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Gervase Rosser

jealously complained of the evident appeal of the friars. 6 Fraternities, too, added to the texture of urban religious life, and further accentuated the scope for the agency and variety of lay religion. 7 Urban wills are eloquent of a creative range of both devotional and fraternal ties, forged over a lifetime as so many means to address the challenges of life in the late medieval town [ 105 ]. The collective memberships of

in Towns in medieval England
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Gervase Rosser

histories in vindication of his council’s position in its battle over jurisdiction with the cathedral [ 5 ]. It fell in particular to clerks such as Robert Ricart of Bristol to combine the custody of urban records with the composition of glorificatory histories [ 6 ]. In other instances the business of compiling and ordering the records became a historically creative process in its own right. A case in

in Towns in medieval England
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Gervase Rosser

the half-millennium between 700 and 1200 witnessed one of the most experimental and creative periods in the history of the post-classical city. But the last medieval centuries of the English town, from 1200 to 1500, are also rich in interest; and it is an interest which in this period can be deepened not only by the finds of archaeology but in the new light of a great wealth of surviving documentation. It is the

in Towns in medieval England
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Gervase Rosser

, to the liberties of the nearby county town of Oxford (granted by royal charter in 1191) 15 is of interest, as is the use of the word ‘commune’ to describe the small body of tenants of the new burgages. The rhetoric of such a monastic charter as this presents the abbot in the creative role of urban promoter. But while the monastic licence was necessary, and the rents were set by the lord at a level

in Towns in medieval England
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Rachel Stone and Charles West

laws. 156 De divortio should be interpreted in a similar way: it is not a simple application of existing legal procedures to a case, but the creative discussion of a variety of legal and penitential concepts to ensure that justice (or at least Hincmar’s idea of it) was done. Sources of secular and Church law Hincmar accepted the general

in The divorce of King Lothar and Queen Theutberga
Simon Barton and Richard Fletcher

experimentative. Furthermore, they had no immediate successors. Leonese narrative history remained absolutely mute from c. 1150 until the composition of Lucas of Tuy’s Chronicon Mundi nearly a century later. The works translated here, varied as they are, stand together as witnesses to a distinct and creative phase of medieval Spanish historical writing. Further

in The world of El Cid
Diana Webb

. One especially creative amendment was that of Zita’s date of death, wrongly given in the Camaldolese copy as Wednesday 27 April 1279 (mcclxxviiii). As Papebroch correctly noted, 27 April was not a Wednesday in 1279. The Fatinelli manuscript would have told him that the right year was 1278 (mcclxxviii), when day and date did match, but he convinced

in Saints and cities in medieval Italy
Andrew Brown and Graeme Small

concentrate focus solely on ‘state’ or ‘civic’ control affords only the narrowest view of religious activity that took place in the period and region. It is easy to overlook other creative (and destructive) forces at work besides city and prince: the bishops who were apparently powerful enough to inspire civic processions at Tournai or Lille, or to contemplate

in Court and civic society in the Burgundian Low Countries c.1420–1530
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Alison I. Beach, Shannon M.T. Li, and Samuel S. Sutherland

Introduction Book One, more than any of the other books that comprise the CP, is a work of creative memory. Writing around 1136, in the wake of a tumultuous period of reform, political disruption, and even exile, the chronicler weaves an historical narrative that answers his community’s need for continuity with the past and security in the present. The focus of Book One is the story of Petershausen’s foundation by Bishop Gebhard II of Constance. The narrative is structured around the figure of Gebhard himself, with the chronicler first offering an account

in Monastic experience in twelfth-century Germany
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Monasticism in late medieval England, c. 1300–1535
Martin Heale

of late medieval monasteries to contemporary trends outside the cloister. In fact, it is arguably its creative responsiveness to contemporary trends outside the cloister – in religious and secular matters alike – that is the most salient characteristic of late medieval English monasticism. This should not be viewed as worldliness or laxity; rather it reflects a more outward-looking interpretation of

in Monasticism in late medieval England, c. 1300–1535