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Lindsey Dodd

the threat, while Édith’s mother downplayed it. The frequency of alerts required creative solutions at school. The teachers at Bernard Lemaire’s school in Lille got tired of interruptions, and so ‘they set up classrooms in the basement’. Many schools did not have cellars. For Sonia Agache in Hellemmes, the shelters were ‘behind the school in the park [where] they’d dug some trenches’, whereas Josette Dutilleul, elsewhere in Hellemmes, went ‘under the church where they’d strutted the cellars’. In Aulnoye, Jean Denhez said his teacher ‘made us leave the school and lie

in French children under the Allied bombs, 1940–45
Madeleine Leonard

instances where this was not the case. Moreover, there may have been instances of pupils who attended schools in interface areas but did not live in the immediate interface area. Using questionnaires While questionnaires are often avoided in research with young people, more interactive and creative methods being favoured, this study found the questionnaire to be a

in Teens and territory in ‘post-conflict’ Belfast
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Elke Schwarz

's conception of ‘divine violence’ (Finlay 2009 : 40–1; Benjamin 2007 : 297–300), in that it defends instrumental violence only for the breaking up of existing, oppressive structures, not – and this is an important difference in understanding Arendt's analysis of instrumental violence – to bring about a new structure (Finlay 2009 : 40–1; Benjamin 2007 : 297–300). The perceived creative potential of violence is made manifest in a biopolitical

in Death machines
Stephen Benedict Dyson

’ experience in Afghanistan – the iconic image of which was special operatives on horseback acting as spotters for laser-guided missiles – made him a convert. Rumsfeld moulded Franks into a general who was creative in terms of doctrine and from whom he could expect a constructive reaction to questions. Former House Speaker Newt Gingrich, who as a member of the Defence Policy Board knew both men and observed

in Leaders in conflict
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Graham Spencer

cities in relation to communal identity is similarly useful here. Diverse and creative cities, Sennett notes, are the opposite of those that seek to impose order based on myths of the purified community. Such places, for Sennett, breed narrow and violence-prone lives, as compared to cities that display vigour and diversity because of an ‘equilibrium of disorder’ (Sennett 1970 ). Both Connolly

in Inside Accounts, Volume II
An interview with Liz O’Donnell
Graham Spencer

Agreement, as a document, was a masterful and creative piece of drafting and my legal training did help me. My experience as an opposition TD in interrogating words, drafting and amending legislation and being creative with language was also very useful. I should say that when I was appointed by the Cabinet to deal with the North I was sufficiently overawed by the responsibility ahead of me that I devoted

in Inside Accounts, Volume II
An interview with David Donoghue
Graham Spencer

officialdom, on which we drew in forming our sense of what was happening in Northern Ireland and in the peace process. The Secretariat had an outreach capacity which we utilised to the full, inviting in a whole range of people from different walks of life such as business, trade unions, social and community groups and political parties. Would you say that the peace process was a creative process

in Inside Accounts, Volume II
Elke Schwarz

was concerned that the cyclical, repetitive and literally futile acts involved in all life processes were recast as ‘creative’ work, as a form of action, in modernity. Where labour subsumes work, the backdrop of a shared world turned from permanence to futility. Here futility is not an expression of pointlessness but, rather, expresses the cyclical structure of consumption and production which is contrary to building permanent structures, as is the concern of

in Death machines
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Sandra Buchanan

concept of cultural violence, defined as ‘those aspects of culture … that can be used to justify or legitimize direct or structural violence’. 8 Innovatively, Galtung defined peace as ‘nonviolent and creative conflict transformation … to know about peace we have to know about conflict and how conflicts can be transformed, both nonviolently and creatively’. 9 Until Galtung

in Transforming conflict through social and economic development
An interview with Wally Kirwan
Graham Spencer

Minister, who were heading the negotiating team and their legal advisors. The people we actually dealt with were found to be very creative and able to understand the need for a well-worked compromise. They were very constructive. Was there a similar concern about the need for agreed language and the implications of that language? There would have been after the

in Inside Accounts, Volume II