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John Harris

is exercised, not why it is, is what changes the world. The distinction I am trying to make here is well articulated, as so often, by William Shakespeare. Here is his use of it in Julius Caesar. Caesar is responding to Decius Brutus who has come to escort him to the Senate and to his murder. Caesar tells him to tell the senate he will not come today … CAESAR Decius, go tell them Caesar will not come. DECIUS Most mighty Caesar, let me know some cause, Lest I be laughed at when I tell them so. CAESAR The cause is in my will: I will not come; That is enough to satisfy

in From reason to practice in bioethics
John Harris

, be a life worth living.19 Ch 18, Raanan Gillon Raanan reminds me in his chapter of how our long friendship began, and how he set me on the road to bioethics; circumstances I have related in my opening chapter of this volume. It is therefore a special pleasure to end by engaging with him again in this final commentary and by discussing, albeit briefly, a theme which I have held to since I first became interested in phil­ osophy. Symmetry has a special appeal to human beings, as Shakespeare has Cassius say in the final scenes of Julius Caesar: …Time is come round

in From reason to practice in bioethics
Open Access (free)
Rodney Barker

Bill Rolston, Drawing Support 2: Murals of War and Peace (Belfast: Beyond the Pale, 1995). 17 William Shakespeare, ‘Julius Caesar’, in The Complete Work s, edited by Stanley Wells and Gary Taylor (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1986), Act III, Scene 2. 18 Taylor, Hegel , pp. 153

in Cultivating political and public identity
Open Access (free)
Rodney Barker

, and within each way of getting about. The range from steerage to the captain's table, or from one class of plane or train to another, can be paralleled even within simple walking. Romans characterised each other by their gait, and even their names reflected this. Gait was taken to be characteristic of social position, slaves hurrying and nobler Romans proceeding in a leisurely and dignified manner. Even families could be identified by how they moved, and Cleopatra's son Caesarion was deemed a genuine offspring of Julius Caesar by the way he walked. 34 Whether

in Cultivating political and public identity