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Author: Nigel D. White

International organisations are a central component of modern international society. This book provides a concise account of the principles and norms of international law applicable to the intergovernmental organisation (IGO). It defines and explains inter-governmentalism and the role of law in its regulation. The book presents case studies that show how the law works within an institutional order dominated by politics. After a note on the key relationship between the IGO and its member states, it examines the basic relationship between the UN and states in terms of membership through admissions, withdrawal, expulsion, suspension, and representation. The debate about the extent of the doctrine of legal powers is addressed through case studies. Institutional lawmaking in the modern era is discussed with particular focus on at the impact of General Assembly Resolutions on outer space and the Health Regulations of the World Health Organization. Non-forcible measures adopted by the UN and similar IGOs in terms of their legality (constitutionality and conformity to international law), legitimacy and effectiveness, is covered next. The different military responses undertaken by IGOs, ranging from observation and peacekeeping, to peace enforcement and war-fighting, are discussed in terms of legality and practice. The book also considers the idea of a Responsibility to Protect and the development of secondary rules of international law to cover the wrongful acts and omissions of IGOs. It ends with a note on how the primary and secondary rules of international law are upheld in different forms and mechanisms of accountability, including courts.

Nigel D. White

format of ARS 2001 by containing similar chapters and articles. In addition to articles on internationally wrongful acts, acts of organisations, attribution, breach of international obligations and the responsibility of an international organisation in connection with acts of state, reviewed earlier in the chapter, ARIO 2011 also contains useful chapters and articles on: circumstances precluding wrongfulness (consent, self-defence, countermeasures, force majeure , distress, necessity, and compliance with peremptory norms); 67 general principles on the content of the

in The law of international organisations (third edition)
Nigel D. White

This chapter explains what an inter-governmental organisation (IGO) is and why the UN is the leading example. A contrast will be made with other forms of organisation, particularly the supranational integration organisation (principally the EU). This chapter also defines the law of international organisations as the law governing, applicable to and produced by such organisations, and explains how this is best studied through a focus on the UN and related IGOs. The method used in the book is explained. This is not over-theorised given the textbook nature of the

in The law of international organisations (third edition)
Abstract only
Nigel D. White

From the outset, this text makes it clear that the law of international organisations is dominated by the UN and is actually best understood through a focus on that organisation. It defines and explains inter-governmentalism and the role of law in its regulation. The chapters in the new edition are not only re-ordered (with some merging), but have largely been rewritten with the insertion of a number of case studies that help to bring home how the law works within an institutional order dominated by politics. The case studies highlight the debates that surround

in The law of international organisations (third edition)
Costas Simitis

‘there was money’ meant that no preparation or planning was made with regard to Greece’s principal problem, the need both to fund and to reverse the exponential growth in the deficit. This problem was no secret: it had been noted in the reports of a range of international organisations, in the commentary of the foreign media and by certain sections within PASOK.3 Prime Minister G. Papandreou’s programme statement in Parliament on 16 October 2009 was a repetition of his pre-election promises. There was no indication of substantive developments in terms of policy, nor of

in The European debt crisis
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Simon Bulmer and Martin Burch

divergent goals of the European states was the Monnet method, set down most clearly in the May 1950 Schuman Plan. The guiding principle was that France and Germany would pool their coal and steel reserves, and their sovereignty over these resources, through a system of governance which would transcend the nation state. Other states were invited to join but the offer was only taken up by the Benelux states (Belgium, the Netherlands and Luxembourg) and Italy. The British government was ill-disposed towards such forms of international organisation and, having recently

in The Europeanisation of Whitehall
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Alistair Cole

European and foreign affairs are sometimes presented as the traditional ‘reserved domains’ of the French president, where decisions are reserved for the president (Irondelle, Joana and Mérand, 2016 ). The idea of a reserved domain is not literally true, of course, as there are many other actors involved in the European and international security policy communities, from the armed and security forces, through leaders in other countries, to actors in international organisations and think tanks. The formal machinery of government itself represents a

in Emmanuel Macron and the two years that changed France
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Bryan Fanning

adventures in nation-building Taiwan ranked 17th. On the fourth ‘political integration’ index, which tracked state membership of international organisations and ratification of international treaties, Ireland ranked 11th and Taiwan ranked as the lowest of all 62 countries included in the index. That Singapore ranked 2nd on the composite index for 2004 (high on economic integration, low on political and personal integration) suggests the need for caution about grouping all East Asian ‘tigers’ together.17 However, comparisons between Ireland and Taiwan reveal that Ireland

in Irish adventures in nation-building
Costas Simitis

nor the European economy. The discussion over restructuring Greek debt was, in essence, a discussion about ensuring the sustainability of debt and averting bankruptcy. The sustainability of debt is never a given, in any case. That is why the international organisations examined what would happen in the case of a Greek default, while Greece remained completely silent, both domestically and internationally, on the matter. The Maastricht Treaty set a maximum level for a country’s sover­eign debt at 60% of GDP. At such a level, debt can be serviced in an orderly way; it

in The European debt crisis
Nigel D. White

become a member. Despite the fact that the League’s membership rose to fifty-nine, a steady stream of withdrawals meant that by the time of its dissolution in 1946 it was reduced to forty members. 21 The world’s second attempt at establishing a global international organisation, the United Nations, was more successful. Article 3 of the UN Charter states that the ‘original Members of the United Nations shall be the States which, having participated in [the San Francisco conference], or having previously signed the Declaration by United Nations of 1 January 1942, sign

in The law of international organisations (third edition)