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Andrew McRae and John West

parliament had joined them in the sovereignty, they could not be disjoined in their coin, and I doubted not but their fortunes would be alike, good or bad. When I received the reverse, I was heated into an indignation that any person should be so indiscreet as to choose an emblem upon such an occasion so subject to misinterpretation as this would be. For as Julius Caesar said to his wife Calpurnia, that it was not enough that she should be innocent, but that she ought to be so cautious in all her actions, that she should be free even from suspicion.16 So ought it to be

in Literature of the Stuart successions
The theatre of madness
Stuart Elden

these resources in Macbeth to make his point, his discussion is also notable because it is the one place that he talks about Shakespeare’s Julius Caesar . His focus is specifically the dream of Calpurnia which ‘foretells the death of Caesar: a dream which speaks no less of the entire power and freedom of the imperator who shakes the world – in the interpretation of Decius

in Foucault’s theatres
‘The Platonic differential’ and ‘Zarathustra’s laughter’
Mischa Twitchin

repetition, like a parody of Julius Caesar , beginning (as already noted) with Plato himself in the attempt to decide between the mask of Socrates and the Sophist. The cast also includes Duns Scotus – who appears ‘sporting an impressive moustache […] belong[ing] to Nietzsche, disguised as Klossowski’. 21 Indeed, amongst Foucault’s philosophical personae, it is this particular

in Foucault’s theatres
Peter Barry

Hamlet on the former list because of its treatment of ‘corruption and justice’, while Julius Caesar and Coriolanus were on the latter because they allegedly ‘glorified dictatorship’. Thus the play itself becomes an element in the process of surveillance in the specific circumstances of the immediate aftermath of the Second World War. Hawkes then goes into the use of stages and acting within the play, and then weaves in the true-life story of the Jewish actor Mauriz Leon Reiss, who in 1930s Nazi Germany constructed a whole new non-Jewish identity for himself which

in Beginning theory (fourth edition)