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Open Access (free)
John Narayan

1 Creative Democracy Optimism about democracy is today under a cloud. (LW2: 304) Unfashionable democracy When Dewey published The Public and Its Problems in 1927, democracy had become somewhat of an unfashionable aspiration, with populations in Europe beginning to turn to the extreme Left and Right for their political settlements. In Russia the October Revolution was nearly ten years old, in Italy Mussolini had been in power for three years and in Germany both volumes of Mein Kampf had been published. At home in the United States of America, even the pretence

in John Dewey
Jack Mapanje

9780719079740_C06.qxd 6 22/2/10 15:33 Page 127 Jack Mapanje Creative incarceration and strategies for surviving freedom The delights of moving house For what it’s worth, I want to tell you the story of how my family and I have been surviving our freedom since we arrived in the UK. I was adopted as a prisoner of conscience by Amnesty International, Pen International, Africa Watch, Human Rights Watch, and many other associations and organisations of writers, linguists, scholars and human rights activists throughout the world – the list is limitless – and it

in Incarceration and human rights
John Narayan

3 The Obstacles to Creative Democracy at Home and Abroad Only sheer cynicism and defeatism will deny that it is possible to create a workable world government. There have been times when the moral ancestors of present day defeatists would have scornfully declared that a rule of law over a territory anything like as large as our present United States was impossible. They would have said that outside of family groups and small neighbourhoods, the custom of every man’s hand against other men could not be uprooted … If peoples, especially their rulers, devoted

in John Dewey
Managing the criminal facets of war economies
Jenny H. Peterson

financial crime is indeed having a positive impact on that area. However, this strategy of singleissue funding leaves gaps in the system which allow for continued evasion by criminal elements. Narrowly defined projects may be palatable to national constituencies, but on the ground they result in risk-averse, blueprint policies as opposed to innovative and creative programming. The DSI in its current formulation does not always allow for flexibility or creativity in its approach, two characteristics which are needed for building new and stable institutions to respond to

in Building a peace economy?
The nature of the development-security industry
Jenny H. Peterson

to a preference for short-term, quick-fix projects which means that in highly complex situations such as conflict and post-war environments, there is little time for serious conflict analysis (Collinson et al., 2003). The combined pressures of competition, demands for quick quantifiable results and the danger of working in conflict-affected environments also leads to agencies becoming extremely risk averse – not undertaking progressive, creative or unique programming (Christpolos, Mitchell and Liljelund, 2001; Goodhand, 2001; Montani and Majid, 2002). Associated

in Building a peace economy?
DSI approaches and behaviours
Jenny H. Peterson

key institutions such as the Ministry of Interior and Ministry of Justice. Finally, resource changes will also shape the degree to which international actors engage with politics, although their effect can be varied. A decrease in resources may force international actors to rely more heavily on local actors, increasing the possibility of engaging in or being influenced by contextual factors, but might also result in the DSI actors choosing more simplistic blueprint-type policies as fewer resources decrease the possibility of creating complex, creative or sustainable

in Building a peace economy?
Open Access (free)
Brad Evans

life and live out the fascistic dream. That doesn’t mean to say the threat of violence ever truly dissipates from the relationship. Once the power over life is normalised, the spectre of violence is in fact omnipresent. It has to be that way or else the still existent capacity to resist might result in a reversal of fortunes. In the absence of violence there is an absence of fear. And in the absence of fear life can live affirmatively, creatively, resistively in the primary and ontological sense of these terms, with all the public and joyful expressions of difference

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Architecture, Building and Humanitarian Innovation
Tom Scott-Smith

and a tight timeframe, yet they managed to respond creatively to the peculiar situation in Vienna, where huge empty office buildings had been allocated to shelter new asylum seekers during the ‘summer of migration’ in 2015. The architects had focused on adding simple furnishings that created a more homely environment, articulating a careful, human-centred approach that had interpreted shelter not as four walls and a roof but as a calming and secure internal space. The aim

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Paul Currion

have. This is not a problem until a situation arises which presents an existential threat and a paradigm shift is required purely for survival, which was of course the rationale that the original ALNAP study gave for innovation. This rationale draws on the idea of creative destruction, the phrase coined by Joseph Schumpeter to describe how the ‘fundamental impulse that sets and keeps the capitalist engine in motion comes from the new consumers’ goods, the new methods of production or transportation

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
The Law and Politics of Responding to Attacks against Aid Workers
Julia Brooks and Rob Grace

the NGO for which he worked had a policy against the use of military escorts. Yet, in a context where, due to the insecure nature of the field environment, the use of military escorts was ‘the only way authorities would accept movement’, they reached a creative solution by which the NGO travelled behind the armed convoy, ten minutes later. Another interviewee described similar dynamics at play during a hostage situation. The NGO he worked for had a policy precluding payment to secure hostages’ release, but in practice during hostage negotiations, the organisation

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs