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Patrick Thornberry

necessarily identical in their nature or in the extent of their rights, and their nature depends upon the needs of the community. Throughout its history, the development of international law has been influenced by the requirements of international life, and the progressive increase in the collective action of States has already given rise to instances of action upon the international plane by certain entities which are not States.5 Leaving aside the arcane language of subjects and objects, a range of entities – States, international organisations, peoples, individuals

in Indigenous peoples and human rights
The quest for the right to science
Marco Cappato

, as well as legal restrictions, seem to change dramatically if, instead of seeking a cure, the ‘alteration’ of our consciousness is done just for the sake of it. This chapter will focus mainly upon the prohibition of narcotics and other psychoactive substances, and its impact on science. I will discuss how international organisations, particularly the United Nations, have intervened over the years to regulate and control the use and distribution of psychoactive substances. There are three main international conventions that deal with psychoactive substances. The

in The freedom of scientific research
Abstract only
David Keane and Annapurna Waughray

. It is distinct because it differs in its approach from other instruments and their monitoring bodies, regional and international. It is located principally in the dialogue with States parties and Concluding Observations that grow the State party’s obligations incrementally, the guiding and interpretive general recommendations that at times stretch the provisions of the treaty, the innovations in procedure that indicate that the monitoring process itself is subject to the doctrine, the integration of civil society voices at local and international organisational

in Fifty years of the International Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Racial Discrimination
Open Access (free)
Postcolonial governance and the policing of family
Author: Joe Turner

Bordering intimacy is a study of how borders and dominant forms of intimacy, such as family, are central to the governance of postcolonial states such as Britain. The book explores the connected history between contemporary border regimes and the policing of family with the role of borders under European and British empires. Building upon postcolonial, decolonial and black feminist theory, the investigation centres on how colonial bordering is remade in contemporary Britain through appeals to protect, sustain and make family life. Not only was family central to the making of colonial racism but claims to family continue to remake, shore up but also hide the organisation of racialised violence in liberal states. Drawing on historical investigations, the book investigates the continuity of colonial rule in numerous areas of contemporary government – family visa regimes, the policing of sham marriages, counterterror strategies, deprivation of citizenship, policing tactics, integration policy. In doing this, the book re-theorises how we think of the connection between liberal government, race, family, borders and empire. In using Britain as a case, this opens up further insights into the international/global circulations of liberal empire and its relationship to violence.

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Author: David Whyte

This book explains the direct link between the structure of the corporation and its limitless capacity for ecological destruction. It argues that we need to find the most effective means of ending the corporation’s death grip over us. The corporation is a problem, not merely because it devours natural resources, pollutes and accelerates the carbon economy. As this book argues, the constitutional structure of the corporation eradicates the possibility that we can put the protection of the planet before profit. A fight to get rid of the corporations that have brought us to this point may seem an impossible task at the moment, but it is necessary for our survival. It is hardly radical to suggest that if something is killing us, we should over-power it and make it stop. We need to kill the corporation before it kills us.

Open Access (free)
Élisabeth Anstett and Jean-Marc Dreyfus

corpses or other bodily remains, most often once the violence is over. The aim of the present volume, then, is precisely to examine this status and the factors at stake in its construction. Once episodes of mass violence and genocides come to an end, the resulting human remains become the subject of numerous and varied forms of investment. They are claimed by families and states and subjected to the attention of international organisations and the media. They may of course be forgotten, but they may equally be instrumentalised, placed in memorials or, to the contrary

in Human remains in society
Catherine Rhodes

Convention undertake to facilitate, and have the right to participate in, the fullest possible exchange of equipment, materials and scientific and technological information for the use of bacteriological (biological) agents and toxins for peaceful purposes. Parties to the Convention in a position to do so shall also cooperate in contributing individually or together with other States or international organisations to further development and application of scientific discoveries in the field of bacteriological (biological) for the prevention of disease, or for other

in The freedom of scientific research
Open Access (free)
Joe Turner

to show the violence of colonial rule and recover and forge new expressions of being in the world. Inversions In diverse environments, from migrant camp dispersals, to police stop and search, to protest movements, the use of photography to hold the state and its agents and international organisations to account has become increasingly powerful. Whether this is filming police violence (Wall and Linnemann 2014), or illegal detention practices, or physical and sexual abuse, photography is increasingly used to put pressure on states or to attempt to persecute

in Bordering intimacy
Patrick Thornberry

June 1999. 12 Para. 3. 13 The resolution (para. 4) also requested the Institute to prepare a report on the actions taken by other international organisations to promote the rights of indigenous populations. A ‘Report on the actions taken by other international organizations to promote the rights of indigenous peoples’ was presented to the Working Group. 14 The Report of the Chair of the Working Group is contained in Docs. OEA/ Ser.K/XVI, GT/DAdin/doc.5/99, 1 December 1999. The report contains a detailed account of procedures for indigenous participation. 15 The text

in Indigenous peoples and human rights
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Concept, definition, process
Patrick Thornberry

Group and Åbo Akademi, 1995). 12 All of these texts are discussed in later chapters. 34 Who is indigenous? political events and processes include the unravelling of the Soviet Union and Yugoslavia in the 1990s, with all the passions and suffering thereby unleashed. International organisations reacted at different speeds, depending upon political configuration and modus operandi. A thin array of specific standards in 1989 had been replaced by a panoply of minority rights in 2000.13 The discourse of minority rights impacts on indigenous peoples both positively and

in Indigenous peoples and human rights