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Britons and Irish imperial culture in nineteenth-century India
Barry Crosbie

promote the interests of a particular Gaelic Irish dimension within Anglo-Indian society. They ministered to the East India Company’s many Gaelic-speaking Irish soldiers; set about introducing a reconstructed parochial system in India which was, in part, modelled along post-emancipation Irish lines, through the building of churches and other ecclesiastical infrastructure; and promoted the education of

in The cultural construction of the British world
Abstract only
Lindsay J. Proudfoot and Dianne P. Hall

Anglo-Saxon bloodlines to an extent that renders any claim to an authentically Gaelic Irish identity meaningless, except as a reflexive act of the imagination. 81 Moreover, experience and memory also change, and so, accordingly, does the individual or community’s sense of ethnicity, which invokes both of these. Ethnic consciousness is thus performative, developmental and contingent on circumstance; which, of

in Imperial spaces
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The scattered Irish
Patrick O’Leary

Montgomery, who succeeded Lawrence as Punjab lieut.-governor, in consciously taking the same severe approach with mutineers as their ancestors did with Catholic, Gaelic Irish. James continues by quoting Sir William Kaye’s statement that these men were ‘familiar with the stirring watch-words of Derry: “No Surrender” ’. 50 Lawrence’s biographer, Charles Aitcheson, wrote, ‘the blood of

in Servants of the empire
Abstract only
Patrick O’Leary

be considered British, the very term Anglo-Irish, a description of themselves accepted by upper-middle-class and landed Protestants, 3 implied an identification with Britain and, in practice, entailed a tendency towards having an English accent and education. 4 Michael McConville, in explaining that the Old English component of Catholic Ireland had long been combined with the Gaelic Irish into a cultural

in Servants of the empire
Lindsay J. Proudfoot and Dianne P. Hall

church merely emphasised the connection between this denomination and Gaelic Irish ethnicity within the polyglot and multicultural spaces of this particular part of colonial Victoria. The mutually reinforcing connections between language, cultural memory and religious practice were also felt by the numerically smaller but still cohesive Scots Catholic migrant stream. The needs of some of the smaller Scots

in Imperial spaces