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John McLeod

Ideology, interpellation, discourse In Chapter 1 we touched briefly upon some of the issues raised by the study of ‘colonial discourses’. Colonialism was often dependent upon the use of military force and physical coercion, but it could not function without the existence of a set of beliefs that are held to justify the (dis)possession and continuing occupation of other peoples’ lands. These beliefs are encoded in the language which the colonisers speak and to which the colonised peoples are subjected. This results in the circulation of a variety of

in Beginning postcolonialism (second edition)
Representation and the real in the twentieth-century avant-gardes
Liz Tomlin

1 Discourses of resistance: representation and the real in the twentieth-century avant-gardes Before embarking on an investigation of performance practice and theory from the 1990s onwards, it is necessary to take a look back over the twentieth century at the practices and theories that laid the ground for such work and that are still visibly influential in the later period that is the focus of this study. This chapter will argue that the new performance practices that emerged in the 1990s and 2000s are predominantly categorised by artists and scholars as

in Acts and apparitions
Edward Jacobs

Gothic Studies
Bulletin of the John Rylands Library
Bulletin of the John Rylands Library
Representations of Lower-Class Voices in Ann Radcliffe’s Novels
Reema Barlaskar

This paper investigates lower-class voices within the context of anti-Gothic criticism, using Ann Radcliffe’s novels and early Gothic critic Joseph Addison’s essays to highlight the ways in which Radcliffe reassigns value to the Gothic aesthetic. It further emphasizes Radcliffe’s reconfiguration of domestic roles as she positions patriarchal figures as anti-Gothic critics, the heroine as reader of gothic narratives, and lowerclass voices and tales as gothic texts. The Mysteries of Udolpho and Romance of the Forest subvert critical discourse and its motif of servants’ contagious irrationality. In Radcliffe’s novels, ‘vulgar’ narratives as superstitious discourse do not spread fear to susceptible heroines, embodiments of bourgeois virtue, but demonstrate the ways in which fear is a construct of patriarchal discourse. Servants and country people, in turn, construct a pedagogy for reading gothic texts that permit heroines to deconstruct metaphors of ghostly haunting embedded in their tales and resist patriarchal hegemony and interpretative authority over gothic texts.

Gothic Studies
The Elephant Man, the Neurotic and the Doctor
Andrew Smith

Smith argues that the medical memoirs of Sir Frederick Treves can be read as a Gothic narrative. Treves failure to account for Joseph Merrick (aka ‘The Elephant Man’) in scientific terms is supplanted by an attempt to plot Merrick in relation to literary forms, such as the Gothic. Additionally, Treves uses the Gothic in order to suggest the fears of incarceration and threatened male violence felt by an apparently neurotic woman. It therefore becomes possible to read Treves‘ memoirs as a document which reveals both the particular flavour of the Gothic discourse at the end of the nineteenth century and as a critique of medical practice.

Gothic Studies
The Powers of Were-Goats in Tommaso Landolfi‘s La pietra lunare (The Moonstone)
Keala Jewell

Jewell links the were-animals in Tommaso Landolfis novel La pietra lunare to population ecology in the 1930s. Landolfi imagines and narrates a were-population explosion in the specific historical context of the changes fascism brought to rural life when it favored a grain-based economy. When state policy attempts to manage grazing populations and the culture of transhumance, the uncontrolled growth of fast-breeding, broad-ranging, mountain-going were-goats in the novel puts the validity of fascist agricultural policy into question. When in secret at the full moon they couple monstrously and multiply, were-animals thoroughly challenge the effectiveness of discourses of controlled population management.

Gothic Studies
Bulletin of the John Rylands Library