Search results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 15 items for :

  • Film, Media and Music x
  • All content x
Clear All
Abstract only
Making sense of conflict
Kirsten Forkert, Federico Oliveri, Gargi Bhattacharyya, and Janna Graham

the dangers of rejecting global inter-connectedness, as in their responses to the question ‘What concerns you most about global conflicts?’ Comments from both UK and Italian respondents suggested that despite dominant media representations which present people outside the West as distant ‘others’, global conflicts might be closer than we might think and might pose an immediate threat to Europe: Although no war has happened in Europe I fear it could spread soon enough, and with recent developments such as the appointment of president-elect Trump and Brexit, the so

in How media and conflicts make migrants
Abstract only
How it feels to be made a migrant: restrictions, frustration and longing
Kirsten Forkert, Federico Oliveri, Gargi Bhattacharyya, and Janna Graham

– as one of the participants says, ‘you are in a prison but not in a prison’ (Group discussion, 22 May 2017). The fourth image (Figure 4) is of someone who is frightened; the police are watching but not doing anything to help. It was in response to a discussion of one of the interview quotes where the interviewee tells a story (discussed in detail in the following chapter) about his rubbish bins being vandalised the day after the Brexit vote, and the police told him that nothing could be done; he saw this lack of action as a exemplifying institutionalised racism in

in How media and conflicts make migrants
Abstract only
Sarita Malik and Darrell M. Newton

nation. These seismic developments have coincided in the 2000s with a strong retreat from multiculturalism, a new discourse of global terrorism and terror/­securitisation agenda, and a highly charged political climate wherever it touches on questions of racial and, increasingly, religious difference.17 The ascent of Donald Trump to the US presidency in November 2016, just weeks after the ‘Brexit’ vote in June has highlighted new political commonalities hinged on new modes of nationalism and anti-immigration sentiment. Both of these events are of deep significance

in Adjusting the contrast
Abstract only
Unsettling dominant narratives about migration in a time of flux
Kirsten Forkert, Federico Oliveri, Gargi Bhattacharyya, and Janna Graham

. The UK has seen the Brexit vote and, in its aftermath, increasingly divisive politics, within which anti-immigrant views have played a central role. In 2018, the mechanisms of the hostile environment caused a number of British citizens of former colonies to be detained, made destitute and, in some cases, deported (in what became termed the ‘Windrush Scandal’ 1) – underlining that even British citizenship offers no protection against the techniques of migrantification. In Italy, the election of the right-wing government was in part due to distrust in how the asylum

in How media and conflicts make migrants
Abstract only
Good evening, all
Ben Lamb

and education to health, consumption, and leisure’ at the expense of working-class characters (Walker and Roberts 2017 a: 3). The repeated practice of pathologising the working class for being inherently backward within the social, political, and cultural discourse of western democracy heavily contributed to the Brexit vote, and Donald Trump’s presidential campaign across the Atlantic, as people had begun to feel left behind by

in You’re nicked
Abstract only
Conflict, media and displacement in the twenty-first century
Kirsten Forkert, Federico Oliveri, Gargi Bhattacharyya, and Janna Graham

disaffection with mainstream politics. Both have faced internal political controversy in response to population movement in the wake of conflict. In both countries, concerns about the role and efficacy of European institutions have converged with debates about borders and sovereignty. In the UK, this is exemplified by the Brexit vote and the mobilisation of xenophobia by the campaign to leave the EU, and in Italy by the anti-asylum and anti-NGO policies of the right-wing coalition government and especially of the Eurosceptic, far-right former Deputy Prime Minister and

in How media and conflicts make migrants
Abstract only
The ‘metropole’ and peripheral ‘others’
Chris Beasley and Heather Brook

effects of economic globalisation are no doubt familiar. In the aftermath of the 9/11 terrorist attacks, the Occupy Movement, Brexit, and the rise of national political and economic protectionism in many parts of the world, a number of commentators have predicted an end to increasing worldwide interconnectedness (Saul, 2005; Rosenberg, 2005; Verrender, 2016). However, any single or straightforward answer regarding the future of globalisation remains elusive. David Harvey, for example, discerns a complex and continuing tension between the logics of power associated with

in The cultural politics of contemporary Hollywood film
An introduction
Colin Coulter

call for the various additional forms of dirty money that will potentially be lured to the City in the aftermath of Brexit. 24 WORKING FOR THE CLAMPDOWN ‘I’m hearing music from another time’ The ways in which the culture industries have come to venerate and commemorate The Clash have left us, then, with a distorted recollection of the band, one that serves, predictably, to deflect and defuse their radical politics. That this is so should perhaps give pause for thought for those involved in a project such as this one. There is, after all, at least the chance that

in Working for the clampdown
Abstract only
London’s sonic space
Caspar Melville

disallowing the idea of universal values, which are taken to breach the requirement to respect cultural difference. The events of 11 September 2001 in New York (‘9/11’) and the threat of fundamentalist Islamic terror it announced to the world lent a h ­ ysterical tone to debates over multiculturalism, pivoting around the fears over the incompatibility of Islam and the West, over unchecked immigration (of which the Brexit vote of 2016 was only the most obvious articulation) and a concomitant sense that multicultural policies had been responsible for enabling the rise of

in It’s a London thing
Creativity, experimentation and innovation
Paul Newland and Brian Hoyle

film-makers such as Mike Leigh, Derek Jarman, Peter Greenaway, Sally Potter and Terence Davies would not have been able to sustain their careers were it not for support from the Continent; and one must wonder if they will be able to continue benefiting from this investment after ‘Brexit’. As the contributors to British art cinema: Creativity, experimentation and innovation demonstrate, ‘British art cinema’ comprises competing and fragmentary discourses. It is the purpose of this book to demonstrate that the concept of a British art cinema

in British art cinema