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Marta Iñiguez de Heredia

6 Creative survival as subversion I Solidarities and creative tactics against ‘conditions of death’1 n the DRC, the exercise and consolidation of state authority does not necessarily imply social transformation or a real commitment of the state to impose itself but, rather, the management of state absences and state presences through a plurality of authorities. Still, the patterns of coercion and extraction that have followed from the 20 years of conflict, with the different state-making and peacebuilding processes, determine the conditions for the

in Everyday resistance, peacebuilding and state-making
Lesley Pruitt and Erica Rose Jeffrey

. Likewise, we believe these themes deserve more investigation in the service of peacebuilding, so we aim to begin that journey in this chapter. To date, practitioner self-care is underexplored in Peace and Conflict Studies, even though peacebuilders themselves could benefit immensely from further enquiry in this area, which could in turn strengthen the depth and quality of their work as facilitators for peace. Indeed, the research for this book has suggested that, through dance and creative movement, participants had an opportunity to experience themselves in a way that

in Dancing through the dissonance
Abstract only
Lesley Pruitt and Erica Rose Jeffrey

As a musician who works for peace, ‘unity’ holds less interest for me than ‘harmony.’ Unity is when we all sing the same note. Harmony is when we sing different notes, and they are beautiful together. David Lamotte, musician and peace activist This quote from David Lamotte points to important aesthetic and creative considerations. It also highlights some

in Dancing through the dissonance
Lesley Pruitt and Erica Rose Jeffrey

polarity; the fundamental belief in and pursuit of the creative act; and the acceptance of the inherent risk of stepping into the mystery of the unknown that lies beyond the far too familiar landscape of violence. 5 We share his belief that the wellspring of peacebuilding rests in the moral imagination and his acknowledgement that such imagination is difficult and messy, but also necessary for

in Dancing through the dissonance
Lesley Pruitt and Erica Rose Jeffrey

and mirroring in particular can also have their challenges or limits, which we also explore. This chapter makes a few key points: (a) nonviolent engagement with, and expression of, emotions are vital to peacebuilding; (b) empathy can play an important role in emotional peacebuilding; and finally, (c) dance and creative movement activities, such as the use of mirroring, when done reflectively, can be valuable practices for developing empathy and supporting peacebuilding. Emotions, dance and the politics of building peace

in Dancing through the dissonance
Abstract only
Anca Mihaela Pusca

chapter clearly suggested that a collective self-recognition of the trauma imposed by the transition as well as an acknowledgement of the “sacrifice” would do more good than forcing an overly positive image of it. Using Walter Benjamin’s creative engagements with the concept of shock, the chapter was also able to draw up some possible explanations for the relationship between intense feelings of nostalgia—in situations where these would not necessarily be warranted—and periods of transition and social change. Under particular circumstances, shock becomes much more than

in Revolution, democratic transition and disillusionment
Lesley Pruitt and Erica Rose Jeffrey

peace[building] process. So, it really is localised to their needs. ‘Claire’, M4P founder, United States Do local actors working outside the Global North experience and perceive the M4P process as localised? And what does it mean to be localised when it comes to peacebuilding programming? In this chapter we investigate what dance and creative movement can tell us about local and/or global approaches to peacebuilding, including how the local and the global

in Dancing through the dissonance
Lesley Pruitt and Erica Rose Jeffrey

in peacebuilding and the ways in which dance and creative movement can play a part in this process. The research conducted for this book suggests that dance can constitute an effective, inclusive pathway to support youth participation in peacebuilding. At the same time, the data gathered across the three case studies highlights the importance of developing approaches that are age specific, gender sensitive, culturally relevant and flexible. Youth, peace and security At least as far back as the beginning of the UN in 1945, the

in Dancing through the dissonance
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Anca Mihaela Pusca

between the organizations of civil society and political institutions, as well as the assumption that the democratization process can be measured in any way through the “strength” or “weakness” of civil society. Chapter 7 offers a more creative approach to understanding social change through an examination of the role that the visual plays in the formation, maintenance and destruction of collective illusions. Using the case of a group of photographers who see themselves as social anthropologists studying and tracking the Romanian transition through images, the chapter

in Revolution, democratic transition and disillusionment
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Germany in American post-war International Relations
Felix Rösch

Depression and the entry of the US into the two World Wars had challenged their self-understanding. 78 As summed up by Holborn: ‘America was in a state of crisis. Would the German immigration have happened ten years earlier, its intellectual outcome would probably have been marginal … as intellectual questions would not have been of much concern in a prosperous country.’ 79 As a consequence, calibrating between external and existing knowledge, American scholars and émigrés were encouraged to rethink their commonly accepted knowledge, leading to creative meaning

in Prussians, Nazis and Peaceniks