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Julius Caesar
Maria Wyke

In studio publicity, trade papers, reviews, articles, and educational materials, Joseph L. Mankiewiczs Julius Caesar (1953) was described and accepted as a faithful and mostly pleasing adaptation of Shakespearean drama to the Hollywood screen. As Variety accurately predicted, it achieved four Oscar nominations, one award for art direction and set decoration, high grosses, a hit soundtrack album, and several subsequent revivals. With the content more or less given, contemporary discussion focussed closely on how the verbal had been visualised, on how theatre had been turned into cinema – in short, on the film‘s style. It is with contemporary and subsequent readings of the film‘s style that this article is concerned, where, following David Bordwell, style is taken to mean ‘a films systematic and significant use of techniques of the medium’. But whereas Bordwell analyses film style directly in terms of an aesthetic history he considers to be distinct from the history of the film industry, its technology, or a films relation to society, I explore interpretations of one film‘s style that are heavily invested with socio-political meaning. If, in Bordwell‘s organic metaphor, style is the flesh of film, these readings of style explicitly dress that flesh in socio-political clothing. This analysis of Julius Caesar, then, is not another contribution to debates about adaptation, theatre on film, or Shakespeare on screen, but about the politics of film style.

Film Studies
Abstract only
Sam Rohdie

multiplicity and differential origins that it is a puzzle, not so much false, as incomprehensible, closest perhaps, to another parallel time zone narration, Orson Welles’s Mr Arkadin (1955). Welles, like Nolan, found his inspiration in Shakespeare, and, specifically, as Nolan did, in Macbeth and Julius Caesar, though there are also other Shakespeare citations in the Welles: Othello and Chimes at Midnight and the ubiquity of Wellesian (and Shakespearian) masquerade, trickery and false identities. Kilpatrick is in fact murdered, but at the hands of his friends not his enemies

in Film modernism
Sylvie Magerstädt

loss of exclusive rights to theatres, there would now be less opportunity to show their old films. The other way in which antiquity entered US television screens during this period was through individual episodes of other television programmes. The fantasy sitcom Bewitched (1964–72), for example, included an appearance of Julius Caesar (season 6, episode 3, ‘Samantha’s TV antiquity  23 Caesar Salad’). Most of the references to the ancient world, however, can be found, somewhat surprisingly, in science fiction programmes. For instance, ABC’s The Time Tunnel (1966

in TV antiquity
Sylvie Magerstädt

, which had previous experience in the genre with the production of Cleopatra (1999) only a year prior. The two-part miniseries followed trends set in the previous decades and ‘added contemporary references for its multi-cultural, post-feminist audience with a black Orpheus [and] Atalanta as a female Argonaut’ (Blanshard and Shahabudin, 2011: 132). It starred, among other notable actors, Derek Jacobi (the Claudius in I, Claudius) as Phineas and Ciarán Hinds (Rome’s Julius Caesar) as King Aeson. Yet despite the high-profile cast (Dennis Hopper also featured in the role

in TV antiquity
Musical comedy
R. S. White

. Although Mankiewicz’s Julius Caesar (1953) fits closely the criteria for Greco-Roman epics, it rarely features in studies on that subject, and is instead sidelined into the faintly antiquarian slot of ‘Shakespeare film’. A similar fate befell Warner Brothers’ 1935 A Midsummer Night’s Dream in relation to the Hollywood musical. If it were billed as written by any other

in Shakespeare’s cinema of love
Westworld
Elisabeth Bronfen

Stray’. 9 Ford is interrogating the host Teddy in the laboratory, where he has, once more, been reconstructed after yet another fatal encounter with a guest. As the camera moves back from an extreme close-up of the host’s eye, Ford’s voice-over, misquoting from Julius Caesar , exclaims, ‘the coward dies a thousand deaths, the valiant taste of death but once’. Adjusting the Roman senator’s remark to the situation at hand, Ford adds that Shakespeare, of course, never met a man quite like Teddy, whose courage has not dulled, even though he has died at least one

in Serial Shakespeare
Abstract only
Peter William Evans

My interest in Reed began, perhaps predictably, with The Third Man (1949). At school, films were shown every other Sunday evening. Over a period of five years my film education – already at a respectable level thanks to supervision by my mother – was further developed by screenings of a wide range of films, some wonderful, like The 3.10 to Yuma (1957), Shane (1953) and Julius Caesar (1953

in Carol Reed
Sylvie Magerstädt

deconstructs literary treatments of Caesar and Mark Antony in particular, appears at the start of season 2 (episode 1, ‘Passover’) in relation to Caesar’s funeral. It is arguable how many members of the audience will have a detailed knowledge of the funeral eulogies by Brutus and Mark Antony in Shakespeare’s play Julius Caesar. Yet, it is probably still one of the more well-known literary classics, as it is still required reading for many pupils on both sides of the Atlantic. In an insightful analysis, Angeline C. Chiu discusses the treatment of these iconic speeches. She

in TV antiquity
Corin Redgrave

. Corin Redgrave is an actor, director and author. Since his debut in 1962 his work has been divided almost evenly between theatre, film and television. He is the author of Michael Redgrave: My Father (RCB, Fourth Estate, 1995) and Julius Caesar and the English Revolution (Faber & Faber, 2002). As a playwright he has written Roy and Daisy (1998), Fool for the Rest of his

in British cinema of the 1950s
Abstract only
Shakespeare shaping modern movie genres
R. S. White

Poppins into a gay icon. Elizabeth (Jessie Matthews) delivers clothes for a fashion house, yearns to be a singer, but fails an audition. So does aspiring Shakespearean actor Victor (Sonnie Hale), who introduces the first of numerous Shakespearean quotations with a speech from Julius Caesar delivered in a failed audition. A born loser, Victor is offered a part as a female impersonator in a music hall

in Shakespeare’s cinema of love