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Derrida's recreational pharmacology and the rhetoric of drugs
Dave Boothroyd

2 Medusa’s blood: Derrida’s recreational pharmacology and the rhetoric of drugs ‘Drugs’ is both a word and a concept, even before one adds quotation marks to indicate that one is only mentioning and not using, that one is not buying, selling or ingesting the ‘stuff itself’ (la chose même). (Derrida, 1995: 228)1 The decision on drugs To remove any possible suspicion at the outset of an interview on drugs, Derrida reassures his reader – who may after all be a member of the Drug Squad – that to speak of drugs is not the same as to be on them or to be on the wrong

in Culture on drugs
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Narco-cultural studies of high modernity
Author: Dave Boothroyd

Never has a reconsideration of the place of drugs in our culture been more urgent than it is today. Drugs are seen as both panaceas and panapathogens, and the apparent irreconcilability of these alternatives lies at the heart of the cultural crises they are perceived to engender. Yet the meanings attached to drugs are always a function of the places they come to occupy in culture. This book investigates the resources for a re-evaluation of the drugs and culture relation in several key areas of twentieth-century cultural and philosophical theory. Addressing themes such as the nature of consciousness, language and the body, alienation, selfhood, the image and virtuality, the nature/culture dyad and everyday life – as these are expressed in the work of such key figures as Freud, Benjamin, Sartre, Derrida, Foucault and Deleuze – it argues that the ideas and concepts by which modernity has attained its measure of self-understanding are themselves, in various ways, the products of encounters with drugs and their effects. In each case, the reader is directed to the points at which drugs figure in the formulations of ‘high theory’, and it is revealed how such thinking is never itself a drug-free zone. Consequently, there is no ground on which to distinguish ‘culture’ from ‘drug culture’ in the first place.

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Drugs in theory
Dave Boothroyd

experimental readings of a number of texts by writers whose own diverse inquiries into the condition of modernity have found prominence in the annals of twentieth-century philosophy and cultural theory. This resulting cocktail of chapters I pass on to the reader to take as they wish. Together they offer a series of oblique and partial entries principally to the work of Freud, Benjamin, Sartre, Derrida, Foucault and Deleuze, in each case from the perspective of their encounters with drugs or on the basis of where the theme of ‘drugs’ touches upon their writings. This book

in Culture on drugs
Peter Barry

is built. Post-structuralism – life on a decentred planet Post-structuralism emerged in France in the late 1960s. The two figures most closely associated with this emergence are Roland Barthes and Jacques Derrida (1930–2004). Barthes's work around this time began to shift in character and move from a structuralist phase to a post-structuralist phase. The difference can be seen by comparing two different accounts by Barthes of the nature of the narrative, one from each phase, namely the essay ‘The Structural Analysis of Narrative’ (first published in 1966) and

in Beginning theory (fourth edition)
Dave Boothroyd

… they were all going crazy. (I. Welsh, Ecstasy, p. 27) No doubt we should have to make some distinction between… drugs, but this distinction is wiped out in the rhetoric of fantasy that is at the root of the interdiction: drugs, it is said, make one lose any sense of true reality. (J. Derrida, Rhetoric of Drugs, p. 236) Culture and interdiction Shortcircuiting the exasperating detour of communication, or more generally suspending the proactive expenditure of the will’s energy as it works to fuel its own consciousness, is the mark of an urge to a junkylike descent

in Culture on drugs
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From the 'cocaine papers' to 'Irma's Injection'
Dave Boothroyd

(and selfadministered) in clinical practice. Throughout, I have attempted to show, this entire intellectual trajectory was influenced by the multiple and often ambivalent ‘effects’ connected with cocaine – ‘the episode’, the drug, his illness and habitual use, his conscience about matters related to it and so forth. Given the vast critical literature dealing with Irma’s Injection, I restrict my discussion here solely to the question posed at the outset of this chapter concerning the connection between psychoanalysis and drugs. 94 Culture on drugs Derrida on ‘Irma

in Culture on drugs
Georges Didi-Huberman

two antithetical positions that I mentioned above. The first consists of extrapolating a loss of origins from Benjamin's ‘decline of the original’, and consequently of meaning in general. This requires us to superimpose a metaphysical notion, namely that of origin, in the traditional sense as criticised by Derrida, onto the technical reality presupposed by the original

in Perspectives on contemporary printmaking
Ruth Pelzer-Montada

. 2001 . ‘Flat Life’. A paper given at the University of Glasgow in March 2001 . www.stevenconnor.com/flat/ [Accessed 6 February 2013]. Darrieusseq , Marie. 2005 . White . London: Faber and Faber , 118–19 . Derrida , Jacques. 2005 . ‘Paper or Me, You Know … (New Speculations on a Luxury of the Poor)’. In

in Perspectives on contemporary printmaking
Identity, difference, representation
Nizan Shaked

psychoanalysis and Derridean deconstruction. In their criticism of the Enlightenment movement and its reliance on notions of human reason, Jacques Lacan and Jacques Derrida laid the groundwork to understand the mechanisms of patriarchy and their consequential societal function. Despite the fact that Freudian psychoanalysis articulated gender as a constructed identity, it was nevertheless a model that privileged the patriarchal, even if merely as a signifier. Following Freud, Lacan’s insight that the Oedipus complex is not a “natural” process, but rather is implied by a social

in The synthetic proposition
Anna Green and Kathleen Troup

’ favoured by postmodernism). 3 When historians first began to discuss the kinds of history suggested by the work of Jacques Derrida, Michel Foucault, and Jacques Lacan, we spoke of poststructuralism. Later, it was more common to refer to post-modernism, which Beverley Southgate recently described as ‘the continuing attempt to formulate a theoretical explanation for the situation that in practice (and by definition) we’re all in – the situation itself of postmodernity’. 4 Often, however, the unexplained conflation of these terms has led to confusion. Here, then

in The houses of history