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Auteurship and exploitation in the history of punk cinema
Bill Osgerby

, that outside of a handful of movies either ‘recording what happened or attempting to express the spirit of punk’, the movement ‘did not have widespread effects on other films, musicals or otherwise’.4 But other writers recognise a more significant punk presence at the cinema. In their incisive guide to cult films, for example, J. Hoberman and Jonathan Rosenbaum highlight a wide range of both commercially produced and avant-garde movies that either feature punk or are influenced by its sensibilities.5 And, in their monumental ‘complete guide to punks on film’, Zack

in Fight back
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Shivdeep Grewal

of improvement that does have a direction but is not teleologically limited in advance. (Habermas, 1997a : 146-8) For Adorno, the artistic avant-garde that arose in mid nineteenth-century Europe was quintessentially expressive of the spirit of modernity. Certainly, it crowned the liberation of scientific and moral-legal judgements that had already been set in motion by the Renaissance and Enlightenment. This aesthetic mentality was initially evident in the works of Baudelaire and Poe, reaching its

in Habermas and European integration
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Shivdeep Grewal

the nature of a thing; it signifies instead a process of improvement that does have a direction but is not teleologically limited in advance. (Habermas, 1997a: 146) For Adorno, the artistic avant-garde that arose in mid nineteenth-century Europe was quintessentially expressive of the spirit of modernity. Certainly, it crowned the liberation of scientific and moral-legal judgements that had already been set in motion by the Renaissance and Enlightenment. This aesthetic mentality was initially evident in the works of Baudelaire and Poe, reaching its ‘zenith’ with

in Habermas and European Integration (second edition)
Open Access (free)
Stirner, anarchy, subjectivity and the art of living
John Moore

practices, poetic discourse corresponds, in its effects, in terms of the subject, to revolution in the socioeconomic order’ (in Payne, 1993: 165). Historically, commencing with the texts of Lautréamont and Mallarmé in the last third of the nineteenth century, Kristeva discerns in the work of certain avant-garde writers a shift in emphasis towards the deliberate creation of genotexts which, by actuating the revolutionary potential inherent in poetic discourse, brings about a revolution in poetic language. This kind of avant-garde text ‘may be interpreted as an affirmation

in Changing anarchism
Social and cultural modernity beyond the nation-state
Author: Shivdeep Grewal

German philosopher Jürgen Habermas has written extensively on the European Union. This is the only in-depth account of his project. Published now in a second edition to coincide with the celebration of his ninetieth birthday, a new preface considers Habermas’s writings on the eurozone and refugee crises, populism and Brexit, and the presidency of Emmanuel Macron.

Placing an emphasis on the conception of the EU that informs Habermas’s political prescriptions, the book is divided into two main parts. The first considers the unfolding of 'social modernity' at the level of the EU. Among the subjects covered are Habermas's concept of juridification, the latter's affinities with integration theories such as neofunctionalism, and the application of Habermas's democratic theory to the EU. The second part addresses 'cultural modernity' in Europe – 'Europessimism' is argued to be a subset of the broader cultural pessimism that assailed the project of modernity in the late twentieth century, and with renewed intensity in the years since 9/11.

Interdisciplinary in approach, this book engages with European/EU studies, critical theory, political theory, international relations, intellectual history, comparative literature, and philosophy. Concise and clearly written, it will be of interest to students, scholars and professionals with an interest in these disciplines, as well as to a broader readership concerned with the future of Europe

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9/11 as architectural catastrophe and the hypermodernity of Terror
Julian Reid

architectural avant-garde that has since pursued another, nonorthogonal, antivertical vision for the city. In doing so, it declared ‘a state of war’ upon these ‘aberrant’ architectural forms (Parent 1997: ix). The argument that I will make in this chapter, then, is that to interpret the destruction of the World Trade Center in 2001 in architectural terms is to challenge prevailing understandings of its significance and symbolic value. An attack which liberal critics such as Elshtain argue to have been perpetrated by individuals incapable of humanity becomes recontextualised

in The biopolitics of the war on terror
Richard Cleminson

de Historia de las universidades hispánicas (Valencia, septiembre 2005), vol. II (Valencia: Universitat de València, 2008), pp. 43–60, argue that thought on degeneration was used by the labour movement as a metaphor of fin-de-siècle decline caused by capitalism. 12 Roger-Henri Guerrand and Francis Ronsin, Jeanne Humbert et la lutte pour le contrôle des naissances (Paris: Spartacus, 2001); Richard D. Sonn, Sex, Violence, and the Avant-Garde: Anarchism in Interwar France (University Park, PA: Pennsylvania State University Press, 2010), pp. 117–133; Richard Cleminson

in Anarchism and eugenics
Shivdeep Grewal

Dissociating themselves from modernity, with perhaps the exception of its aesthetic avant-garde , these movements at times blur the distinctions between left and right. Indeed, they rival their nineteenth-century predecessors in the extent to which precapitalist forms of life inspire their decreasingly Marxian, anticapitalism (Habermas, 1995 : 393). Some have come to supplement, and even replace, socialist ideas with varieties of ‘anarchical mysticism’ (Mendieta, 2002 : 1). 5 Mystical and millenarian views have also been adopted on

in Habermas and European integration
Shivdeep Grewal

Dissociating themselves from modernity, with perhaps the exception of its aesthetic avant-garde, these movements at times blur the distinctions between left and right. Indeed, they rival their nineteenth-century predecessors in the extent to C  74 which precapitalist forms of life inspire their, decreasingly Marxian, anticapitalism (Habermas, 1995: 393). Some have come to supplement, and even replace, socialist ideas with varieties of ‘anarchical mysticism’ (Mendieta, 2002: 1).5 Mystical and millenarian views have also been adopted on the radical right

in Habermas and European Integration (second edition)
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Modernity, welfare state and Eutopia
Shivdeep Grewal

natural scientific explanations of human affairs – some of whom have been influenced by the aesthetic avant-garde, counterculture or other neo-Nietzschean orientations – are then approached. Among them are writers such as Michel Houellebecq, 6 J.G. Ballard and Ernst jünger, and academics such as Peter Sloterdijk, John Gray and Samuel Huntington. This section continues with reflection on arguably the purest political incarnation of this tendency to appear in the early twenty-first century: the maverick Dutch politician Pim

in Habermas and European integration