Search results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 13 items for :

  • Manchester Literature Studies x
  • All content x
Clear All
Tom Woodin

work that arose from workshops bore the marks of a more literary approach than other texts published by Fed groups, which might have involved an editorial group working with a single writer. In writing workshops, complex, onerous and prolonged feedback on multiple drafts ensured this was the case. Liz Thompson’s Just a Cotchell: Tales from a Dockland’s Childhood and Beyond has many of the hallmarks of a novel. Thompson developed her book through involvement with Basement Writers, which provided a launch pad into a creative exploration of her past. She developed a

in Working-class writing and publishing in the late twentieth century
Tom Woodin

stop the clock and look at the world in slow motion while building expectation. 40 Working-class writing and publishing in the late twentieth century Straight description becomes a creative process. The silence is broken by a noise as we are introduced to a setting suspended in time. The rapid succession of actions, as the four players interact, cleverly mirrors the casting of dominos. Language was debated in a context where education and culture overlapped directly. While many proponents of young people’s writing directly encouraged the use of slang and non

in Working-class writing and publishing in the late twentieth century
Tom Woodin

developing his work; he recalled in 1982, going for a meeting with the [Leyland Motors] shop stewards … they could invite me as an outsider to their meeting in works time and arrange for me to put this [performer] on the shop floor.25 Similarly, Joe Smythe was supported by the National Union of Railwaymen (NUR) to produce a book for the 150th anniversary of the Liverpool and Manchester Railway, and the Transport Review heralded him as ‘probably the first trade unionist to receive sabbatical leave for creative work’.26 In addition to the established labour movement avenues

in Working-class writing and publishing in the late twentieth century
Abstract only
More writing than welding
Tom Woodin

‘personal troubles’ and ‘public issues’, in the words of the sociologist C. Wright Mills, were explicit.14 Despite the obstacles that working-class writers faced in the world, many were able to draw upon elements of their experience that facilitated rather than limited creative expression. Thus writing and personal expression could arise directly out of working-class life; it was not something perceived as alien to lived experience. Thompson grew up in a post-war East London family, where the idea of performing or doing a turn was a familiar one: Within the family there

in Working-class writing and publishing in the late twentieth century
Tom Woodin

80 Working-class writing and publishing in the late twentieth century 4 A beginner reader is not a beginner thinker Although the whole worker writer movement was actively reshaping the uses of literacy, a distinctive group of texts were written by adult literacy students. Creative expression was seen as central to taking control of one’s own literacy development and educational materials were produced from which others could learn. Students did not necessarily see themselves as ‘writers’ until tutors introduced them to the idea. Despite the uniqueness of

in Working-class writing and publishing in the late twentieth century
Abstract only
Véronique Machelidon and Patrick Saveau

des modes d’expression et des choix de création’ (2012b: 20) (stood out … through a renewal of creative modes of expression). Since 2000, with the advent of a new generation of writers who have chosen different literary practices to assert their place and their voices, the shift away from time-worn clichés has taken a new dimension. As a matter of fact, post-beur authors’ new practices in both literature and film strive to break the chains of ideological, literary, memorial, spatial, gender, sexual, and ethnic constraints. They stage identities in flux, undermining

in Reimagining North African Immigration
Tom Woodin

, journalist and poet, in rebutting the panel’s decision, emphasised the dual purpose of the Fed: How does your Literature Panel know that the Federation will not produce another John Clare or unearth another Ragged Trousered Philanthropist? Besides, there is the question of promoting the enjoyment of and participation in literature.25 180 Working-class writing and publishing in the late twentieth century Others weighed in, with Eric Appleby from the National Federation of Voluntary Literacy Schemes stating that the Council was ignoring a ‘mass of undeveloped creative

in Working-class writing and publishing in the late twentieth century
Critical pedagogy in the community
Tom Woodin

’m a professional, I’m a professional community artist.’ We were very low paid, and when they cut that, you used to think, ‘Right, I won’t do it anymore’. But before that, it was a do-it-yourself culture … It was crusading.54 Funding and support brought unintended consequences. In Liverpool there was a direct link between the Fed, Merseyside Association of Writers’ Workshops (MAWW) and wider creative writing provision. Some members went on to get paid work in cultural and educational activities, and it was ironic that apparently favourable developments could lead to

in Working-class writing and publishing in the late twentieth century
Abstract only
Tom Woodin

creative instincts. Ultimately, the writing resists attempts to categorise it straightforwardly as literature or history. The self and the social The autobiographer inevitably deals with their life as a younger person. Childhood serves as a framing device through which a mixture of memory, The good old days? 59 analysis and argument is fed. Fed writers dealt with oral tradition and stories that had been passed on by word of mouth, part fiction and part fact. John Langley’s Always a Layman weaves these together in order to paint a picture of early life,14 sliding

in Working-class writing and publishing in the late twentieth century
Tom Woodin

France. From 1969 to 1972 a number of school student organisations were formed, such as the Manchester Union of Secondary School Students, and strikes were held by pupils in Manchester and London.18 This directed attention to a rich history of labour movements and struggles among working people. The great-grandson of the trade unionist Ben Tillett was in one of Searle’s classes, yet this history of ‘courage, ingenuity and creative skill’ hardly featured in history lessons.19 Later, as the press came to learn that Searle, in Classrooms of Resistance and The People Go

in Working-class writing and publishing in the late twentieth century