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E.J. Clery and Robert Miles

, should the monarch threaten their ancient rights. There were two important classical sources for the political debate on the Goths. One was Julius Caesar’s De Bello Gallico (Commentaries on The Gallic War); the other, longer and more influential source was the Germania of Tacitus. 1 John Aikin, the translator of the edition used here, 2 was, perhaps not incidentally, both a

in Gothic documents
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The most Gothic of acts – suicide in generic context
William Hughes and Andrew Smith

conspirators against all that is sincere and honourable. 6 This is a rich passage, and one with implications that extend far beyond its allusions to the reputation of, and conspiracy against, another celebrated politician as depicted in Shakespeare’s Julius Caesar . 7 ‘Poor’, in context, refers to the politically unfortunate as well as comparatively penurious position of the two emblematical radicals – these latter being figures for whom the suicidal statesman would doubtless have found little

in Suicide and the Gothic
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Hamlet and early modern stage ghosts
Elisabeth Bronfen and Beate Neumeier

addressed to the ghost of Caesar only slightly earlier: ‘Art thou some god, some angel, or some devil / That mak’st my blood cold, and my hair to stare? / Speak to me what thou art’ ( Julius Caesar 4.3.276–8). 7 How were they to be understood, these figures who deconstructed the opposition between life and death? Were they bodies back from the grave, or spirits now divorced from the

in Gothic Renaissance
Elisabeth Bronfen and Beate Neumeier

critique of supernaturalism in the Letters , in fact, had used Shakespeare’s three notable renditions of supernatural activity in Macbeth , Hamlet and Julius Caesar to foreclose upon the ghost’s very existence. The dramatic suspension of ghostly disbelief opened up by Shakespeare, and thoroughly exploited by the Gothic, is closed down in Scott’s rationalist account of the

in Gothic Renaissance
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Elisabeth Bronfen and Beate Neumeier

! – ’Tis nothing but my melancholy. (5.3.344–47) Where in Shakespeare the motive for the appearance of a revenant from the past is made explicit, as in the case of the appearance of Old Hamlet’s ghost, or the ghost of Julius Caesar in the earlier play, in Webster such ‘historical’ explanations are never clear and the

in Gothic Renaissance
Nightmares, conscience and the ‘Gothic’ self in Richard III
Elisabeth Bronfen and Beate Neumeier

individual transgression interrogating the uncertain bounds of imaginative freedom and human knowledge’ ( Gothic 10). 15 For example, in the account of Calpurnia’s dream in Julius Caesar , which is given two markedly different kinds of significance: either that Caesar

in Gothic Renaissance
Ben Jonson’s Masque of Queenes
Elisabeth Bronfen and Beate Neumeier

Shakespeare is a natural starting point for a ‘preposterous history’ of the Gothic mode (Bal). In the preface to The Castle of Otranto: A Gothic Story (1764), Horace Walpole describes him as ‘the model I copied’ (44), and Ann Radcliffe refers to Julius Caesar , Hamlet and Macbeth in her essay ‘On the Supernatural in Poetry’ to

in Gothic Renaissance
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Romances, novels, and the classifications of Irish Romantic fiction
Christina Morin

Mortimer Stanhope first visits Woodville Hall and meets both Sophia and her guardian, he is struck by the mistaken and ludicrous understanding of the past displayed by Woodville: ‘In short, he jumbled Normans, Danes, Saxons, and Britons together, till at length he arrived at the Romans, and from them he called out no less a person than Julius Caesar himself, for the head of his family’ ( The convent , vol. 1, p. 64). No less ridiculous than Woodville is his second daughter, Eleanor. ‘[I]ndebted for all her knowledge to an ignorant country school

in The gothic novel in Ireland, c. 1760–1829
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Enlightenment, automata, and the theatre of terror
Victor Sage

ancient superstitious terror: Diderot’s editors do not say so, but I take the ‘wicker mannequin’ to be an allusion to Julius Caesar’s description of the Druidic practice of human sacrifice amongst the Celts (Caesar 1963 : 340-341). The audience, as we say, ‘identifies with’ (that is, structurally, imitates) the actor’s pretence – that is, his sacrifice of his humunculoid self (see Figure 1 ). But

in European Gothic
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History and the Gothic in the eighteenth century
Jonathan Dent

England was published between 1754 and 1762; the first volume covered the period 1603–49 and was followed by further volumes covering the sixteenth century and two covering the period from Julius Caesar to Henry VII. Hume was initially known as a philosopher, but his multi-volume history met with great acclaim and established his reputation much more firmly than his philosophical works had done. Hume

in Sinister histories