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Alexandra Warwick

This article examines the prevalence of Gothic in contemporary culture and criticism. It suggests that the description Gothic’ has become widespread in the aftermath of Derrida‘s work Spectres of Marx and that this threatens to undermine Gothics usefulness as a critical category. In examining contemporary culture it identifies the notions of trauma and mourning in the popular imagination as having contributed to a condition where Gothic no longer expresses the anxiety of the fragmented subject, but reaches towards a valorisation of damaged subjectivity.

Gothic Studies
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Uncanny assemblage and embodied scripts in tissue recipient horror
Sara Wasson

, stranger, possibilities of relationality, two different philosophical concepts can be invoked: Jacques Derrida’s concept of ‘absolute hospitality’, and Gilles Deleuze and Félix Guattari’s concept of ‘assemblage’. Derrida describes ‘the absolute arrivant , who is not even a guest. He surprises the host – who is not yet a host or an inviting power – enough to call into question, to the point of annihilating or rendering indeterminate, all the distinctive signs of a prior identity’. 27 The receiver must accept the incomer entirely, including the risk that they may

in Transplantation Gothic
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The uncanny forms of novelistic characterization
Author: Alexander Bove

Through an extensive study of Dickens’s “new art form,” the illustrated novel, Spectral Dickens sets out to transform certain fundamental assumptions about realism, literary forms, and imitation of personhood that have long defined the discourse of novel criticism and character studies. This book redefines and expands the critical discourse on fictional character by bringing a wider range of modern critical theory to the study of Dickens’s characterization, using in particular the three “hauntological” concepts of the Freudian uncanny, Derridean spectrality, and the Lacanian Real to give new ontological dimensions to the basic question: “What is a character?” By taking into account visual forms of representation and emphasizing the importance of form in rethinking the strict opposition between real person and fictional character, Spectral Dickens shifts the focus of character studies from long-entrenched values like “realism,” “depth,” and “lifelikeness,” to nonmimetic critical concepts like effigy, anamorphosis, visuality, and distortion. Ultimately, the “spectral” forms and concepts developed here in relation to Dickens’s unique and innovative characters—characters that have, in fact, always challenged implicit assumptions about the line between fictional character and real person—should have broader applications beyond Dickens’s novels and the Victorian era. The aim here is to provide a richer and more nuanced framework though which to understand fictional characters not as imitations of reality, but as specters of the real.

Adrian Tait

. As I also argue, Marian's narrative plays a central role in determining (perhaps even over-determining) the reader's own response to Blackwater Park as itself an agential, but also a haunting presence. This is Gothicised landscape as revenant: ‘it begins by coming back ’, as Jacques Derrida suggested ( 1994 : 11, emphasis in original). As I conclude, there is another dimension to what Derrida called ‘the logic of haunting’ (10): the withdrawal or erasure that Blackwater's return presupposes. Even as it enacts a Gothic-like resurgence of the more-than-human world

in EcoGothic gardens in the long nineteenth century
Minding the gap in The Winter’s Tale
Elisabeth Bronfen and Beate Neumeier

‘The ear is uncanny’ ( Ear 33), considered Jacques Derrida, for the figure of the mother is always implicit in ‘the ear of the other’ (51). Whatever the boy whispers in his mother’s ear, to ‘fright’ her with his ‘sprites and goblins’ (28), therefore begs to be decrypted as the latent subtext of this play, an unhomely Gothic horror hidden beneath the homely dwelling of a romance

in Gothic Renaissance
Marie Mulvey-Roberts

dramatisation about the making of Nosferatu . Set in the aftermath of the First World War, Merhige’s film anticipates the rise of German fascism. Towards the end, a white-coated film-maker addressed as Herr Doktor becomes the uncanny double of a Nazi doctor projecting onto a Jew his own diseased ideology. Drawing on Derrida’s hauntology, the spectre of anti-Semitism within fascist cinema will be seen

in Dangerous bodies
Narrating incest through ‘différance’ in the work of Angela Carter, A.S. Byatt and Doris Lessing
Emma V. Miller and Miles Leeson

extreme’ 15 and this is true of both her narrative style as well as the content of her writing. Yet despite this, her fiction is widely read and respected, even when, as in The Magic Toyshop (1967), she appears to condone a societal taboo. However, Carter’s writing is as much characterised by what it is, as what it is not, and her work is balanced, somewhat precariously, upon what Derrida in his

in Incest in contemporary literature
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Phantoms, fantasy and uncanny flowers
Sue Edney

creative writing, noticeable in, for example, Sarah Perry's novel The Essex Serpent (2016), in which the place appears to be haunted by itself. Julian Wolfreys’ Victorian Hauntings ( 2002 ) is an example of the application of ‘hauntology’ (Derrida 2006 ) to Victorian literature, and is particularly relevant to emerging nineteenth-century media: photography, film, sound recording, as well as improved printing and other reproductive techniques. As Wolfreys points out, ‘the spectral is that which makes possible reproduction even as it also fragments and ruins the very

in EcoGothic gardens in the long nineteenth century
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Bodies dis(re)membered: Gothic and the transplant imaginary
Sara Wasson

project, in that it reaches to hold images of suffering without co-opting the radical difference of an other, or accepting closure – instead, to remain aware of the suffering of others in ways that ‘unsettle and wound’, as Jacques Derrida’s work urges, actively embracing a state of uneasy haunting, refusing to lay ghosts to rest. 46 Thirdly, Gothic representations can mediate a more conservative re-membering, more obedient to dominant trends, normalising particular forms of harvest or biomedical practice. This book is not only a reflection on the dangers of biomedicine

in Transplantation Gothic
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Elisabeth Bronfen and Beate Neumeier

-theatrical identity’, notwithstanding the attempts of André Tchaikowsky’s biographer, David A. Ferré, to append a facsimile copy of his death certificate and his will, to the final chapter of the book as part of a process of authentication. The role that Tchaikowsky’s skull plays in the drama of Hamlet is to proliferate a series of ‘voices’, and voice, as Derrida tells us, is that which

in Gothic Renaissance