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Simon MacLean

REGINO OF PRÜM’S CHRONICLE HERE BEGINS THE PREFACE TO THE FOLLOWING WORK To the lord Bishop Adalbero, 1 a man of the highest abilities distinguished in manifold ways through the pursuit of every type of philosophy, Regino, although the lowest of Christ’s worshippers, in all things most devoted

in History and politics in late Carolingian and Ottonian Europe
The Chronicle of Regino of Prüm and Adalbert of Magdeburg
Author: Simon MacLean

The career, mental world and writings of Regino, abbot of Prüm, were all defined by the Carolingian empire and, more particularly, by its end. The high Ottonian period of the mid-tenth century also witnessed a revival of historiography, exemplified by the work of the two major authors who wrote about the rise of the dynasty. The first of these was Liutprand of Cremona, whose Antapodosis, a history of European politics from 888 until around 950, and Historia Ottonis, a focused account of events surrounding Otto's imperial coronation, were both written in the earlier 960s. The second was Adalbert, who most probably wrote his continuation to the Chronicle in 967/968. Regino's Chronicle, dedicated to Bishop Adalbero of Augsburg in the year 908, was the last work of its kind for several decades, and as such its author can be regarded as the last great historian of the Carolingian Empire. The Chronicle is divided into two books. The first, subtitled 'On the times of the Lord's incarnation', begins with the incarnation of Christ and proceeds as far as the death of Charles Martel in 741. The second 'On the deeds of the kings of the Franks' takes the story from the death of Charles Martel through to 906. The much shorter continuation by Adalbert of Magdeburg enjoys a place in the canon of works relating to the history of the earliest German Reich and consequently has received considerably more attention.

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I.S. Robinson

literary model: the description of the encounter of King Lothar II and Pope Hadrian II in 869 in the chronicle of Regino of Prüm. 217 The theatricality of the event reported by Regino clearly appealed to Lampert and seemed exactly to correspond to his conception of the momentous confrontation of king and pope that concluded his Annals . Above all it gave him the opportunity to dramatise the exposure

in The Annals of Lampert of Hersfeld
I.S. Robinson

This chapter contains the text of Annals of Lampert, translated and annotated by I.S. Robinson.

in The Annals of Lampert of Hersfeld
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Andrew Rabin

collections of Regino of Prüm, Abbo of Fleury, and Burchard of Worms: assemblages of ecclesiastical law and custom that exploited patristic as readily as decretal or conciliar prescriptions’. 99 Indeed, it is striking that the manuscripts of the ‘commonplace book’ family draw no distinction between different genres of text and freely intermingle legal and homiletic material. The blending of genres

in The political writings of Archbishop Wulfstan of York
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Timothy Reuter

overloaded the commentary. Difficulties of translation are noted, as are references to the same events in other sources; where appropriate, excerpts from these, in particular from Regino of Prüm’s Chronicon , have been translated in the notes. The information given by AF on the movements of rulers has been supplemented by that revealed in the dating-clauses of royal diplomata, though the reign of Louis the German in particular

in The Annals of Fulda
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Rachel Stone and Charles West

have, however, cited directly translations of the Annals of St-Bertin , Annals of Fulda and Regino of Prüm’s Chronicle , which are already available in the Manchester Medieval Sources series (and have not given page numbers for the Latin text of these sources). 1 Response 3: 122

in The divorce of King Lothar and Queen Theutberga
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Andrew Rabin

a specific prohibition on oaths, ordeals, and executions. Although Wulfstan’s source for the ban on oaths and ordeals remains unknown (if he had one at all), the ban on executions is likely of Carolingian origin, as similar injunctions are found in the acts of the Synod of Mainz as well as in the works of Regino of Prüm and Burchard of Worms. See

in The political writings of Archbishop Wulfstan of York
Graham A. Loud

occasionally mentioned in the text. The earlier sections of these annals are almost entirely derivative, although they display very wide reading, and the use of a very large number of earlier historical works, on the part of the author. The earlier sections rely especially on the work of Regino of Prüm, Thietmar of Merseburg and Ekkehard of Aura. Only the account after 1124, which is

in Roger II and the creation of the Kingdom of Sicily
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Jonathan R. Lyon

. 12 Ottonian Germany: the chronicon of Thietmar of Merseburg ; Widukind of Corvey, Deeds of the Saxons ; Liudprand of Cremona, The complete works ; Queenship and sanctity: the lives of Mathilda and the epitaph of Adelheid ; History and politics in late Carolingian and Ottonian Europe: the chronicle of Regino of Prüm and

in Noble Society