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Alison Powell

being in the world. This could be the intersection of data and citizenship, the relationship between data and bodies or the construction of value in relation to data. They are also asked to identify places of data resistance. At the end of a walk, where the groups have been asked to document their movement with a map, observations, collection of physical objects, they need to tell others a story of their journey. Data walking can be used as a tool for civic engagement (Balastrini 2017), or within a broader set of reflections on specific social or economic processes

in Ethnography for a data-saturated world
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Centralising emotions in football fandom
Mark Doidge, Radosław Kossakowski, and Svenja Mintert

. Not only are emotions part of our responses to events, but they also – in the form of deep affective attachments – shape the goals of our actions. (Jasper, 1998, 398) There has been an emotional turn in sociology in the twenty-first century. Goodwin et al. (2001) and Goodwin and Jasper (2004), for example, attempt to bring emotion back into the study of social movements. Yet sport is conspicuous by its absence. Few social activities command such a great range of emotional engagement in a public space: the ecstasy of victory; the despair of relegation; the joy of

in Ultras
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Mark Doidge, Radosław Kossakowski, and Svenja Mintert

fragmentation of the AC Milan ultras (Podaliri and Balestri, 1998). Spagnolo’s murderer was part of the Barbour Gang who dressed in ‘English’ Barbour jackets and sought to emulate English casuals. They acted independently of the main ultras group, the Brigate Rossonere, so they could evade police. The Poznan DOIDGE__9780719027624_Print.indd 9 08/01/2020 10:19 10 Ultras Pact in Poland drew up a similar set of ‘rules of engagement’ after an escalation of violence and police repression. The independent, separate and often hostile groups support each other in clashes with

in Ultras
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In search of global health
Didier Fassin

cases outside of sub-Saharan Africa, with one death, representing 0.01% of the total. Second, the much-criticized response on the ground was principally that of the impoverished and deficient national health systems, whose professionals paid a high toll in terms of the epidemic's lethality; and it benefited from the assistance of international NGOs, particularly Médecins sans Frontières, whose engagement was widely celebrated. By contrast, as Nitsan Chorev discusses in chapter 9 of this volume, the WHO was accused of not taking the epidemic seriously enough at its

in Global health and the new world order
Introduction
Claire Beaudevin, Jean-Paul Gaudillière, Christoph Gradmann, Anne M. Lovell, and Laurent Pordié

objects and actors that circulate: experts, pharmaceuticals, tools and policies. With this book we contribute to filling these gaps through a stronger engagement between history and anthropology, an attention to the history of the present and a harnessing of concepts (circulation, scale, transnationalism) that cross the two disciplines. Bringing historians and anthropologists into a closer conversation, at times based on integrated research, the book thus allows knowledge, practices and policies to be linked, while bridging the macro-history of post

in Global health and the new world order
Historical and anthropological approaches to a changing regime of governance

What does global health stem from, when is it born, how does it relate to the contemporary world order? This book explores the origins of global health, a new regime of health intervention in countries of the global South, born around 1990. It proposes an encompassing view of the transition from international public health to global health, bringing together historians and anthropologists to explore the relationship between knowledge, practices and policies. It aims at interrogating two gaps left by historical and anthropological studies of the governance of health outside Europe and North America. The first is a temporal gap between the historiography of international public health through the 1970s and the numerous anthropological studies of global health in the present. The second originates in problems of scale. Macro-inquiries of institutions and politics, and micro-investigations of local configurations, abound. The book relies on a stronger engagement between history and anthropology, i.e. the harnessing of concepts (circulation, scale, transnationalism) crossing both of them, and on four domains of intervention: tuberculosis, mental health, medical genetics and traditional (Asian) medicines. The volume analyses how the new modes of ‘interventions on the life of others’ recently appeared, why they blur the classical divides between North and South and how they relate to the more general neoliberal turn in politics and economy. The book is meant for academics, students and health professionals interested in new discussions about the transnational circulation of drugs, bugs, therapies, biomedical technologies and people in the context of the ‘neoliberal turn’ in development practices.

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A conclusion
Mark Doidge, Radosław Kossakowski, and Svenja Mintert

displayed banners in support of the Eintracht Frankfurt fans. It was clear that many groups felt empathy with the situation, recognising that while it may have been Eintracht Frankfurt today, tomorrow it could be any of them. It is this emotional engagement with protests DOIDGE__9780719027624_Print.indd 181 08/01/2020 10:19 182 Ultras that will make or break the ultras in the future. Recognising that they are all ultras and share a common activity will be crucial in overcoming the various regulations and legislative acts that are attempting to restrict ultras

in Ultras
Integrative concepts for a criminology of mass violence
Jon Shute

nascent criminology of atrocity and transitional justice. Beginning with a contextualizing survey of the puzzlingly ‘light’ engagement of criminology – the study of crime – with the crimes of mass violence, the chapter ­describes important themes in what might be called ‘moral arousal management theory’: that body of interdisciplinary theory that HRMV.indb 82 01/09/2014 17:28:37 Moral discourse and action  83 attempts to understand the ways in which the moral–emotional ‘work’ of crime is performed and managed. When applied to the production and treatment of corpses

in Human remains and mass violence
Looking at marriage migration regimes in Austria and Germany through the perspective of women from rural Kosovo
Carolin Leutloff-Grandits

they celebrated the engagement. Soon after, he left again for Germany. Such a hurried decision to marry is further complicated by the fact that the waiting time for a visa is often long. Those who desire to move abroad immediately after the wedding in rural Kosovo often conduct a civil marriage in the municipal administration at the time of the engagement to allow for the administrative procedures, as an official marriage certificate has to be presented along with the application for family reunion – all of which can take months or even longer

in Intimacy and mobility in an era of hardening borders
Narratives of Ukrainian solo female migrants in Italy
Olena Fedyuk

her very presence in Italy and closeness to Gianni impossible. And yet, while Irina's prime concern was indeed a residence permit, she also clearly cared about the daily routine of their relationship, and the sexual and emotional side of their engagement. Valentina seemed to appeal to Irina's moral obligation to make a practical choice in this relationship; she felt that it was Irina's responsibility to take care of her own prospects, not to be a burden, and she saw her relationship with Gianni as beneficial on all levels. In her understanding of

in Intimacy and mobility in an era of hardening borders