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Understanding perceptions of Muslims in the news

This book considers how the coverage of Islam and Muslims in the press informs the thoughts and actions of non-Muslims. As media plays an important role in society, analysing its influence(s) on a person’s ideas and conceptualisations of people with another religious persuasion is important. News reports commonly feature stories discussing terrorism, violence, the lack of integration and compatibility, or other unwelcome or irrational behaviour by Muslims and Islam. Yet there is little research on how non-Muslims actually engage with, and are affected by, such reports. To address this gap, a content and discourse analysis of news stories was undertaken; verbal narratives or thoughts and actions of participants were then elicited using interviews and focus groups. The participant accounts point towards the normativity of news stories and their negotiated reception patterns. Individual orientations towards the media as an information source proved to be a significant factor behind the importance of news reports, with individually negotiated personal encounters with Muslims or Islam further affecting the meaning-making process. Participants negotiated media reports to fit their existing outlook on Islam and Muslims. This outlook was constructed through, and simultaneously supported by, news reports about Muslims and Islam. The findings suggest a co-dependency and co-productivity between news reports and participant responses. This research clearly shows that participant responses are (re)productions of local and personal contextuality, where the consequences of socially constructed depictions of Islam and Muslims engage rather than influence individual human thoughts and actions.

Constructing a queer haven
Author: Thibaut Raboin

Discourses on LGBT asylum in the UK analyses fifteen years of debate, activism and media narrative and examines the way asylum is conceptualized at the crossroads of nationhood, post colonialism and sexual citizenship, reshaping in the process forms of sexual belongings to the nation.

Asylum has become a foremost site for the formulation and critique of LGBT human rights. This book intervenes in the ongoing discussion of homonationalism, sheds new light on the limitations of queer liberalism as a political strategy, and questions the prevailing modes of solidarity with queer migrants in the UK.

This book employs the methods of Discourse Analysis to study a large corpus encompassing media narratives, policy documents, debates with activists and NGOs, and also counter discourses emerging from art practice. The study of these discourses illuminates the construction of the social problem of LGBT asylum. Doing so, it shows how our understanding of asylum is firmly rooted in the individual stories of migration that are circulated in the media. The book also critiques the exclusionary management of cases by the state, especially in the way the state manufactures the authenticity of queer refugees. Finally, it investigates the affective economy of asylum, assessing critically the role of sympathy and challenging the happy goals of queer liberalism.

This book will be essential for researchers and students specializing in refugee studies and queer studies.

Indigenous peoples and the development of international law
Patrick Thornberry

Ambiguous discourses 3 Ambiguous discourses: indigenous peoples and the development of international law Introduction Discussion of concept and practice on indigenous peoples facilitates responses to the question of whose history is to be recalled from among the infinity available. The retrospective element in the definitions suggests that we should find relevant histories in and beyond the discourses of colonialism; our presumptive universalism suggests that the frame for a search is global.1 The draft Declaration is replete with historical recollection. The

in Indigenous peoples and human rights
Less than theory, smaller than ideology
Amy Levine

4 Projecting discourse: less than theory, smaller than ideology Units and scale of analysis Studies of political processes have long been geographically-cum-morally spatialised between First World elite nationalism and Third World subaltern social movements. Lila Abu-Lughod (1990) and Sherry Ortner (1995) have described what they term a posture of ‘romance’ towards the latter while Iris Jean-Klein (2001) points up an inverse posture of ‘suspicion’ where the former is concerned. This ‘split posture’ effectively deconstructs First World elite nationalism while co

in South Korean civil movement organisations
Acceptance, critique and the bigger picture
Anne B. Ryan

9 Contemporary discourses of working, earning and spending: acceptance, critique and the bigger picture ANNE B. RYAN It has become commonplace to assert that Irish people now have more choices and enjoy a higher standard of living than ever before. An assumption also exists that the role of the ordinary citizen is to be a member of the paid labour force and a consumer, in order to ‘keep the economy going’. Many people consequently live in a work–earn–spend cycle, spending much of what they earn on possessions and services now considered essential for everyday

in The end of Irish history?
Jack Saunders

1 Car workers, trade unions and public discourse As trade unionism developed in post-war Britain, hostility towards labour militancy steadily increased in mainstream public discourse. After a comparative lull in ‘union-bashing’ between 1945 and 1955,1 unions came in for ever more criticism from politicians, the press and social commentators and even in popular fiction. These attacks intensified in the 1970s as Britain experienced more major strikes and deeper economic problems. In the wake of a series of government strike defeats in that decade, journalists

in Assembling cultures
Jeremy C.A. Smith

169 8 Japan in engagement and the discourses of civilisation If civilisational analysis is lacking with respect to Latin America, it has been far from inattentive when it comes to Japan. In previous chapters, Japan serves as an illustration of theoretical engagements with civilisational analysis, as well as illustrating different points of my own argument. The frequent choice of Japan is no coincidence: it has been a focal point of investigation for comparativists in the humanities, the social sciences and political economy with an interest in civilisations

in Debating civilisations
A reflective narrative
Patrick Thornberry

Indigenous peoples and HR 17 Indigenous peoples and the discourses of human rights: a reflective narrative The system of human rights is not closed. It is theoretically possible that forms of closure of normative categories will in time descend on indigenous groups, disabling the groups (normatively) from accessing minority rights, just as minorities are not encouraged to access indigenous rights. Such an outcome is not certain, and appears improbable in the present state of international law and relations. Closing off categories is also dubious morally and

in Indigenous peoples and human rights
The place of religion
Karin Fischer

32 2 Social upheavals and discourses on Irish identity: the place of religion To understand the contemporary relationship between school and religion in the Republic of Ireland, and the policies and debates that affect it, one must take into account the wider changes at work in Irish society over the past forty years. The aim in this chapter is to offer an overview of these changes, of the place of religion in them and of the fluctuations in the dominant discourse on Irish identity, within the political sphere in particular. Many articles and books published

in Schools and the politics of religion and diversity in the Republic of Ireland
Language, immigration and consequences for justice
Author: Kate Waterhouse

For the uninitiated, the Irish District Court is a place of incomprehensible, organised chaos. This detailed account of the court’s criminal proceedings, based on an original study that involved observing hundreds of cases, aims to demystify the mayhem and provide the reader with descriptions of language, participant discourse and procedure in criminal cases. The book also captures an important change in the District Court: the advent of the immigrant or the Limited-English-proficient (LEP) defendant. It traces the rise of these defendants and explores the issues involved in ensuring access to justice across languages. It also provides an original description of LEP defendants and interpreters in District Court proceedings, ultimately considering how they have altered the District Court as an institution and how the characteristics of the District Court affect the ability of limited English proficient defendants to access justice at this level of the Irish courts system.