Search results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 14 items for :

  • "Capitalism" x
  • Archaeology and Heritage x
  • All content x
Clear All
Abstract only
The widening gyre
Catherine J. Frieman

death on a previously unimaginable scale. The falcon – new technologies and sciences, in this instance – certainly seemed to have flown out of earshot of its falconer. It was during these same interwar years that economist Joseph Schumpeter began forming the theories of entrepreneurship, capitalism, and the business cycle that have become core texts in our innovation discourse. Erwin Dekker ( 2018 ) positions Schumpeter as a member of the avant garde : a Futurist fascinated by the dynamism and possibilities of radical technological change but rendered pessimistic

in An archaeology of innovation
Art, process, archaeology

This book presents a study of material images and asks how an appreciation of the making and unfolding of images and art alters archaeological accounts of prehistoric and historic societies. With contributions focusing on case studies including prehistoric Britain, Scandinavia, Iberia, the Americas and Dynastic Egypt, and including contemporary reflections on material images, it makes a novel contribution to ongoing debates relating to archaeological art and images. The book offers a New Materialist analysis of archaeological imagery, with an emphasis on considering the material character of images and their making and unfolding. The book reassesses the predominantly representational paradigm of archaeological image analysis and argues for the importance of considering the ontology of images. It considers images as processes or events and introduces the verb ‘imaging’ to underline the point that images are conditions of possibility that draw together differing aspects of the world. The book is divided into three sections: ‘Emergent images’, which focuses on practices of making; ‘Images as process’, which examines the making and role of images in prehistoric societies; and ‘Unfolding images’, which focuses on how images change as they are made and circulated. The book features contributions from archaeologists, Egyptologists, anthropologists and artists. The contributors to the book highlight the multiple role of images in prehistoric and historic societies, demonstrating that archaeologists need to recognise the dynamic and changeable character of images.

Open Access (free)
Jes Wienberg

decay and ruin has followed the cycles of car production (e.g. www.camilojosevergara.com). Here the concrete remains of Benjamin’s “storm” and Schumpeter’s “creative destruction” are used as moral reminders of the failures of progress, of the impermanence of modernity and ideologies, and of the consequences of capitalism and neoliberalism. This field with its doom-laden book titles demonstrates a neo-Romantic fascination with decay which is quite as intense as the romantic notions about ruins that were rife in the nineteenth century. And at the heart of the field

in Heritopia
Post-connoisseurial dystopia and the profusion of things
Sharon Macdonald and Jennie Morgan

spatially universal. In many 39 40 Europe ways, this is a utopian worldview; it is a hope for an impossible form of collecting. This impossibility is in part a function of economistic ways of looking at collections, which may be part of a new spirit of capitalism that financialises everything.34 This way of seeing regards utopian, ubiquitous collecting as simply too expensive. And what is deemed too expensive is also, in this particular logic, regarded as irrational. Yet what we have heard in curators’ own words, and seen in their struggles to tidy their desks and

in Curatopia
Catherine J. Frieman

from the social sciences and framed by the short history of capitalism form the core of this discourse; and many archaeologists, whose material often derives from far earlier periods or regions largely unaffected (at least at the outset) by capitalist relations or industrial production, draw on it relatively uncritically. I start by examining the impact of applying a historic, Eurocentric model of innovation to non-Europeans, in this case Aboriginal people from Iutruwita (Tasmania) and their society. This case study allows me to draw out the innately political core

in An archaeology of innovation
James Clifford

vision, on days when the glass seems half-full. But it is far from guaranteed. Post-ethnological museums face serious obstacles. They struggle to resist powerful pressures for purification, for uncomplicated messages, for a return to simpler times. Post-ethnological museums, in Europe and North America, aspire, in their different national contexts, to transcend colonial pasts. But they have limited room to manoeuvre, constrained as they are by funding cuts, neo-liberal governments and marketing, all structural features of contemporary capitalism. There is also a

in Curatopia
Abstract only
Ing-Marie Back Danielsson and Andrew Meirion Jones

. Deleuze, G. and Guattari, F. (1987). A Thousand Plateaus: Capitalism and Schizophrenia. London: Continuum. Derrida, J. (1993). The Postcard. Chicago, IL: Chicago University Press. Elkins, J. (2011). What Photography Is. London: Routledge. Gell, A. (1998). Art and agency: An Anthropological Theory. Oxford: Clarendon. Gosden, C. and L. Malafouris. (2015). ‘Process Archaeology (P-Arch)’, World Archaeology 47 (5), 701–17. Harris, O.J.T. and T.F. Sørensen. (2010). ‘Rethinking emotion and material culture’, Archaeological Dialogues 17 (2), 145–63. Holbraad, M. and M

in Images in the making
Abstract only
Iron Age ‘kintsugi’ from East Yorkshire
Helen Chittock

University Press. Deleuze, G. and F. Guattari. (1987). A Thousand Plateaus: Capitalism and Schizophrenia, Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press. Dent, J.S. (1985). ‘Three chariot burials from Wetwang, Yorkshire’, Antiquity 59, 85–92. Evans, D.H. (2006). ‘Celtic art revealed: the South Cave weapons hoard’, Current Archaeology 203 (May/June), 572–7. Evans, D.H., R. George, K. Anderson, E. Cameron, P. Didsbury, A. Doherty, E. Goodman, M. Marshall, P. Northover and S. O’Connor. (in prep.). A First Century AD Weapon Hoard from South Cave, East Riding of Yorkshire. Garrow

in Images in the making
Scandinavian Late Iron Age gold foil figures through the lens of intra-action
Ing-Marie Back Danielsson

Materials: Substantial Transformations in Early Prehistoric Europe. London: Routledge. DeLanda, M. (2006). A New Philosophy of Society: Assemblage Theory and Social Complexity. London and New York: Continuum. Deleuze, G. and F. Guattari. (1988). A Thousand Plateaus: Capitalism and Schizophrenia. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press. Derrida, J. (1994). Specters of Marx: The State of the Debt, the Work of Mourning, & the New International, trans. by Peggy Kamuf. New York: Routledge. Dolphijn, R. and I. van der Tuin. (2012). New Materialism: Interviews & Cartographies

in Images in the making
Fredrik Fahlander

Objects in the Prehistory of South-eastern Europe. London: Routledge. Coles, J. (2000). Patterns in a Rocky Land: Rock Carvings In South-west Uppland. Aun no: 0284–1347; 27. Uppsala: Uppsala University. Deleuze, G. (2003). Francis Bacon: The Logic of Sensation. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press. Deleuze, G. and F. Guattari. (1993). A Thousand Plateaus: Capitalism and Schizophrenia. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press. Fahlander, F. (2008). ‘Differences that matter: materialities, material culture and social practice’, in H. Glørstad and L. Hedeager (eds

in Images in the making