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Considerations and consequences
Thomas Sutherland

the ideological precepts by which they are informed and conditioned. Especially in an age of geographic information systems – wherein lies an increasingly stark disparity between the visual appearance of the map itself on one hand, and the numerical data that it claims to represent on the other – the parameters within which such representations are given, and the socio-political consequences of such ‘givenness’ must be analysed with intense scrutiny. Digital mapping gives us a world through the binding of quantitative information to a set of representational

in Time for mapping
Trevor Barnes

could be transformational. By carrying out original cartographic re-description, Bunge aimed in his work to break through the existing crust of cartographic convention, to create something brand new, to change the world for the better, to revolutionise it. To illustrate this argument, I work through three different phases of Bunge’s pragmatist cartographic re-description: his early work within spatial science on formal map transformations; his later work in black inner-city Detroit to produce community-based maps to effect political change; and his last substantive

in The power of pragmatism
Stavros Stavrides

Commoning architectures 27 2 Commoning architectures Contested common worlds and the role of architecture The role of public space in molding city politics has been extensively theorized and studied. The shaping of citizenship and the establishment of citizen rights have been connected to struggles over and in public space, as well as to discourses that problematize public space as a constituent element of public life. It would be accurate to say that public space has formed the terrain for crises of citizenship more often than it has provided the stable

in Common spaces of urban emancipation
Mark Pelling, Alejandro Barcena, Hayley Leck, Ibidun Adelekan, David Dodman, Hamadou Issaka, Cassidy Johnson, Mtafu Manda, Blessing Mberu, Ezebunwa Nwokocha, Emmanuel Osuteye, and Soumana Boubacar

dominant actors that can trigger a transition?’ and whether transition windows (e.g. political and institutional change) can be utilised to enhance equity and future risk reduction. In this chapter, we show how opportunities for transition arise through several channels, notably when organised civil society collaborates with the city government and other actors (Pelling et al., 2018 ). Citizen-led approaches for risk-related data collection have been shown to be critical for advancing early warning of hazard (Fraser et al., 2017 ; Pelling et al

in African cities and collaborative futures
Open Access (free)
City DNA, public health and a new urban imaginary
Michael Keith and Andreza Aruska de Souza Santos

-sector-driven sites of market testing to third-sector drives for citizen empowerment through open data to partnership structures of city government and urban stakeholders. Geographies of different approaches reflect different national political cultures. So the Scandinavian stakeholder partnership laboratories of Helsinki and Copenhagen differ significantly from the state-driven natural experiments increasingly deployed in neoclassical economics-driven research, the randomised control tests of medical work or the attempts to harvest even the most basic data on cities dominated by

in Urban transformations and public health in the emergent city
Open Access (free)
Urban transformation and public health in future cities
Michael Keith and Andreza Aruska de Souza Santos

The air we breathe, the climate we share with others and the streets we walk down in the city where we might work and live are all just some of the many forms of urban commons . Like all commons they foreground the tensions between social demands that are shared by large numbers and particular rights that might be exercised by individuals, minorities and majorities. Conceptually, the notion of the city commons spans scholarly traditions. They range from empirically oriented political science to strands of critical urban studies informed by Deleuzian and

in Urban transformations and public health in the emergent city
Going beyond a communicative approach 
Ihnji Jon

). Radical planners acknowledge the plurality of the social and many of them draw on Chantal Mouffe’s (1999) writings on agonism. Mouffe argues that honouring the existence of conflicts or agons is essential for plural democracy as such conflicts signal the limits of politics done in the name of ‘the’ public. As Laclau and Mouffe (1985 [2000] , 192) argue: “there is no radical and plural democracy without renouncing the discourse of the universal and its implicit assumption of a privileged point of access to ‘the truth’, which can be reached only by a limited number

in The power of pragmatism
Clive Barnett

, Chapter 9 ); and in networks of professional expertise ( Chapter 12 , Chapter 13 ). The second theme running across The power of pragmatism is a political imperative, reflected in discussions of various methodologies of assertively engaged and experimental social research (e.g. Chapter 5 , Chapter 9 , Chapter 11 ). The consistent emphasis is upon not treating people as mere data points, but as active participants in a work of collective inquiry. It is this inclusive ethos that is also taken to be central to the democratic credentials of Pragmatism (e.g. Chapter

in The power of pragmatism
Abstract only
Stavros Stavrides

to secure a pure potentiality that does not pass over into ­actuality” (Brown 2013: 174). “We need to think man … as a being of pure potentiality (potenza) that no identity and no work could exhaust” (Agamben 2014: 69). Pure potentiality becomes the power of means, the power of 1­ 6 Common spaces of urban emancipation mediality, once it is released from its necessary connection to specific social ends, or, more specifically, once it is released from actuality as potentiality’s necessary outcome. Politics becomes, for Agamben, “the sphere of pure means” (2000

in Common spaces of urban emancipation
Testimonies of survival and rescue at Europe’s border
Karina Horsti and Ilaria Tucci

(Alexievich, 2017 ). Such work of listening, we argue, is a critical means of producing knowledge on the humanity of disasters at the border. Listening is not the only mode: seeing, being in places and doing things with those who have survived the border are equally significant ways of gaining embodied and situated knowledge. Seeing border deaths for what they are is obstructed because they appear as accidents, while, in fact, they are disasters that have been produced: they are results of a combination of political, structural, social and individual action and inaction

in Border images, border narratives