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Stephen Penn

itself surrounded by similarly abstruse technical musings, that concealed it from closer scholarly or ecclesiastical scrutiny. We have established that God is creative, but it remains for us to determine whether he can annihilate. And it seems to many that he should be able to do both, since there is an equally strong justification for each, and they are equal in extremity: God de facto created the world, so he should therefore be capable of annihilation. This argument has been confirmed in the following way: it is

in John Wyclif
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Stephen Penn

enquiries. 26 Wyclif is closer to the truth here. The Greek etymology is ’ állos (other) combined with ’ agoreúein (to speak). 27 Wyclif fails to identify a sixth way in which allegory works, and this concluding remark hardly qualifies as a plausible candidate. 28 Trópos is strictly ‘direction’, ‘route’ or ‘manner’, but Wyclif offers a creative interpretation of the word here. 29 This is almost right: the second part of anagogy derives from the verb ágein , ‘to

in John Wyclif