Search results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 179 items for :

  • Manchester Studies in Imperialism x
  • All content x
Clear All
Creole interventions in Sierra Leone
Richard Philips

contact and exchange. If, for many years, this socially diverse colony was at the cutting edge of a certain kind of black liberation and advancement, then that was not the work entirely of its founders and governors, in the form of companies and foreign governments, but also of the people who lived in and passed through it. Second, as the image of Freetown market makes clear ( figure 7.1 ), colonial contact zones also had the potential to be more anarchic, sites of multiple experiments and everyday creative acts, in which

in Sex, politics and empire
Abstract only
Norman Etherington

imperialism to subdue savage peoples and the civilised individual’s need to keep a lid on the savage urges welling up from within. A number of conservative imperialists active in the creative arts exploited that parallel in works whose aesthetic power arises from the contest between the order they upheld in their politics and the countervailing forces of savagery: a contest whose outcome is always in doubt

in Imperium of the soul
The Dutch colonial world during Queen Wilhelmina’s reign, 1898–1948
Susie Protschky

at its apex. Cannadine was concerned to reconstruct how the British ‘saw’ their empire, and thus gave due attention to how imperial authority was portrayed as spectacle through visual and material culture. In concentrating on representation, however, he provided little evidence as to how this ornamental structure was ‘seen’, or thoughtfully received and creatively responded to, by people in the colonies. 25 Very recently, historians of empire have begun to research these

in Photographic subjects
Abstract only
Laughing at Livingstone?
Justin D. Livingstone

an array of perspectives and politics. This chapter, however, moves away from professedly ‘factual’ representations to consider the consciously fictional. Surprisingly, studies of Livingstone have almost universally ignored the creative literature that the missionary explorer generated. Certain scholars – Clare Pettitt and John M. MacKenzie among them – do draw attention to several of the novels and plays

in Livingstone’s ‘Lives’
Brenda M. King

between England and India through the textile trades, which were open to creative enterprise and initiative. The dynamic networks of commerce interconnected both countries over centuries and mutual understandings were commonplace as there were many conjoint factors. However, where textile design was concerned, designers and manufacturers in England frequently and unambiguously

in Silk and empire
Abstract only
Portraits of the monarch in colonial ritual
Susie Protschky

colonial subjects, however, photography was the tool that enabled the most flexible, mutable and creative engagement among and between herself and the people of the Indies. Notes 1 In 1910 a step-brother of Prince Hendrik, Duke Johann Albrecht of Mecklenburg (1857–1920), also toured the Indies. He visited the Sultan of Yogyakarta, Hamengku Buwono VII, as recorded by the court photographer Cephas: KITLV shelf marks 151243

in Photographic subjects
Working life in the Customs
Catherine Ladds

, in the eyes of many, outmoded institution. In disentangling these issues, this chapter contends that employees of imperial institutions were required to steer creatively through a range of often-contradictory political currents in their professional lives. In the case of the Customs these forces included official directives from the Inspectorate, changes in central government, specific local political

in Empire careers
The political and aesthetic imagination of Edwardian imperialists

Some of the most compelling and enduring creative work of the late Victorian and Edwardian Era came from committed imperialists and conservatives. This book explores the relationship of the artists with conservatism and imperialism, movements that defy easy generalisations in 1899. It does so by examining the work of writers Rudyard Kipling, Joseph Conrad, Rider Haggard and John Buchan along with the composer Edward Elgar and the architect Herbert Baker. The book presents an analysis of their mutual infatuation with T. E. Lawrence, or Lawrence of Arabia, who represented all their dreams for the future British Empire. It also explores the reasons why Lawrence did not, could not, perform the role in which his elder admirers cast him, as creative artist and master statesman of British Empire. Haggard's intrusion into Sigmund Freud's dream world at a critical point in the development of psychoanalytic theory suggests a divergent approach to the novels of imperial adventure. Writing imaginative literature about India as an imperialist enabled Kipling to explore a whole universe of perverse and forbidden pleasures without blowing the top off the volcano. Elgar occupies a higher position in the world of classical music than anyone imagined even at the zenith of his popularity in the Edwardian era. John Buchan mixed art and politics to a greater extent than any British writer, especially with his 'The Loathly Opposite'. The real-life political counterparts of the imperial romance were Britain's experiments with indirect rule from Fiji and Zululand to Nigeria and Tanganyika.

Abstract only
The death- knell of the imperial romance and imperial rule
Norman Etherington

The analogy some creative individuals drew between a savage inner self held in check by an imperial apparatus of self-control, and the policies required for the governance of Britain’s new tropical empire in the years between Gordon’s death at Khartoum and Lawrence’s adventures in Arabia, had spurred a variety of stimulating endeavours in the arts. Little by little the

in Imperium of the soul
Brenda M. King

about 1890. Although the Movement was anti-industrial to a large extent, prominent designers of the Arts and Crafts Movement and like-minded English textile manufacturers collaborated in mutually beneficial ways, which helped the Movement to progress. Technical and design developments by industrialists were often due to symbiotic, creative relationships with designers. Leading creative members of

in Silk and empire