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David Geiringer

women did, though, encounter a very particular set of concerns and questions relating to their faith. The interviewees’ memories of early marriage were defined by a tension between the physical, bodily concerns of sexuality and the transcendent, ethereal domain of religious beliefs. Amidst the daily pressures that this schism exerted on them, they did not forgo their faith or relationships, but pursued creative

in The Pope and the pill
Hayyim Rothman

consciousness’ is an ‘organic part of our being,’ a striving for goodness that ‘cannot pause midway’ but must be oriented toward ‘the idea of absoluteness, or the highest good’ even if the latter cannot actually be reached. In this way, he argued, ‘the source of morality lies in humankind’ but he relates to it as something beyond himself; it is thus firmly grounded while yet free to function as a ‘creative force’ in progress toward perfection. This is how Steinberg understood the rabbinic doctrine of ‘Torah from Heaven ( Torah min ha'shamayim )’ — ‘moral truth stems from God

in No masters but God
Abstract only
David Geiringer

active categorisation of sexual and religious experiences provided something of a lifeline for many of the interviewees’ Catholic faith. It was a mechanism that developed in the later stages of their marriages to deal with the conflicts, tensions and frustrations they encountered in early marriage. Just as Catholic women pursued creative, physical tactics to negotiate spiritual and sexual impulses while

in The Pope and the pill
Hayyim Rothman

drawing on the hasidism to creatively reformulate Jewish spirituality for the Westernized Jewish masses (Persico 2014 ; Biale 2017 , 556–574) demonstrated the same tendency, it was most radically exemplified by followers of R. Yehudah Ashlag (1885–1954). Starting in the early 1940s with figures like Levi Yitshak Krakovsky (Meir 2013 ), but gathering momentum during the 1960s and 1970s with the founding of the Kabbalah Center under the leadership of R. Phillip Berg, a modified and simplified version of Ashlagian teachings was brought to the general public (Myers 2007

in No masters but God
Hayyim Rothman

line of reasoning extends even products of the spirit: ‘the eye sees and the ear hears’ while the artist or thinker is scarcely aware ‘that his mind and his heart are being sown’ with ideas that later sprout during the creative process. Thus, his work is not ‘without external causes;’ it too comes ‘via the domain of another.’ Drawing an analogy to the rabbinic principle that partners to a single deed share liability for damages (Bava Kama 51a), Heyn indicated that partnership in the production process implies shared claims to the results (Heyn 1970 , 202–203). In

in No masters but God
Hayyim Rothman

familial mutuality he anticipated could only be achieved through the mutual task of creatively sustaining human life. Three, spiritual development; because Hofshi believed — like other religious anarcho-pacifists considered here — that the revolution of the heart is the foundation of world-revolution, cultivating the former becomes an imperative. Finally, and perhaps most importantly, a commitment to applying the same ideals to others; if, he says, ‘our external relations are not founded on the same principles as our life within the settlement, nothing new, or nothing

in No masters but God
Cara Delay

that the result was a ‘cultural cataclysm’, in which patterns not only of behaviour but also of thought were transformed. Gone, she argues, were the ‘imagination, memory, creativity and communication’ of the vernacular system, and in their place came ‘linear and colonial thought-patterns’.68 These transformations were also gendered: Bourke, Nuala Ní Dhomhnaill, and others have interpreted the modern, literate world’s overtaking of ‘creative’ oral traditions as a victory of the masculine over the feminine, the triumph of the male-led ‘devotional revolution’ over the

in Irish women and the creation of modern Catholicism, 1850–1950
Carmen Mangion

speech to be positive and creative. With the lessening of structures, our speech tends at times to unconstructive criticism, to lack of discretion, and to emotional out-pourings. No one wants to go back to the rigid structure; some think that more defined norms would help, many are trying to take as their principle Consideration for Others which would include control and quietness of word and action. 63 One sister acknowledged the difficulty of the transition: [W]hen the lid came off, you know, and people began to share and exchange it was very … People, well

in Catholic nuns and sisters in a secular age
Abstract only
Carmen Mangion

institutes (national and international) have also banded together on large multi-congregational international projects such as the Arise Foundation that combats modern slavery. 90 Collaborative initiatives have a greater impact and presence and utilise the expertise of a larger group of sisters. In examining the vitality of a select group of religious institutes, theologians noted a ‘strong sense of resilience as their most significant and enduring form of vitality’. In this, sisters model to the Church and to wider society ‘ways of living diminishment creatively and

in Catholic nuns and sisters in a secular age
Hayyim Rothman

community, he claimed to see ‘the means to destroy the present order and build a new society (Zalkind 1922g ).’ Thus, he wrote: As the individual understands the present social order, he must free himself and his creative powers from their institutions. It is not necessary to wait until the whole proletariat is free. The individual strives to free himself from slavery through his own production. As soon as he is able, he links up with like-minded people and, in this manner, begins an anarcho

in No masters but God