Search results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 14 items for :

  • "Reparations" x
  • Manchester Literature Studies x
  • All content x
Clear All
Abigail Ward

appetite for the exotic, if it means that I can get some royalties here and there. As to the British guilt for the Empire which translates into book buying and prize giving, I’ll gladly jostle in the queue for handouts and reparations. (I’ve even contemplated writing a sombre novel on slavery to cash in on White angst.) 48 However much his comments are meant ironically, Dabydeen nevertheless seems quick to draw distinct racial lines, especially when referring to the apparent desire of white readers to consume ‘exotic’ literature, leading to his

in Caryl Phillips, David Dabydeen and Fred D’Aguiar
Arcadia (1992) and Signals of Distress (1994)
Philip Tew

scientific view that every offence – Mr Phipps might call it sin – should be settled only by reparations of an equal force,’” (153) emphasizing the disproportion of everything concerning Howells, including his tithe on virtually all activities in the locality. Clumsy as he is, Aymer offers a sense of proportion and equity. The rest of the day is engaged at Dry Manston in the corralling of the cattle and the removal of the Belle from the bar, followed by a night-time celebration with dancing. Excited by dancing with Katie, and slightly drunk, Aymer “lay awake and tried to

in Jim Crace
Abstract only
Peter Redford

health and of often writing. Which when I desire from you I promise to you. farwell. Hand P. (Q. Aurelii Symmachi, Book 1, letter 5, to his father, pp. 5–6.) Commentary 9.4.2. Prostina: Symmachus has ‘Praenestina’, Palestrina, a small town about 18 miles east of Rome. o 10v 20 (Marginal note: 1.11.) Sir. It is my fortune that wheresoever I sett my foote some point of building streight presents it self unto me: as now the reparations of oCap: puts me into great charges. part of which is delayed thorough negligence: part lately repayred in hast and somewhat carelessly

in The Burley manuscript
Abstract only
The Voortrekker Monument and Freedom Park
Yvette Hutchison

was the suggestion that the government should provide monuments and memorials as symbolic forms of reparation, alongside financial reparations to victims and their families. In 1999 Nelson Mandela formulated the dream that was to be realised in Freedom Park: ‘The day should not be far off, when we shall have a people’s shrine, a freedom park, where we shall honour with all the dignity they deserve, those who endured pain so we should experience the joy of freedom’. The project was proposed in 1998, and then allocated 52 hectares on Salvokop, opposite the Voortrekker

in South African performance and archives of memory
Susan Ireland

. In contrast, their daughter Leïla, who stands for the next generation of harkis, serves as the primary figure of rebellion against the status quo. Her resistance takes three main forms: her role in the demand for material reparations, her desire to put an end to her marginalization in French society, and her challenging traditional gender roles. First, when Leïla discovers that the harki families are not receiving the full 300 francs of their family allowance, she goes to talk to the camp director, seeking ‘notre argent et la justice pour les harkis’ (our money and

in Reimagining North African Immigration
Yvette Hutchison

, forgiveness and national unity. As already discussed, symbolic reparations in the form of new cultural commemorations were intrinsic to this process, insofar as they translated specific aspects of the oral histories into concrete embodiments of the redefined narrative of South African history, while also addressing ongoing issues of loss and the need for mourning. From the election of the transitional Government of National Unity, multiculturalism was advocated in South Africa, which was celebrated as being ‘one nation, many cultures’. ‘Unity in diversity’ formed the basis

in South African performance and archives of memory
Yvette Hutchison

specific embodied persona. These theatrical performances, exhibitions and cyber engagements suggest that memory and history are fundamental to how South Africans are negotiating what is remembered and forgotten, and thereby ‘writing’ and performing themselves in the present. Conclusion It is clear that the attempt to get South Africans to engage with their various memories of the past and thus revise ways in which people engage with one another in the present through the TRC, symbolic reparations, including various memorial projects, and the African 42 See Maingard

in South African performance and archives of memory
Postmemory and identity in harki and pied noir narratives
Véronique Machelidon

–4) By including harki associations and their representatives in their various manifests, pied noir spokespeople have managed to reinforce their demands on different French governments for material reparations and for an open 172 Reimagining North African immigration recognition of the French authorities’ responsibility in the past tragedy which affected all North African expatriates. A March 2007 proclamation or charte nationale issued by the Comité de liaison des associations nationales de rapatriés and signed both by pied noir and harki representatives, finishes

in Reimagining North African Immigration
Andrew Frayn

from decade to decade’.4 The British popular press was in bullish mood, aligning itself with the French Prime Minister Clemenceau’s demand for full monetary reparations, while Lloyd George’s prescient view that too 78 Writing disenchantment: First World War prose harsh a peace would lead to further conflict was marginalised by triumphalism.5 The enchantments of victory seemed to validate the narrative of progress which had been threatened by the war. Those enchantments existed alongside and were soon felt subsumed by the problems of reintegration. For soldiers

in Writing disenchantment
Andrew Frayn

were forced on him by the dismal & degrading spectacle of the Peace Congress, where men played shamelessly, not for Europe, or even England, but for their own return to Parliament at the next election.’94 Keynes’s enchantments are negated by the greed both of the reparations and the self-promotion of those who conducted negotiations. Gone is the paternalism of Victorian politics, replaced by a naked Modernism, conflict and the home front, 1922–27 139 Figure 3.1  The Peace Day parade in London, 1919 self-interest. The Manchester Guardian’s editorial also noted

in Writing disenchantment