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Open Access (free)
Brad Evans

battles, its pronouncements are never objective, self-evident or universally applied ( Evans, 2013 ). Arendt’s claim that violence can be justified but never legitimate must be reversed: violence is often legitimated in political arenas and juridical courts; but it can never be justified through an invocation of justice, except where the latter is limited to a reductive juridical paradigm. Justice is not law ( Derrida, 1992 ). Justice is the ability to live a life with dignity and free from lawful violence. Justice in this regard is not the end of power. It is an

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Abstract only
Elizabeth Dauphinée

statement of facts that seeks to minimize our exposure to uncertainty, incongruity, or paradox. They change as we change. Narrativity Storytelling is about securitizing; it is about securitising narratives and enshrouding them in a protective layer of reproduction so that their salience, relevance, and accuracy cannot be questioned. The witness, 127 4712P BOSNIA-PT/bp.qxd 6/12/06 15:04 Page 128 The ethics of researching war Derrida notes, is committed to telling the same story in the same ways each and every time. It is only in the ability to seamlessly corroborate

in The ethics of researching war
Jonathan Darling

different imaginations of advocacy, activism, and the rights of refugees have been articulated through a specifically urban frame of reference. In doing so, the chapter develops as follows. I begin by briefly outlining recent work on the ‘politics of urbanism’ (Magnusson, 2011 ) that has sought to contest the dominance of a statist perspective in understanding contemporary politics. Building on this urban political focus, I then discuss Derrida's ( 2001 ) deconstruction of hospitality and his call to establish ‘cities of refuge’ that challenge

in Sanctuary cities and urban struggles
Elizabeth Dauphinée

witness heard, the witness experienced. The witness must reproduce, faithfully, the substance of the testimony on demand, with no inconsistencies, no paradoxes, no intuition, or counter-intuition. Derrida argues that: ‘When I commit myself to speaking the truth, I commit myself to repeating the same thing, an instant later, two instants later, the next day, and for eternity, in a certain way. But this repetition carries the instant outside itself. Consequently the instant is instantaneously, at this very instant, divided, destroyed by what it nonetheless makes possible

in The ethics of researching war
Abstract only
Elizabeth Dauphinée

binaries that has got us this far in law and in ethics in the first place. For Derrida, this is expressed as the asymmetrical relationship between law and justice. Law is not justice because it provides prescription for action and is structurally incapable of taking into account the contingency – the particularity – of justice. Justice is fundamentally reliant on undecidability and on différance – the paradoxical imperative associated with both the requirement to defer the decision, and the simultaneous urgency that calls for an immediate response. For Derrida

in The ethics of researching war
Elizabeth Dauphinée

formulation; justice is un-ethical and violent.’26 Yet, for Jacques Derrida, the violence associated with the ineluctable, necessary, and just entry of the Third suggests that there is also an ethical violence in the relationship of the face-to-face that the Third tempers or mitigates. For Derrida, the Third protects against the violence of the possibility of unicity – of absolute affinity – between the Self and the Other. The Third mitigates against the possibility of rapture or ecstasy, against the possibility of the fusion of the Other with the Self. Indeed, the Third

in The ethics of researching war
Elizabeth Dauphinée

individuality and personification onto units of analysis, such as states, it would not seem that I am guilty of any greater misrepresentation. 15 4712P BOSNIA-PT/bp.qxd 6/12/06 15:04 Page 16 The ethics of researching war 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 An opština is roughly equivalent to a county or municipality. A tepsija is an all-purpose baking pan. Derrida argues that ‘friendship does not keep silence, it is preserved by silence.’ in George Collins (trans.) Politics of Friendship (London: Verso, 1997), p. 53. The question ‘čija si ti?’ translates

in The ethics of researching war
Zalfa Feghali

task; writing about the trace in a way that is readable is even more difficult. Along these lines, William Large asks: How is it possible to write about the trace, when it is not a phenomenon which offers itself to thematization and conceptualization? To adequately portray, if such a thing is possible, this signifying prior to a system of signs, would it not require a different kind of writing which did not operate at the level of description, designation and objectivity?25 Interestingly, Jacques Derrida and Emmanuel Levinas, both of whom are referenced extensively

in Crossing borders and queering citizenship
Nicole Scicluna

Derrida, 2003; Garton Ash, 2007), which coincided with (ultimately unsuccessful) efforts to give the EU a constitution. In addition to the internal identity-building function, the propagation of NPE has an external dimension. The EU has a strong interest in trying to shape the world in its own image. During the Gulf War, the Belgian foreign minister, Mark Eyskens, famously described the EU as an “economic giant, a political dwarf and a military worm” (quoted in Manners, 2010: 75). Nearly twenty years later, it is still true that the EU is a major trading power, but a

in The European Union in the Asia-Pacific
Rescaling migration, citizenship, and rights
Jonathan Darling and Harald Bauder

that arise from embedding sanctuary within the legal and social fabric of a city. In this sense, as Ridgley ( 2008 : 56) argues, the sanctuary city ‘is not only a space of protection from an increasingly anti-immigrant national security agenda, but also a potential line of flight out of which alternative futures can be materialized’. Finally, discussions in a European context have drawn attention to the growth of sanctuary-oriented movements (see Lundberg and Strange, 2017 ; Pyykkonen, 2009 ). From Derrida's ( 2001 ) evocative vision of a ‘city of refuge’ that may

in Sanctuary cities and urban struggles