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Global days of action and photographs of resistance
Antigoni Memou

6 Carnival Against Capitalism: global days of action and photographs of resistance C a r n i va l s A g a i n s t C a p i t a l were mounted on numerous Global Days of Action in the late 1990s, signalling the emergence of a movement against neoliberal globalisation and for global justice. The first global street party was called on 16 May (M16) 1998 by London Reclaim the Streets (RTS) and the newly founded People’s Global Action (PGA) to coincide with the G8 summit in Birmingham and the following week’s WTO ministerial meeting in Geneva. Over thirty street

in Photography and social movements
Simon Skinner

That hostility to the Reformation was a feature of the Oxford Movements outlook is a truism, but Tractarians’ anti-Reformation sentiments went much further than the purely theological. Tractarians consistently held that in its repudiation of antiquity and elevation of sola scriptura, the Reformation had launched a wider rationalism whose socio-economic as well as religious consequences they abhorred. If a Tractarian paternalism – which mourned the welfare consequences of the dissolution of the monasteries, and the rise of capitalism and its bourgeoisie,– had much in common with other nineteenth-century social criticism, a crucial difference emerged at the point of prescription. Their uncompromising advocacy of the church as the sole agency of amelioration, and promotion of such schemes as sisterhoods, sharply distinguished Tractarians,from advocates of legislative intervention or ethical socialism. Tractarians therefore looked not forward, to the ideal of a welfare state, but back, to the ideal of a welfare church.

Bulletin of the John Rylands Library
The politics of trans/nationalism and global expositions

Staging art and Chineseness is about the politics of borders ascribed to Chinese contemporary art and the identification of artists by locations and exhibitions. The paradoxical subject of Chineseness is central to this inquiry, which begins with the question, what does the term Chinese Art mean in the aftermath of the globalized shift in art? Through an exploration of embodied and performative representations (including eco-feminist performances) by artists from China and diasporic locations, the case studies in this book put to the test the very premise of the genealogical inscription for cultural objects attributed to the residency, homeland, or citizenship of the Chinese artist. Acknowledging the orientalist assumptions and appropriations that Chineseness also signifies, this study connects the artistic performance to the greater historical scope of ‘geographical consciousness’ envisioned by past and present global expositions. The emergence of China’s shiyan meishu experimental art movement in the 1980s–1990s has largely been the defining focus for ‘global art’ during the period when artfairs, biennials, and triennials also came into prominence as the new globalized art institution (exemplified by China’s first biennial in Guangzhou). The political aim is to recognize the multiple contradictions and repetitions of history engendered by art, nationalism, and capital in the legacy of Althusserian/Maoist interpellations – the reifications of global capitalist illusions in the twenty-first century are conveyed in this book by performative artistic expressions and the temporal space of the exposition.

Abstract only
Marc James Léger

In his critique of institutions and the desire of radicalised artists and theorists to work outside the limits of established disciplinary structures, Brian Holmes argues that discourse-based context art and institutional critique have undergone a significant phase change, a shift towards extradisciplinary, transversal assemblages that link actors from the art world to projects oriented towards political contestation. 1 The world in which networked art activists operate today is characterised as ‘cognitive capitalism,’ a new global

in Vanguardia
Marc James Léger

-consumers. The encampments and their various forms signal a rage that needs no other justification than the perspective of organised resistance that it brings into view. In an earlier historical conjuncture, the commons was referred to in a more general sense as ‘everyday life’ within modernity. In our own times, modernity reads more specifically as globalisation. For all of the changes in automation and information technologies, the features of modernity in late capitalism remain largely the same. Everyday life is alienated and social

in Vanguardia
Anna Dezeuze

Futility and precarity Liquid capitalism’s new ‘lightness and motility’, argued Zygmunt Bauman in 2000, ‘have turned into the paramount source of uncertainty for all the rest’.1 Indeed, capitalism’s short-term tactics of mobility and evasion have been systematically accompanied since the 1980s by strategies of downsizing and outsourcing that have radically transformed the very definitions of work and society. Terms such as ‘flexploitation’ and ‘precarisation’ were coined in the late 1990s to describe the new uncertain status of work within this new global

in Almost nothing
Anna Dezeuze

negative value of junk, in much the same way as Beat author Jack Kerouac could exclaim: ‘I love it because it’s ugly.’5 The precariousness of the junk aesthetic, I will argue, lies in such varyingly and variously dynamic relations between art and trash, as they operate through the artists’ choices of materials and their modes of assemblage. The politics of such precarious practices emerge in their interactions with the social critiques concerning the place of the subject in late 1950s and early 1960s capitalism. In particular, I will suggest that the individual’s life

in Almost nothing
Anna Dezeuze

’, according to Foster, while Isa Genzken’s precarious works (which were also included in Unmonumental) tended to be ‘desperate’.32 Like Bourriaud, who considered ‘precariousness’ to be a reflection of the global expansion of capitalism, Foster related the increased visibility of such precarious practices to the 2008 collapse of the ‘financial house of cards’ which had been the culmination of the ongoing ‘charge of neoliberalism’ begun in the 1980s.33 Furthermore, Foster also accounted for the artists’ sense of ‘heightened insecurity’ in the light of global political events

in Almost nothing
Abstract only
Antigoni Memou

their social composition, organisation and direct demands. The enthusiastic calls for democracy, justice and human rights and the broad attack on capitalism, its injustices and inequalities can been found in both movements. Furthermore, a loose decentralised organisation, a lack of strict leadership, a rejection of authoritarianism and any kind of hierarchy signalled a rupture with the old forms of organisation. These principles were put into practice in anti-hierarchical assemblies in the occupied Sorbonne in 1968 as well as in the Zapatistas ‘Encuentros’ and the

in Photography and social movements
Colette Gaiter

resistance against Western imperialism and 5 88 Art, Global Maoism and the Cultural Revolution capitalism to people across the world and created a ‘global village’ of dissent.3 Posters were cheap, accessible, simple and direct, usually combining motivational images and text. Since the Black Panthers pasted posters on empty outdoor walls in black communities, readers did not have to leave their neighbourhoods to see them and, for twenty-five cents, could buy a copy of the Black Panther and put its back-page poster on their own walls. Douglas’s work was a kind of Pop art

in Art, Global Maoism and the Chinese Cultural Revolution