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Dana Arnold

here of Jacques Derrida’s essay ‘ Ousia and Grammē ’, 2 where he argues that to differentiate in absolute terms between time and space would demolish them both and undermine the basic theoretical tenet that it is possible to define something by that which it is not; that is to say its opposite. Instead, we are left with the spaces in between – with differences that give the illusion of presence. Space becomes, then, in Derrida’s argument no longer represented as a subject or object distinct from temporal events. It is instead ‘the rhetoric of temporality’, 3

in Architecture and ekphrasis
Raymond Pettibon’s drawing-writing
Tilo Reifenstein

, Jacques Derrida describes this kind of obstinate sign, one that seemingly belongs to language but refuses to be legible, as a mark which no ‘glottic thrust of reading … snatches … from the surface’.13 Snatched from the discourse of language, the unpronounceable character draws forth its own orthography of a word whose meaning is irrevocably altered. It perhaps captures breaking visually by breaking the k. Or, near the bottom of the cardboard, the circular blot that seems to counter the abundance of round unfilled Os around it and also acts as a black hole which sucks in

in Ekphrastic encounters
Hélène Ibata

relation to other framing practices and explain them in terms of parergonality, a notion introduced by Kant and more recently developed by Jacques Derrida. I will explain that Romantic formal experiments with unlimitation often took place in visual practices that were free from the quadrilateral frames of exhibition paintings, which were both ‘alienated’ from and auxiliary to the art work.3 Book illustrations, in particular, where visual representation could often provide its own edges, were a privileged ground of parergonal explorations. Such formal experimentations

in The challenge of the sublime
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Writing as a racial pharmakon
Alpesh Kantilal Patel

-eighth East Indian (as she notes on her website), none of these artists are of South Asian decent. However, at some point in their careers they incorporated sites in South Asia and/or signifiers connected to that part of the world as part of their artistic practices. Art historian Donald Preziosi’s invocation of Jacques Derrida’s pharmakon – the Greek word for both ‘remedy’ and ‘poison’ – is instructive in theorizing further how I approach whiteness.4 In his groundbreaking book Rethinking Art History: Meditations on a Coy Science, Preziosi provocatively writes that the

in Productive failure
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Chari Larsson

, art, and therefore the history of art. What is at stake here is Didi-Huberman’s place in the history of the French reception of Hegel. Didi-Huberman adds his voice to the distinctive anti-Hegelian current that has characterised French thought since the 1960s, particularly embodied in the work of Derrida, Foucault and Deleuze. Vincent Descombes described the shift in generational attitude towards the dialectic: ‘Burning the idol venerated until now, this generation denounced the dialectic as the supreme illusion, from which it sought to free itself through

in Didi-Huberman and the image
Declan Long

often masked or marginalised awkward facts about the legacies of conflict. This is a situation of aftermath that involves both the pressure to move 200 201 Conclusion – or against conclusions on and the related repression of much that cannot fit within dominant discourses of progress. The Good Friday Agreement called for a ‘fresh start’ but the society has remained perturbed by what Derrida refers to in another context as ‘the persistence of the present past’.2 As Willie Doherty notes, this is a simultaneously ‘settled’ and unsettling predicament in which it is

in Ghost-haunted land
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Dana Arnold

converge in Euclidean space. Instead tactile considerations, derived from bodily spatiality, remain more important than purely visual information – a point to which I shall return. 13 And, arguably, Nelson Goodman, shares Berkeley’s interest in how unavoidably existent things rest within the mind. 14 I do not want to rehearse these debates here, rather my point in referring to them is to flag that the kind of reasoning that Berkeley was presenting is not solely the preoccupation of recent philosophical thought. Indeed, we also find echoes of Derrida’s concerns in his

in Architecture and ekphrasis
Author: Chari Larsson

Didi-Huberman and the image is an introduction to French art historian and philosopher Georges Didi-Huberman. With an enormous body of work spanning four decades, Didi-Huberman is considered one of the most innovative and influential critical thinkers writing in France today. In this monograph art historian Chari Larsson presents the first extensive English-language study of Didi-Huberman’s research on images. Placing Didi-Huberman’s project in relation to major historical and philosophical frameworks, this book shows not only how Didi-Huberman modifies dominant traditions, but also how the study of images is central to a new way of thinking about poststructuralist-inspired art history. This book explores the origins of Didi-Huberman’s project, arguing he has sought renewal by turning the discipline of art history on its axis, wresting it away from its founding ‘fathers’ such as Giorgio Vasari and Erwin Panofsky and instead reorganising it along the poststructuralist lines of Michel Foucault, Jacques Derrida and Gilles Deleuze. An image is a form of representation, but what is the philosophical framework supporting it? Didi-Huberman takes up this question repeatedly over the course of his career.

Chari Larsson

younger generation of scholars who, following in the wake of Derrida, sought to work through the implications of deconstruction. This chapter will examine Didi-Huberman’s retrieval of matter by way of three themes that characterised his writing through the 1990s: the pan , dissemblance and presencing. The prioritisation of form over matter enjoys a long philosophical history reaching back to Plato and Aristotle through to Descartes and beyond. For Didi-Huberman, art history had uncritically absorbed this hierarchical binary. Extending his argument delineated in

in Didi-Huberman and the image
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Chari Larsson

technique creates an interweaving of positive and negative, visible and invisible, form and informe . In this way, Didi-Huberman draws Hantaï close to Derrida and, ultimately, Merleau-Ponty. In Memoirs of the Blind , Derrida stressed the interrelation between the visible and the invisible, writing, ‘this invisibility would still inhabit the visible, or rather, it would come to haunt it to the point of being confused with it’. 13 No longer binary and oppositional, the link between the visible and invisible becomes an interlacing ( l’entrelac ), a chiasmus. In Didi

in Didi-Huberman and the image