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Series: Pocket Politics
Author: Edward Ashbee

This book explores how a candidate who broke with almost every single norm governing candidate behaviour, appeared to eschew the professionalised forms of campaigning, and who had been more or less disowned by Republican elites, prove victorious? The focus is on Trump and his campaign; the account does not go beyond the November election and its immediate aftermath. The book argues that the Trump campaign, like earlier populist insurgencies, can be explained in part by considering some defining features of US political culture and, in particular, attitudes towards government. It explains the right-wing populism that has been a recurrent and ingrained feature of the political process over a long period. The book discusses structural characteristics of the American state that appear to be of particular significance in shaping attitudes, as well as some other ideas and frames brought to the forefront by the Trump campaign during the course of 2015 and 2016. It also considers the shifts and swings amongst voters and suggests that these, alongside ideas about the state and the 'entrepreneurial' efforts of the campaign, form part of the explanation for Trump's eventual victory. The book assesses Trump's ascendancy as a function of, and reaction to, the strategies and discourses pursued in the years preceding 2016 by Republican Party elites. 'Trumpism' and European forms of populism are still in some ways weakly embedded but they may intensify the battles and processes of group competition between different constituencies.

Abstract only
Edward Ashbee

another line of explanation. It assesses Trump's ascendancy as a function of, and reaction to, the strategies and discourses pursued in the years preceding 2016 by Republican Party elites. Arguably, Trump's victory was the product of a chain reaction. In other words, it may be that Republican elites, through the discourses that they adopted in pursuit of given electoral logics , set off particular sets of reactive sequences that culminated, over time, in the emergence of the Trump campaign. The concept of reactive sequences is a form of path dependence. Nonetheless

in The Trump revolt
Abstract only
Edward Ashbee

did a candidate who broke with almost every single norm governing candidate behaviour, appeared to eschew the professionalised forms of campaigning that have been adopted in recent years, and who had been more or less disowned by Republican elites, prove victorious? This book seeks to answer that question. It argues that the Trump campaign, like earlier populist insurgencies, can be explained in part by considering some defining features of US political culture and, in particular, attitudes towards government. Having said that, ‘culture’ is a term that must

in The Trump revolt
Edward Ashbee

’. These were exposed in their most visible form during efforts by Tea Partiers to dislodge Republican incumbents, most notably the defeat of House Majority Leader Eric Cantor in June 2014. Having said that, the term ‘establishment’ (which was popularized by the movement and figures such as former Alaska governor, Sarah Palin) should be used with caution. There are certainly Republican elites. Some are based in particular institutional locations, most notably Congress or the different state legislatures. Others control funding or the campaigning and mobilizing resources

in The Right and the recession
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Nadia Kiwan

Republican elites what they want to hear? If this is the case, then it would mean that these intellectuals correspond to the Gramscian notion of intellectuals who reproduce cultural hegemony, since they seem to operate within a broader narrative of consensus:  consensus about the desirability of laïcité, universalism and the legacy of the Enlightenment. However, as Chantal Mouffe (2013) argues, the danger in consensus is that it can produce a sort of ‘post-​politics’ or ‘post-​democracy’ whereby the absence of ‘agonistic’ or positive conflict between different sections of

in Secularism, Islam and public intellectuals in contemporary France
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Edward Ashbee

Republican elites generally kept Trump at arm's length. Nonetheless, as early voting took place and the election drew near many Republican and Republican-leaning voters clearly decided that, whatever their reservations, criticisms and dislike of Trump they would back him. They may well have been heavily represented among the large numbers (13 per cent) who were late deciders and only came to a conclusion in the final week before Election Day. In the end 90 per cent of voters defining themselves as Republican voted for Trump (fractionally higher than the proportion of

in The Trump revolt
Bilge Firat

People’s Party) during the 3 November 2002 general election. That election resulted in a coalition government being replaced by the AKP. The coalition had undertaken some initial reforms and had paved the road for EU–Turkey accession talks to begin, as they did under the Turkey.indb 6 24/07/2019 17:31:20 The elephant in the room 7 AKP. A few years later, Leyla would write: ‘Europe will enhance its multicultural identity with Turkey’. Her optimism, though, was not without a hint of caution, since she belonged to modern Turkey’s founder Ataturk’s republican elites

in Diplomacy and lobbying during Turkey’s Europeanisation
Edward Ashbee

organize. They also set the stage for the ensuing Rallying around the Gadsden Flag 107 battles between Congressional Republicans and the administration, including the federal government shutdown of October 2013. The Ryan Plan The book has sought to show how outcomes are shaped through the processes of interaction between those levels or tiers described in the different literatures outlined in the Introduction. In particular, there have been tensions between the constituencies that came together in the Tea Party movement, the Republican elites (particularly those in

in The Right and the recession
Abstract only
Edward Ashbee

forward plans for the partial privatisation of Medicare. Yet, in striking contrast to Republican elites, the Trump campaign echoed grassroots sentiments and in a promise that may have played a part in winning white working-class votes said in tones that were sometimes equivocal and sometimes definite, it would protect these programmes. This gave the campaign, at least at times, a leftist hue in the same way as the European populist parties sometimes appear to talk in terms more usually associated with social democracy. Although in part a tongue-in-cheek exercise, an

in The Trump revolt