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Exhibiting the naval battles of the French Revolutionary and Napoleonic Wars
Eleanor Hughes

Horne Tooke. 8 Similarly, a competition was playing out in the exhibition spaces of the metropolis, between competing artists and forms of representation. The first opportunity for artists to depict a contemporary, full-scale naval engagement since the War of American Independence had ended a decade earlier, the battle also coincided with explorations of new ways to depict and exhibit naval triumph

in Exhibiting the empire

The 'Indian Room' label from Osterley's bell-pull system illustrates the economic and cultural aspects of the relationship between country houses and the British Empire. This book is a study of that relationship, of the ways in which country houses like Osterley served as venues for the expression of personal and national imperial engagement between 1700 and 1930. A rare scholarly analysis of the history of country houses that goes beyond an architectural or biographical study, and recognises their importance as the physical embodiments of imperial wealth and reflectors of imperial cultural influences, is presented. The book assesses the economic and cultural links between country houses and the Empire. In terms of imperial values, country houses expressed both the economic and cultural impact of empire. Carr and Gladstone were only two of the many examples of colonial merchants who turned landed magnates. Nabobs - men who made their fortunes either as employees of the East India Company or as 'free traders' in India - were willing to risk their lives in pursuit of wealth. Like nabobs, planters went to the colonies in search of wealth and were prepared to spend substantial time there in order to accumulate it. Military and naval were among categories of people who purchased landed estates with imperial wealth. The book identifies four discourses of empire - commodities, cosmopolitanism, conquest and collecting - that provided the basic categories in which empire was represented in country-house context.

Abstract only
Nicola Ginsburgh

of race and class in southern Africa stand to benefit from a critical engagement with whiteness scholarship developed in the United States. Recent research on colonial anxieties provides a useful framework to probe the Janus-faced nature of David Roediger’s ‘psychological wage’ and to provide an understanding of whiteness that reflects its complexities yet restores its utility. 59 Noel Ignatiev’s work on the Irish in the United States also provides a useful comparison with non-British whites in Rhodesia. Moreover, Theodore Allen’s argument that the modern notion

in Class, work and whiteness
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Museums and the British imperial experience

Recent cultural studies have demonstrated the weakness of some of the fashionable theoretical positions adopted by scholars of imperialism in recent times. This book explores the diverse roles played by museums and their curators in moulding and representing the British imperial experience. The British Empire yielded much material for British museums, particularly in terms of ethnographic collections. The collection of essays demonstrates how individuals, their curatorial practices, and intellectual and political agendas influenced the development of a variety of museums across the globe. It suggests that Thomas Baines was deeply engaged with the public presentation, display and interpretation of material culture, and the dissemination of knowledge and information about the places he travelled. He introduced many people to the world beyond Norfolk. A discussion of visitor engagement with non-European material cultures in the provincial museum critiques the assumption of the pervasive nature of curatorial control of audience reception follows. The early 1900s, the New Zealand displays at world's fairs presented a vision of Maoriland, which often had direct Maori input. From its inception, the National Museum of Victoria performed the dual roles of research and public education. The book also discusses the collections at Australian War Memorial, Zanzibar Museum, and Sierra Leone's National Museum. The amateur enthusiasms and colonial museum policy in British West Africa are also highlighted. Finally, the book follows the journey of a single object, Tipu's Tiger, from India back to London.

The metropole
Katie Donington

world, he subscribed to similar ideals of masculinity and family life, he even attended the same church as his abolitionist counterparts. George conformed to the dictates of polite middle-class society and in doing so visibly demonstrated the ways in which reputable English families were maintained by an engagement with the slave economy. Of course, his representation of his

in The bonds of family
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Slavery, commerce and culture in the British Atlantic world
Author: Katie Donington

Moving between Britain and Jamaica this book examines the world of commerce, consumption and cultivation created and sustained through an engagement with the business of slavery. Tracing the activities of a single extended family – the Hibberts – it explores how the system of slavery impacted on the social, cultural, economic and political landscape of Britain during the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. Integrating an analysis of the family as political and economic actors with an examination of their activities within the domestic and cultural sphere, the book provides an overview of the different ways in which slavery reshaped society both at home and out in the empire. From relatively humble beginnings in the cotton trade in Manchester, the Hibberts ascended through the ranks of Jamaica’s planter-merchant elite. During the abolition campaigns they were leading proslavery advocates and played a vital role in securing compensation for the slave owners. With a fortune built on slavery, the family invested in country houses, collecting, botany and philanthropy. Slavery profoundly altered the family both in terms of its social position and its intimate structure. The Hibberts’ trans-generational story imbricates the personal and the political, the private and the public, the local and the global. It is both the personal narrative of a family and an analytical frame through which to explore Britain’s participation in, and legacies of, transatlantic slavery. It is a history of trade, colonisation, exploitation, enrichment and the tangled web of relations that gave meaning to the transatlantic world.

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Family matters: Slavery, commerce and culture
Katie Donington

family, the book demonstrates how the Hibberts’ story imbricates the personal and the political, the private and the public, the local and the global. It is both the particular narrative of an extended family and a frame through which to negotiate Britain’s multifaceted engagement with the business of slavery. Commerce Family capitalism was the backbone of British business during

in The bonds of family
Abstract only
Katie Donington

and forth. In unravelling these tangled multi-generational relationships it is possible to trace the impact of the wealth generated by an early and lasting engagement with transatlantic slavery. The nature of the relationship between slavery and industrialisation has been long disputed. However, as Robert Bissett stated emphatically in 1805, the cotton economy relied ‘chiefly’ on

in The bonds of family
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Family legacies: after abolition
Katie Donington

questions of inequality in the present, we have to think about how inequalities are constituted by … historical processes, nationally and internationally.’ 21 This requires a fundamental re-evaluation of how we construct the past. Described by Bhambra as ‘reparative histories’, this process would force a critical engagement with ‘questions of violence and the appropriation of

in The bonds of family
The colony
Katie Donington

helped to cement the family’s place. These unions changed the nature of the Hibberts’ engagement with Jamaica: the island was no longer simply a place of commercial opportunity as relationships of flesh and blood reconfigured their ties to it, solidifying their status as a transatlantic family. Marriages with Creole women raised the issue of colonial difference. Robert junior’s mother Abigail was a key

in The bonds of family