 204. 16 Lewis Carroll, Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland and Through the Looking-Glass in Alice in Wonderland , ed. Donald J. Gray, 2nd edn

in Hélène Cixous
Emma Liggins

, Valerie Sanders has argued that ‘most Victorian women saw auto­ biography as a forbidden area, and deliberately situated themselves outside its formal parameters’, minimising their potential ‘defiance’ in order to attract readers of both sexes.40 Linda H. Peterson notes the tensions inherent in Victorian women’s life-writing, arguing that the popularity of the domestic memoir fostered the expectation that women would write as mothers, daughters and wives, ‘represent[ing] their lives in terms of “good” feminine plots’, though writers such as Cobbe and George Eliot self

in Odd women?
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Emma Liggins

, Henry James and E.M. Forster clearly responded in complex ways to political debates about singleness and marginality. Instead, an investigation of the development of ‘the feminist story’ which emerges from tracing the links between the recording, mediating and coding of women’s ‘feminine consciousness’ in their life-writing, and the diverse narrative strategies employed by a range of female authors to challenge the heterosexual plot, is more revealing of the tensions within the feminist movement and of what women felt to be ‘imaginable’ as they campaigned for change

in Odd women?
Peter W. Graham

especially Casti, whose Novelle galanti made him ‘long to go to Venice to see the manners so admirably described’,14 and Pulci, who had significantly influenced Beppo and with whom Byron pairs himself using Cardinal Wolsey’s phrase ‘Ego et Rex meus’ (‘I and my king’) in a letter describing the packet containing the first canto of Don Juan, Mazeppa and the ‘Ode on Venice’ that he has just posted to England.15 But if Mazeppa offers a geographical displacement of Byron’s Italianate modes of writing, it also displaces other matters linked to Byron’s life, writing and

in Byron and Italy