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the Scrapbooks of Dorothy Richardson (1748–1819)
ZoË Kinsley

This article offers a survey of the recently discovered scrapbooks collated over a number of decades by the Yorkshirewoman Dorothy Richardson (1748–1819). The large set of thirty-five volumes presents an important collection of press cuttings relating to the history and consequences of the French Revolution, and also contains ‘historical and miscellaneous’ material of a more eclectic nature. I argue that the texts significantly improve our understanding of Dorothy Richardson’s position as a reader, writer and researcher working in the North of England at the turn of the nineteenth century. Furthermore, her set of albums raises important questions about the relationship between commonplacing and scrapbooking practices, and the capacity of such textual curatorship to function as a form of both political engagement and autobiographical expression.

Bulletin of the John Rylands Library
Jerome de Groot

This article considers the childrens writer Alison Uttley, and, particularly, her engagements with debates regarding science and philosophy. Uttley is a well-known childrens author, most famous for writing the Little Grey Rabbit series (1929–75), but very little critical attention has been paid to her. She is also an important alumna of the University of Manchester, the second woman to graduate in Physics (1907). In particular, the article looks at her novel A Traveller in Time through the lens of her thinking on time, ethics, history and science. The article draws on manuscripts in the collection of the John Rylands Library to argue that Uttley‘s version of history and time-travel was deeply indebted to her scientific education and her friendship with the Australian philosopher Samuel Alexander.

Bulletin of the John Rylands Library
Ian Rogerson

Edward Verrall Lucas (1868-1938) and Francis Meynell (1891-1975) were men of letters in the old-fashioned sense. They were indefatigable both in creating text and bringing like matter together in new and meaningful forms. Lucas was a journalist, anthologist and publisher. Meynell was a printer, anthologist and publisher, and also a poet of considerable sensitivity and charm. Lucas did not write much poetry but was passionate about its merits, and sought, through his collections, to bring children into contact with the best of verse. Today, the significant contributions that these men made to publishing in Britain are in danger of becoming forgotten, relegated to the minor byways of publishing history. This article examines the origins and connections between two hugely successful anthologies that were inspired by a growing public interest in, and engagement with, the English countryside.

Bulletin of the John Rylands Library
David Geiringer

contemporary source material to reconstruct Catholics women’s everyday experience of using NFP. For almost all the interviewees, ‘early marriage’ was a distinctive life-cycle stage which ran from engagement to the end of childrearing. Again, as with ‘later marriage’, the timings of this life-cycle stage varied from person to person and shifted over time. The interviewees universally spoke of early marriage as a

in The Pope and the pill
Abstract only
Stephen Penn

for Ludgershall), suggesting that Wyclif may already have been involved with the Crown by this time. His account of the proceedings of the Parliament of 1371 in the second book of On Civil Lordship ( 37 ), together with a gift of tithes from the king in that year, have prompted speculation that he had actively been involved in royal service even earlier. 31 On 26 July 1374, Wyclif was commissioned to travel to Bruges with six others for the purpose of discussing papal taxation of the clergy. This was his first known public engagement on

in John Wyclif
Carmen Mangion

monastery and advanced through the introduction of more participatory governance and less formal relationships. The full or partial cloister that had separated women religious from family, friends and the people they served underwent change in a movement from separateness to engagement. Embodied and physical spatial boundaries that had served to define female religious life were rethought and redefined in the decades after 1950. Though the divide between the cloister and the world was always to some degree permeable, the post-war re-evaluation of the conditions of that

in Catholic nuns and sisters in a secular age
Abstract only
Carmen Mangion

that urged an engagement with the modern world: adaptation, renewal and change. Female religious in Britain, weighed down by the reification of centuries of tradition, responded hesitantly. Then the 1960s: in the Church and in the world, ideas that had been slowly simmering began to bubble and sputter. The zeitgeist of the times was one of action. Expectations of a better world generated a radicalisation, religious and secular, explored and lived by laity, religious and priests. The Second Vatican Council (1962–1965) re-enforced that zeitgeist . New, more urgent

in Catholic nuns and sisters in a secular age
Hayyim Rothman

philosophical and theological reasons. For instance, God-seekers of the Solovyov circle were deeply indebted to the philosophy of F. W. J. Schelling (Vasilyev 2019 ). Its neoplatonic elements fit long-standing trends in the orthodox theology (Lossky 1976 , 29; Louth 1989 , 20–21; Vasilyev 2019 ). Its engagement with parallel kabbalistic notions attracted Jews (Franks 2019 ), attracted Russian Christians to Jewish thought (Kornblatt 1991 ; Burmistrov 2007a, b ; Daigin 2008 ), and attracted in tandem Jewish thinkers to Russian Orthodox theology

in No masters but God
Abstract only
Hayyim Rothman

into which the institution entered in the decade prior to its 1892 closure left (as I shall later elaborate) an indelible and shared mark on their understanding of Judaism, most notably, their deep engagement with Zionism, either for or against. Concretely, it would be more accurate to describe our ‘ minyan ’ as an artificial grouping of individuals who, under common religious, intellectual, and historical influences more or less independently turned to the Jewish intellectual heritage with similar questions and arrived at analogous conclusions as

in No masters but God
Carmen Mangion

life of the nuns and sisters. Relationships with family, friends, other religious and co-workers took on new dimensions. Ministry was rethought and some religious institutes moved away from the institutionally based work that had been so intrinsic to their mission and identity. A renewed emphasis on ecumenism reflected more openness and engagement with other forms of Christianity. These were some of the many revisions to religious life contested by various factions who were ‘for change’ or ‘against change’. This chapter examines another of these changes: governance

in Catholic nuns and sisters in a secular age