Search results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 10 items for :

  • Art, Architecture and Visual Culture x
  • All content x
Clear All
Nicky Coutts

Vets have a tendency towards suicide. Or so Hélène Cixous proposes recounting seven vets who took their own lives over just a three-year period in her local area. 1 In notebooks, not originally intended for distribution, she tells the story of how the dark hair of a 35-year-old vet turned to white overnight following the violent suicide of his

in Perspectives on contemporary printmaking
Kimberly Lamm

Writing the drives in Nancy Spero’s Codex Artaud Her letters-drawings have an address, harangue and apostrophise the passers-by violently. Hélène Cixous, ‘Spero’s Dissidences’1 It is the scale of Codex Artaud that first announces its claim to aggression. Akin to a colossal frieze, Codex Artaud consists of thirty-three large format collage panels that Spero composed to extend across and around museum or gallery walls. The extreme proportional disparities among the individual collages (some are two feet high and ten feet long and others are eleven feet high and

in Addressing the other woman
Rethinking art, media, and the audio-visual contract
Author: Ming-Yuen S. Ma

There is no soundtrack is a specific yet expansive study of sound tactics deployed in experimental media art today. It analyses how audio and visual elements interact and produce meaning, drawing from works by contemporary media artists ranging from Chantal Akerman, to Nam June Paik, to Tanya Tagaq. It then links these analyses to discussions on silence, voice, noise, listening, the soundscape, and other key ideas in sound studies. In making these connections, the book argues that experimental media art – avant-garde film, video art, performance, installation, and hybrid forms – produces radical and new audio-visual relationships that challenge and destabilize the visually-dominated fields of art history, contemporary art criticism, cinema and media studies, and cultural studies as well as the larger area of the human sciences. This book directly addresses what sound studies scholar Jonathan Sterne calls ‘visual hegemony’. It joins a growing body of interdisciplinary scholarship that is collectively sonifying the study of culture while defying the lack of diversity within the field by focusing on practitioners from transnational and diverse backgrounds. Therefore, the media artists discussed in this book are of interest to scholars and students who are exploring aurality in related disciplines including gender and feminist studies, queer studies, ethnic studies, postcolonial studies, urban studies, environmental analysis, and architecture. As such, There Is No Soundtrack makes meaningful connections between previously disconnected bodies of scholarship to build new, more complex and reverberating frameworks for the study of art, media, and sound.

Ruth Pelzer-Montada

other technologies. Ingeniously linking French suicidal vets, Saint Anthony, Padre Pio – a twentieth-century Catholic saint – and Hillary Clinton, as well as citing such diverse thinkers as Hélène Cixous, Elias Canetti, Walter Benjamin, Gustave Flaubert and Hito Steyerl, Coutts diagnoses our loss – through reproductive technologies – of a fixed and stable physical location as a

in Perspectives on contemporary printmaking
Abstract only
Addressing the other woman
Kimberly Lamm

around fundamental absences, which undercuts the prestige of presence bestowed upon speech. The work of Jacques Derrida and Hélène Cixous stands out for their attention to writing as a confrontation with the gaps and absences at the heart of signification. Whether women artists drew explicitly from deconstruction or not, the movement between presence and absence enacted through writing challenged the fantasmatic presence attributed to the sign woman (which is paradoxically premised on her absence and lack) and the punitive absences that have awaited women outside its

in Addressing the other woman
Abstract only
Mechthild Fend

Skin Ego [1985], trans. Chris Turner (New Haven; London: Yale University Press, 1989), p. 210. 4 Laura Marks, The Skin of the Film: Intercultural Cinema, Embodiment, and the Senses (Durham/N.C.; London: Duke University Press, 2000). 5 Elizabeth D. Harvey, ‘The touching organ: allegory, anatomy, and the Renaissance skin envelope’, in Elizabeth D. Harvey (ed.), Sensible Flesh: On Touch in Early Modern Culture (Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2003), pp. 81–102 (p. 85). 6 Jacques Derrida, ‘A silkworm of one’s own’, in Hélène Cixous and Jacques

in Fleshing out surfaces
Anne Ring Petersen

vision and imagery.73 Laying ownership to and toying with it is also what Banerjee does with the Orient as a Western system of representation in which the East is often conceived of as the inferior, sensual and eccentric Other, displaying a feminine penetrability while passively awaiting conquest by a masculine West.74 In a noteworthy comparison, Laura Steward has likened Banerjee’s way of expressing herself to the feminist writing or écriture féminine (‘women’s writing’) of Hélène Cixous and Julia Kristeva. As protagonists of a strand of feminist theory that

in Migration into art
Catherine Spencer

Is Not One , trans. Catherine Porter with Carolyn Burke ( Ithaca, NY : Cornell University Press , 1985 [1977] ), 28 . 144   As exemplified by Hélène Cixous in ‘The Laugh of the Medusa’ (1975), which asserts of woman that: ‘there is always within her at least a little of that good mother’s milk. She writes in white ink.’ Hélène Cixous , ‘ The Laugh of the Medusa ’, trans. Keith Cohen and Paula Cohen , Signs 1 , no. 4 (Summer 1976 ): 875–93 ( 881 ). 145   ‘Woman’, Beauvoir stated, ‘is not a completed reality, but rather a becoming

in Beyond the Happening
Abstract only
Voiceover, autoethnography, performativity
Ming-Yuen S. Ma

of subject formation in the ‘mirror phase’. He writes: ‘the auto-affective voice of selfpresence and self-mastery was constantly opposed by its reverse side, the intractable voice of the other, the voice one could not control’.14 French feminists, including Hélène Cixous and Luce Irigaray, theorize a form of feminine writing (écriture féminine) that incorporates women’s vocality, referencing key ideas in Freudian and Lacanian psychoanalysis while resisting their patriarchal paradigms. Some of these ideas became very influential in the interdisciplinary work done by

in There is no soundtrack
Christian Marclay’s Guitar Drag
Ming-Yuen S. Ma

silent. She speaks after, she depends on others’ discourses and becomes merely their echo.’ 16 Of course, Echo’s most famous case of vocal resonance is with Narcissus. Thus her ‘tragedy’ of only repeating what others say takes on a gendered power dynamic. Yet, working through the feminine writing (Écriture feminine) of Hélène Cixous, Cavarero argues that Echo’s vocal repetition can be a source of pleasure, as opposed to tragedy: This pleasure in vocal repetition is not even perceived as compulsive; rather, by evading the semantic, it rediscovers a time in which such

in There is no soundtrack