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Essays on text and context

This collection of sixteen essays, the first devoted to John Derricke’s work, offers new readings of, and new sources behind, The Image of Irelande: With a Discoverie of Woodkarne (1581), all to better explicate facets of this difficult and complex book. While prior scholarship on Derricke was largely confined to commentary on the illustrations, the essays in this volume encompass a broad range of approaches to the Image of Irelande in its entirety. Although on the face of it, The Image is blatantly pro-Sidney and anti-Irish propaganda, and has always been so received, the essays in this collection combine to suggest that Derricke’s book is in fact far more culturally and politically daring than has been assumed, with a highly sophisticated textual and visual presentation only now brought into focus. In addition to scrutinizing Derricke’s poetic and iconographic practices, the essays include insights from architecture and archaeology, print history and reading practices, studies of civic display and colonial ideologies. The collection, divided into five sections (Ideologies, Archaeologies, Print and publication, Influences, and Interpretations), establishes a basis on which to build future analyses of Derricke’s enigmatic book.

James Lyttleton

). 74 Stuart Kinsella, ‘Colonial Commemoration in Tudor Ireland, the Case of Sir Henry Sidney’, Sidney Journal 29:1–2 (2011), 105–45, at pp. 113–8 and 127–30. 75 Bradley, ‘Sir Henry Sidney’s Bridge’, p. 190. 76 Bradley, ‘Sir Henry Sidney’s Bridge’, p. 190. 77 Bradley, ‘Sir Henry Sidney’s Bridge’, p. 190. 78 Bradley, ‘Sir Henry Sidney’s Bridge’, p. 178

in John Derricke’s The Image of Irelande: with a Discoverie of Woodkarne
Discovering the formal and figurative texture of Derricke’s Image of Irelande
Matthew Woodcock

John Derricke’s Image of Irelande is regularly mined by historians and critics interested in its ethnographic observations, propagandistic pro-Sidney agenda and the informative detail of its woodcut illustrations. Little has been written, however, about the formal, stylistic and rhetorical aspects of the text itself, and of the confection of verse modes Derricke brings together. This chapter addresses this situation by examining Derricke’s employment of an elaborate vatic compositional fiction, multiple metrical forms and narratorial standpoints, and a distinct set of rhetorical devices (in particular analogy and antithesis). It poses questions about Derricke’s fundamental decision to anatomise his subject using poetry rather than prose, and about the place of allegory or figura in the text, and it considers some of the different generic models he may have had in mind when exploring the role and interplay of words, images and action in both the maintenance and representation of order in Tudor Ireland.

in John Derricke’s The Image of Irelande: with a Discoverie of Woodkarne
John Derricke versus Edmund Spenser
Brian C. Lockey

Any discussion of Tudor Ireland and the New World should begin with the question of whether Ireland was an English colony or rather an integral, albeit outlying and rebellious, kingdom within a unified composite monarchy. This question, on which there is considerable debate, is important to understanding whether the English presence in Tudor Ireland should be seen as the mature phase of English state formation or part of the first stages in English overseas imperial expansionism. On the one hand, David

in John Derricke’s The Image of Irelande: with a Discoverie of Woodkarne
Martial identities and the subject of conquest in Derricke’s Image of Irelande
Maryclaire Moroney

University Press, 1996), pp. 136–59. 7 Hammer, Elizabeth’s Wars , p. 71. A detailed analysis of training, recruitment, and supplies for Elizabethan forces in Ireland is offered by John McGurk, The Elizabethan Conquest of Ireland: the 1590s Crisis (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 1997). 8 Brady, ‘The Captains’ Games’, p. 151 and Ciaran Brady, The Chief Governors: the Rise and Fall of Reform Government in Tudor Ireland, 1536–1588 (Cambridge

in John Derricke’s The Image of Irelande: with a Discoverie of Woodkarne
Essex and Ireland
Chris Butler and Willy Maley

Morgan, Tyrone’s Rebellion: The Outbreak of the Nine Years War in Tudor Ireland (Woodbridge: Boydell, 1993), p. 21. 26 Morgan, Tyrone’s Rebellion , p. 53. 27 Morgan, Tyrone’s Rebellion , p. 51

in Essex
Abstract only
Thomas Herron, Denna J. Iammarino, and Maryclaire Moroney

Fall of Reform Government in Tudor Ireland, 1536–1588 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1994), pp. 122–3. 12 Vincent Carey, ‘John Derricke’s Image of Irelande , Sir Henry Sidney, and the Massacre at Mullaghmast’, Irish Historical Studies 31 (1999), pp. 305–27. 13 In November 1575, Sidney recommended that the Crown grant O’Neill the titles he requested, arguing that nobilitation would, ironically, lead to ‘the dissipation of his strength, and

in John Derricke’s The Image of Irelande: with a Discoverie of Woodkarne
Sir Henry Sidney’s return to Dublin as depicted in Derricke’s Image of Irelande
Bríd McGrath

Commemoration in Tudor Ireland: The Case of Sir Henry Sidney’, Sidney Journal 29:1–2 (2011), pp. 105–45. 3 M. Moroney, ‘“The Sweetness of Due Subjection”: John Derricke’s Image of Irelande (1581) and the Sidneys’, Sidney Journal 29:1–2 (2011), pp. 147–71. 4 P. Schwyzer, ‘“A Happy Place of Government”: Sir Henry Sidney, Wales, and the Historie of Cambria (1584)’, Sidney Journal 29:1–2 (2011), pp. 209–45. 5 H

in John Derricke’s The Image of Irelande: with a Discoverie of Woodkarne
Derricke, paratext, and poetic reception
Denna J. Iammarino

. 31 Derricke, Image of Irelande , p. 10. 32 Knapp, ‘The most barbarous Nacion’, p. 416. For more on the complexity of Elizabethan reform in Ireland, see Nicholas Canny, The Elizabethan Conquest of Ireland: A Pattern Established, 1565–1576 (Hassocks, Sussex: Harvester Press, 1976); Willy Maley, Salvaging Spenser: Colonialism, Culture, and Identity (London: Macmillian, 1997); Ciaran Brady, ‘The Road to the View: On the Decline of Reform Thought in Tudor Ireland’, in

in John Derricke’s The Image of Irelande: with a Discoverie of Woodkarne
Abstract only
Derricke, Dürer, and Foxe
Thomas Herron

. 72). 39 Stuart Kinsella, ‘Colonial Commemoration in Tudor Ireland: The Case of Sir Henry Sidney’. Sidney Journal 29:1–2 (2011), pp. 103–39, at pp. 125–7. According to Ciaran Brady and James Murray, Sidney ‘was determined to see the repair of church fabric and drafted legislation [in 1569] to ensure that both clergy and laity assumed their responsibility in this regard’. This was but one element of a ‘coherent reformation strategy’. Brady and Murray, ‘Sir Henry Sidney and

in John Derricke’s The Image of Irelande: with a Discoverie of Woodkarne