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C. E. Beneš

others maintain harmony outwardly in their deeds and love inwardly in their hearts—and thus it says harmony between brothers and love of neighbours. Similarly, when in domestic matters people cooperate well in peaceful discourse, in this way expressing and a man and a woman that agree well together . And indeed, it is affirmed that discord between good people is bad in the words of the Apostle in the letter to the Corinthians, where he

in Jacopo Da Varagine’s Chronicle of the city of Genoa
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Gervase Rosser

towns, where the rhetorical language and the physical form of charters – no less significant evidence, for the attentive historian, than their constitutional content – helped to structure both the citizens’ sense of identity and the discourse of public life. 26 Paradoxically, the very intrusiveness of the crown’s control over the legal rights and fiscal obligations of the late medieval towns was a

in Towns in medieval England
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E.A. Jones

of 1348–9. The labour shortages and social upheaval that were the legacy of the plague led to considerable tensions around labour, begging, and social and geographical mobility, and hermits found themselves caught up in an increasingly strident discourse of vagrancy and ‘sturdy beggars’ [ 36 ]. This is the context for a suite of measures that seem to have been designed to put the hermit vocation on a secure canonical

in Hermits and anchorites in England, 1200–1550
E.A. Jones

reality’ in Rhetoric of the Anchorhold: Space, place and body within the discourses of enclosure, edited by Liz Herbert McAvoy (Cardiff: University of Wales Press, 2008), pp. 34–49. 4 Dives and Pauper , edited by P.H. Barnum, Vol. 1, part 2, EETS o.s., 280 (1980), p. 92. See also p. 93 for a passage on men’s hypocritical reasons for

in Hermits and anchorites in England, 1200–1550
E.A. Jones

Roberta Gilchrist, Contemplation and Action , pp. 187–90. 8 For a discussion of the evidence for and against the blocking up of the cell door, see my ‘Ceremonies of Enclosure: Rite, rhetoric and reality’ in Rhetoric of the Anchorhold: Space, place and body within the discourses of enclosure edited by Liz Herbert McAvoy (Cardiff

in Hermits and anchorites in England, 1200–1550
E.A. Jones

speak truth to power. 1 Alongside the desert saints Anthony and Paul the First Hermit, eremitic discourse appealed to outspoken biblical models: the prophet Elijah and John the Baptist, the solitary voice crying in the wilderness. In the reign of King John, the hermits Robert of Knaresborough and Peter of Wakefield both confronted the king. Robert lived to enjoy royal patronage, but Peter (as readers of Shakespeare’s King John

in Hermits and anchorites in England, 1200–1550
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Mayke de Jong and Justin Lake

encounters a more articulate discourse on the meaning of the public interest or ‘commonwealth’ ( respublica ). In the first book of Radbert’s funeral oration for Arsenius there is not yet any mention of it, but in the second it is all the more present, as part of a more general political terminology derived from Cicero and other classical authors. 37 This is one of several features that signals a different time of writing and context for the Epitaphium ’s two books. All the same, it was planned as one work, by a sophisticated author who, as we shall see, made the most of

in Confronting crisis in the Carolingian empire
E.A. Jones

Rhetoric of the Anchorhold: Space, place and body within the discourses of enclosure edited by Liz Herbert McAvoy (Cardiff: University of Wales Press, 2008), pp. 34–49, and for the enclosure rite in general, my ‘Rites of Enclosure’. 4 See my Speculum Inclusorum / A Mirror for Recluses: A late-medieval guide for anchorites and its Middle English

in Hermits and anchorites in England, 1200–1550
E.A. Jones

Nunnaminster). Although the three visions chart Margaret’s passage through purgatory and conclude with her reception into heaven, they are most memorable for the horrific punishments that are envisaged for the suffering souls. The most gruesome of these are reserved for priests (both secular and religious) who have proved unworthy of their office, and the work is best understood in the context of the early fifteenth-century discourse

in Hermits and anchorites in England, 1200–1550
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C. E. Beneš

were considered virtuous citizens and excellent rhetoricians, made ancient history a one-stop source for everything to do with running a republican city-state or participating in its civic discourse. Drawing from it, advice for magistrates and citizens of such republics came in multiple forms: historical (e.g. civic histories), moral or practical (e.g. guidebooks to behaviour), and even visual (e.g. the many thirteenth- and fourteenth

in Jacopo Da Varagine’s Chronicle of the city of Genoa