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An epilogue
Saurabh Dube

, abstract reason and religious truth, and governmental authority and popular politics. There are parallels here with modernist initiatives elsewhere. On the other hand, South Asian endeavors equally sieved such concerns through distinct expressions of modernism, at once querying the colonial connection with a (generally bourgeois) modern, articulating the national dynamic with an (often avant-garde

in Subjects of modernity
Paul K. Jones

area. Béla Bartók anticipated such criticisms in his 1944 critique of ‘race purity in music’. He argued the race-national interpretation of restricted traditions were qualitatively inferior musically to the result of ‘impure’ intermixing of formerly peasant musics. 16 Adorno wrote approvingly in 1948 of Bartok's folk-influenced compositions in similar terms: ‘In contrast to the productions of Nazi blood and soil ideology, truly extra-territorial music … has a power of alienation that associates it with the avant-garde

in Critical theory and demagogic populism
Open Access (free)
Andrew Bowie

investment in many forms of art, including, of course, avant-garde ‘anti-art’ itself. If all this seems rather confusing, now consider the following very different aspect of contemporary thought’s relationship to questions of subjectivity, of the kind which I have tried to show are inextricably linked to aesthetics. Philosophers who regard aesthetic and other culture as part of the realm of ‘folk psychology’ – by which they mean our everyday ways of thinking about ourselves and our minds that cognitive science is supposed eventually to replace with a physicalist explanatory

in Aesthetics and subjectivity
Thomas Osborne

progression towards more and more autonomy from the social world. This is mirrored in a concern more and more for form rather than content, until we get to the complete ‘art for art’s sake’ or self-referential mentalities of much modernist art, the pure gaze: the autonomisation of art from its social conditions (but itself a social achievement) and the relative autonomisation of artists from patrons and ultimately – as with later avant-gardes – even from audiences themselves. Take Bourdieu’s analysis of Flaubert and, before him, Baudelaire and the initial

in The structure of modern cultural theory
Andrew Bowie

-causing cigarette.6 Aestheticisation of commodities creates an increasingly difficult situation for serious artists who have often responded to it with a revolt against sensuous beauty. Their need is to escape complicity with the adding of aesthetic pleasure to exchange values and thus to sustain the notion of art as being independent of appropriative interest and as a continuing challenge to established ways of seeing. This is one root of the emergence of avant-garde art, which tries to escape existing forms of communication and often makes no attempt to be sensuously pleasing. In

in Aesthetics and subjectivity
Steven Earnshaw

impressionism in Jean Rhys’s Quartet’, in Elke Mettinger, Margarete Rubik and Jörg Türschmann (eds), Rive Gauche: Paris as a Site of Avant-​Garde Art and Cultural Exchange in the 1920s (Amsterdam: Rodopi, 2010), p. 86. The same can be said of the other pre-​war novels. 22 Rhys, After Leaving Mr Mackenzie, p. 96. 23 Ibid., p. 17. 24 Kevin Aho talks of ‘moods as disclosive’: ‘For the existentialists, we do not gain knowledge of the human situation through detached thought or rational demonstration but through the affective experiences of the individual. We understand what

in The Existential drinker
Abstract only
Thomas Osborne

and dialectical theorist, Adorno the follower of Hegel – and of Kant – rather than simply of Marx, and, of course, Adorno the avant-garde musicologist and die-hard enemy of jazz. But this is also not just a more difficult Adorno, it is the same Adorno – if an at times alarmingly intemperate, opinionated, miserable, fatalistic, utterly uncompromising Adorno. But this is not least of what is good about his work – its educational possibilities. Miserabilism and hope The overriding impression most people have on first encountering Adorno’s thought is

in The structure of modern cultural theory
On the sociological paradoxes of weak dialectical formalism and embedded neoliberalism
Darrow Schecter

reconciliation.23 This is partially explainable by the fact that critical theory was initially articulated in response to the debacle of Marxist theory in Soviet practice, and the failures of a number of avant-​garde aesthetic projects, such as Dada and surrealism, for example, to move beyond liberal democracy by synthesising the spheres of aesthetic experience, polit­ ical organisation, and pedagogical experimentation. Admittedly, the aesthetic avant-​garde of this period rarely, if ever, took seriously the proposal that this Dilemmas of contemporary statehood 149

in Critical theory and sociological theory
Thomas Osborne

the modernist avant-gardes, Greenberg regarded this development as tied to the pursuit of critique. Modernist painting, for instance, is concerned with the critique of the existing conventions of painting. Cavell takes up this idea but modifies Greenberg’s emphasis on there being any essential vocation to painting, for instance to do with the flatness of the painted surface, but he might be said to preserve the essence of Greenberg’s own argument. 23 For Cavell, modernist painting is the ongoing interrogation of conventions in painting. Modernist painters, in so

in The structure of modern cultural theory
Abstract only
Democratic state, capitalist society, or dysfunctional differentiation?
Darrow Schecter

possibility of confronting ruling class ideas with more stringent ideas presupposed hierarchical structures of power and authority particular to segmented societies. In the era prior to pervasive FD, trenchant critique appeared to depend on the existence of an almost intrinsically critical and avant-​garde perspective voiced from outside of the main institutional mediations between the hegemonic and subordinate cultures and classes in the public sphere and civil society, such as unions, parties, universities, the mainstream media, and the like. The first generation of

in Critical theory and sociological theory