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Susan M. Johns

example, Gwyn Williams also called her the ‘Helen of Wales’ in his popular and well-received When Was Wales? , as did Brynley Roberts in his survey of Gerald of Wales. 3 Nest’s beauty is a central motif in all interpretations of her and is key to the construction of her as the ‘Welsh Helen’. Her beauty is emphasised in other genres, such as modern popular interpretations of her in creative fiction. Her inscription as a great beauty is a result of interpretations of the Brut , and her beauty authorises the actions of Owain ap Cadwgan’s abduction. The following

in Gender, nation and conquest in the high Middle Ages
The abjection of the Middle Ages
Thomas A. Prendergast and Stephanie Trigg

As a disciplinary formation, medieval studies has long been structured by authoritative hierarchies and conservative scholarly decorums; the associated fear of error in medieval studies dates back to the Renaissance and the Protestant reformation. In contrast, medievalism increasingly celebrates creative play and imaginative invention. Such invention inevitably produces anxiety about historical accuracy. Popular scholarship and journalism in turn are often attracted to the abject otherness of the Middle Ages, especially the torture practices associated with its judicial systems. Such practices are designed to solicit the truth, and so, like illness, mortality and death, they are a useful double trope through which to analyse the relationship between medieval and medievalist approaches to the past.

in Affective medievalism
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Sally Mayall Brasher

was modelled, often officially, to older ecclesiastical models of monastic governance. Rules and statutes were imposed that closely followed an ideal of vita apostolica . Lay fervour originated a wide variety of institutional responses of which the hospital is one, but while creative, confraternities, semi-religious orders, and lay groups all fell back on ecclesiastical models of acceptable administration and communal life. As happened frequently in older religious institutions it became difficult to maintain such rigour and commitment over the course of a

in Hospitals and charity
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Medieval and medievalist practice
Thomas A. Prendergast and Stephanie Trigg

and post-medieval versions of that past. As a curious, affective hook for modern readers, the old chair feeds the desire shared by the historical and medievalist imagination to feel, touch and see the medieval past in all its dramatic immediacy, whether that impulse is creative or more scholarly. This episode certainly appeals to the archivist’s excitement about seeing an authentic source in an

in Affective medievalism
Thomas A. Prendergast and Stephanie Trigg

. This held true for medieval historians and historicist literary critics trying to get back to the historical past and free it from modern preconceptions, as well as practitioners of medievalism asserting their right to reconstruct the Middle Ages using methods that might well be scholarly, but that might equally be more creative and inventive. No matter what the social, intellectual, personal or

in Affective medievalism
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Elisabeth Salter

that same text by one particular reader is also likely to vary at different moments or across time. And all readers, from the scholar to the beginner, are capable of deliberate and accidental misconstrual, misunderstanding, or reading against the grain, although all these readings can still only ever be within a range that is contextually and culturally appropriate, however innovative or creative the reading is. Salter, Popular reading in English.indd 225 21/05/2012 10:15:12 226 Popular reading in English c. 1400–1600 The evidence that I discuss in this book

in Popular reading in English c. 1400–1600
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Irene O'Daly

’ (whether we regard it as locatively or ideologically defined) permitted the adaptation of neo-Platonism to the goal of developing a mechanistic account of nature, whereby the initial creative activity of God could be distinguished from the secondary causes that continued to animate the world. 9 This achieved what Marie-Dominique Chenu termed the development of a mechanistic, as opposed to a symbolic, understanding of nature – in short, its desacralisation. 10 Thus, Thierry would write in his commentary on De inventione that the study of

in John of Salisbury and the medieval Roman renaissance
Elisabeth Salter

manuscript raises questions about the role and prioritisation of orality for the manuscript’s compiler and its readers, and the book also provides some evidence for the possibilities of creative readings or mis-reading of specific items. The remainder of this introductory chapter is divided into two main sections. The first addresses critical issues which lead to the formation of a vocabulary for the discussion of reading practice and experience. The second addresses the nature of the evidence used in this book including the approach I take to the formation of case studies

in Popular reading in English c. 1400–1600
Susan M. Johns

The narrative of Nest as a romantic tale which is blurred by hard political realities has inspired creative writers and populist interpretations of modern Wales. Such interpretations are derived from late-nineteenth-century interpretations of the Welsh medieval past, especially that of Edward Laws (1888) later endorsed by Lloyd (1911). The importance of Nest as the ‘Helen of Wales’ as a narrative which interlinks with a broader theme of Welsh resistance to Norman incursion relates to Victorian Anglo-Saxonism. Interpretations of medieval

in Gender, nation and conquest in the high Middle Ages
Eva von Contzen

the communicative 42 The Scottish Legendary resources generally available. In effect, it reinstates the ancient linkage between rhetoric and poetics[.]‌33 Rhetoric, the eloquent and persuasive usage of language, and poetics, the creative principles underlying a text, are regarded as two sides of the same coin. Based on its linguistic structures and means, a text has functions and may influence the audience, which requires the text’s embedding in social, historical, and cultural contexts. It is not a coincidence that rhetorical and pragmatic approaches to

in The Scottish Legendary