Search results

Abstract only
Derrida's recreational pharmacology and the rhetoric of drugs
Dave Boothroyd

2 Medusa’s blood: Derrida’s recreational pharmacology and the rhetoric of drugs ‘Drugs’ is both a word and a concept, even before one adds quotation marks to indicate that one is only mentioning and not using, that one is not buying, selling or ingesting the ‘stuff itself’ (la chose même). (Derrida, 1995: 228)1 The decision on drugs To remove any possible suspicion at the outset of an interview on drugs, Derrida reassures his reader – who may after all be a member of the Drug Squad – that to speak of drugs is not the same as to be on them or to be on the wrong

in Culture on drugs
Michael O’Sullivan

MUP FINAL PROOF – <STAGE>, 09/13/2013, SPi 5 International comparisons Jacques Derrida, Pierre Bourdieu and the French University The work of leading French academics such as Pierre Bourdieu and Jacques Derrida on education points to key differences in emphasis in the Irish and French university systems. However, the French university system did share, only much earlier, many of the key changes that have come to Irish universities since the 1980s. It experienced a surge in university numbers slightly earlier than its Irish counterpart. Alain Bienayme notes

in The humanities and the Irish university
Abstract only
Narco-cultural studies of high modernity
Author: Dave Boothroyd

Never has a reconsideration of the place of drugs in our culture been more urgent than it is today. Drugs are seen as both panaceas and panapathogens, and the apparent irreconcilability of these alternatives lies at the heart of the cultural crises they are perceived to engender. Yet the meanings attached to drugs are always a function of the places they come to occupy in culture. This book investigates the resources for a re-evaluation of the drugs and culture relation in several key areas of twentieth-century cultural and philosophical theory. Addressing themes such as the nature of consciousness, language and the body, alienation, selfhood, the image and virtuality, the nature/culture dyad and everyday life – as these are expressed in the work of such key figures as Freud, Benjamin, Sartre, Derrida, Foucault and Deleuze – it argues that the ideas and concepts by which modernity has attained its measure of self-understanding are themselves, in various ways, the products of encounters with drugs and their effects. In each case, the reader is directed to the points at which drugs figure in the formulations of ‘high theory’, and it is revealed how such thinking is never itself a drug-free zone. Consequently, there is no ground on which to distinguish ‘culture’ from ‘drug culture’ in the first place.

Annedith Schneider

leads to the other, but rather circular so that each makes the others possible. Jacques Derrida, in his final years, took up the topic of hospitality several times in his writing and in public speaking. In typical Derridean fashion, he discusses two different concepts of hospitality and then points out how they are inherently contradictory and yet inseparable. In a lecture on rights for immigrants and refugees originally presented to the International Parliament of Writers in Strasbourg in 1996 and later published as ‘On Cosmopolitanism and Forgiveness’ (Derrida 2001

in Turkish immigration, art and narratives of home in France
Abstract only
Drugs in theory
Dave Boothroyd

experimental readings of a number of texts by writers whose own diverse inquiries into the condition of modernity have found prominence in the annals of twentieth-century philosophy and cultural theory. This resulting cocktail of chapters I pass on to the reader to take as they wish. Together they offer a series of oblique and partial entries principally to the work of Freud, Benjamin, Sartre, Derrida, Foucault and Deleuze, in each case from the perspective of their encounters with drugs or on the basis of where the theme of ‘drugs’ touches upon their writings. This book

in Culture on drugs
Anomalies and opportunities

This is the first book-length study of the humanities from Newman to Bologna in the Irish context. It focuses on unique characteristics of university policy in the National University that constrained humanities education. Ireland was a deeply religious country throughout the twentieth century but the colleges of its National University never established a theology or religion department. The official first language of Ireland is Irish but virtually all teaching in the Arts and Humanities is in English. The book examines the influence of such anomalies on humanities education and on Irish society in general. Has the humanities ethos of the Irish University departed radically from the educational ideals of John Henry Newman, its most illustrious ‘founder’? The book re-examines Newman’s vision for the university as well as responses to the 1908 Universities Act. It investigates how leading Irish educationalists and cultural theorists such as Padraig, Pearse, Denis Donoghue, J. J. Lee, Declan Kiberd and Richard Kearney nurtured an Irish humanities perspective in response to more established humanities traditions associated with F. R. Leavis, Edward Said, and Martha Nussbaum. The book employs a comparative approach in examining recent humanities movements such as Irish Studies and postcolonial studies. Humanities debates from other national contexts such as France, the US, and Asia are examined in light of influential work on the university by Samuel Weber, Immanuel Kant, Pierre Bourdieu and Jacques Derrida. This book will appeal to the general public and to students and scholars of Irish education, history and cultural theory.

Dave Boothroyd

… they were all going crazy. (I. Welsh, Ecstasy, p. 27) No doubt we should have to make some distinction between… drugs, but this distinction is wiped out in the rhetoric of fantasy that is at the root of the interdiction: drugs, it is said, make one lose any sense of true reality. (J. Derrida, Rhetoric of Drugs, p. 236) Culture and interdiction Shortcircuiting the exasperating detour of communication, or more generally suspending the proactive expenditure of the will’s energy as it works to fuel its own consciousness, is the mark of an urge to a junkylike descent

in Culture on drugs
Abstract only
From the 'cocaine papers' to 'Irma's Injection'
Dave Boothroyd

(and selfadministered) in clinical practice. Throughout, I have attempted to show, this entire intellectual trajectory was influenced by the multiple and often ambivalent ‘effects’ connected with cocaine – ‘the episode’, the drug, his illness and habitual use, his conscience about matters related to it and so forth. Given the vast critical literature dealing with Irma’s Injection, I restrict my discussion here solely to the question posed at the outset of this chapter concerning the connection between psychoanalysis and drugs. 94 Culture on drugs Derrida on ‘Irma

in Culture on drugs
Abstract only
Caroline Bassett

signifiers and signifieds are not in a natural relationship, without a shared linguistic structure humans would have no means of understanding each other. As Derrida has pointed out, here is the rationale not only for the erection of a formal structure (langue) but also for Saussure’s concomitant belief that the proper study of linguistics is the study of that structure (Derrida, 1972: 60–76). This is a structure Saussure understood both as the condition for the possibility of comprehension and as standing outside language in its lived everyday use (parole). Saussure

in The arc and the machine
Race and nation in twenty-first-century Britain

Nationalism has reasserted itself today as the political force of our times, remaking European politics wherever one looks. Britain is no exception, and in the midst of Brexit, it has even become a vanguard of nationalism's confident return to the mainstream. Brexit, in the course of generating a historically unique standard of sociopolitical uncertainty and constitutional intrigue, tore apart the two-party compact that had defined the parameters of political contestation for much of twentieth-century Britain. This book offers a wide-ranging picture of the different theoretical accounts relevant to addressing nationalism. It briefly repudiates the increasingly common attempts to read contemporary politics through the lens of populism. The book explores the assertion of 'muscular liberalism' and civic nationalism. It examines more traditional, conservative appeals to racialised notions of blood, territory, purity and tradition as a means of reclaiming the nation. The book also examines how neoliberalism, through its recourse to discourses of meritocracy, entrepreneurial self and individual will, alongside its exaltation of a 'points-system' approach to the ills of immigration, engineers its own unique rendition of the nationalist crisis. There are a number of important themes through which the process of liberal nationalism can be documented - what Arun Kundnani captured, simply and concisely, as the entrenchment of 'values racism'. These include the 'faux-feminist' demonisation of Muslims.