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Citizenisation and migratisation
Anne-Marie Fortier

derivatives of social, cultural and economic structures, the autonomy of migration lens reveals migration to be a constituent creative force which fuels social, cultural and economic transformations. Migration can be understood as a force which evades the policing practices of subjectivity. Migration can also be understood as a force that not only evades, but that reshapes what it means to be a citizen or migrant subject. To think about the pervasiveness and constitutive force of migration in today

in Uncertain citizenship
Anne-Marie Fortier

belonging and entitlement will not only make it more difficult to turn away from the inequalities they foster and reinforce, but that these examinations will contribute tools to help unravel these injustices and find alternatives to citizenship that embrace migration and difference as constitutive creative forces of all social life.

in Uncertain citizenship
Robert Fine and Philip Spencer

their individuality, that is, in their empirical life, work and relationships. In defending Jewish emancipation against the restoration of the Jewish question, Marx re-affirmed the subjective right of Jews to be citizens, to be Jews, and to deal creatively, singularly, in their own way, with their Jewish origins. Real humanism is a revolt against the tyranny of provenance. The humanist Marx we are endeavouring to uncover is doubtless not the only Marx we could

in Antisemitism and the left
Open Access (free)
Seas, oceans and civilisations
Jeremy C.A. Smith

history of the world can add to an elucidation of the dynamic inter-​relation of civilisations with the assemblage of oceanic forces. There are four aspects to this inter-​relation discussed in this chapter and then in Chapter 6. The four aspects criss-​cross the four dimensions of inter-​civilisational engagement. First is the orientation of civilisations to seas and oceans. Many societies exhibit a cultural and perhaps civilisational reluctance to embrace sea-​ going, while others are less hesitant. Creative orientations to seafaring can be seen in the acquisition of

in Debating civilisations
Perspectives on civilisation in Latin America
Jeremy C.A. Smith

were fostered in multiple dialogues with foreign currents in philosophy, literature, politics and art and with Latin America’s own multi-​civilisational past. Modernists made careful study of foreign trends. However, they also routinely tempered engagement of international currents with the struggle to find a place for them in cultural life. Writers, poets, philosophers and activists often turned to traditions they saw as their own when looking to place themselves in the world. They were at their most creative when unapologetically synthesising southern experiences

in Debating civilisations
Open Access (free)
Ontologies of connection, reconstruction of memory
Jeremy C.A. Smith

Pacific’s creative cosmologies telescope a past of high interaction into the present. It is important to foreground myths, the patterns of engagement, reciprocity and creation to compensate for the inherited cartographies of ‘emptiness’ bequeathed by colonialism and reproduced in current-​ day discourses of the Pacific Rim. A paradigm of inter-​civilisational engagement is evident in these patterns, even though connections with civilisations outside Oceania may have only fully come in the eighteenth century. There are resources for renewal in the cosmologies of

in Debating civilisations
Rodney Barker

resisting change or subverting or avoiding it. Creation When an attempt is made to create a new world either by rulers or by revolt against rulers, every aspect of human identity finds a place on the revolutionary agenda. Whilst attempted transformation from above differs in many ways from insurrection from below, each seeks to create new identities, and may do so across the whole range of human culture. There are both destructive and creative dimensions to such campaigns. In their extreme form, they involve the attempt to

in Cultivating political and public identity
Jeremy C.A. Smith

dualism was established. The universalism of philosophy and religions entering from Asia was relativised when resituated in Japanese cultural environments. Native traditions played off against foreign influences during the early era of adaptation of the Chinese model set an ontological blueprint of uchi-​soto (inside–​outside) orientations for relations with foreign cultures. Uchi-​soto demanded highly creative agency on part of the intelligentsia. In that role, intellectuals reinterpreted the polarised dualisms of the doctrines of Buddhism and Confucianism and

in Debating civilisations
Nanna Mik-Meyer

centre the individual participants in the encounter as creative and reflexive (Hoggett 2001: 37). However, even though this positioning of the individual client or patient as resourceful may reflect a positive development within policy research, Hoggett argues for a model of agency able to deal with individuals who also exhibit destructive behaviours towards themselves and others. This model of agency can deal with the negative capacities of the welfare subject and not only measure so-called creative agents against their abilities to act ­strategically (Hoggett 2001

in The power of citizens and professionals in welfare encounters
Open Access (free)
Jeremy C.A. Smith

underestimated. The indigenous civilisations subsumed had creative and complex cosmologies and sophisticated orientations towards interaction. They appeared, in European eyes, to lack the institutional complexes, economic forms and material structures of ‘civilisation’. Of course, colonisation of the Americas looked very different to the later subjugation of Oceania. Nevertheless, both historical processes had comparable aspects. In the imperial imaginary, the signs of civilisation were instituted originally in the Americas, forming part of western European experiences of

in Debating civilisations