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Abstract only
Peter Beilharz

modernism and the avant-garde, and its eventual exhaustion. Even in Australia there had been avant-gardes, and discussion of the postmodern into the 1940s at the hand of Bernard Smith, our most important and pioneering art historian. 3 There was cultural traffic between centres and peripheries, and it flowed both ways, even if unevenly. Sometimes we in the Antipodes might even lead in innovation. There were cultural riches in the ‘Big World’, but also closer to hand. There was, in short, a wealth of wisdom and culture that was on tap in Melbourne, and Sydney, and

in Intimacy in postmodern times
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Ian Goodyer

some extent by RAR’s supporters, who have been keen to stress the critical distance between themselves and a leftwing milieu which typically rejected any accommodation with the products of ‘Americanised’ popular culture. Whilst this view contains strong elements of truth, we must also appreciate that RAR was not totally unprecedented. It was a movement with a distinct lineage, and it drew inspiration from various cultural and political precursors, including intro.indd 2 6/5/2009 10:56:37 AM Introduction 3 early twentieth-century cultural avant-gardes, some of

in Crisis music
Peter Beilharz

not wait, they rushed ahead to the land of modern values fulfilled – they were avant-garde , the forward units capturing footholds for the rest of the army to advance (they – like Smith himself – wrote manifestoes, a typically modernist need and urge). None of these characteristics holds today, though. There is no avant-garde without an army to follow, and there are no forward units without a clear idea where exactly the ‘forward’ is. Modernism was a particular, time-bound form of innovation and critique – not its only conceivable form, and certainly not an

in Intimacy in postmodern times
Lenore T. Ealy

and political reformers to which others were returning for inspiration after the Second World War. ‘What looks, to those who have “joined” an avant-garde, like a wholly new program’, wrote Shils, ‘is never as comprehensively new as they imagine’ (1981a: 39–40). In contrast to the modern avant-garde, Shils sought to confront the reality that we are always ‘in the grip of the past’: If we could imagine a society in which each generation created all that it used, contemplated, enjoyed, and suffered, we would be imagining a society unlike any which has ever existed. It

in The calling of social thought
Abstract only
The new politics of loungification
Damian O’Doherty

Manchester: Shaping the City (MCC 2004), published by the Royal Institute of British Architects in collaboration with ‘Manchester City Collaboration’. As he sits down again I flick through the pages and find a smorgasbord of publicity images and photographs, renovated city centre districts, cafes and bars, clubs, art, music, all showcasing and promoting the city of Manchester. Alongside marketing copywriters these publications contained text and images from commissioned artists and writers once considered counter-culture and certainly ‘fringe’ and avant-garde in terms of

in Realising the city
Ian Goodyer

on Dick Hebdige’s highly influential analysis of the subculture, Gary Clarke notes: This metropolitan centeredness contradicts Hebdige’s emphasis on working-class creativity, since most of the punk creations that are discussed were developed among the art-school avant-garde, rather than emanating ‘from the dance halls and housing estates.’ Hebdige’s vision of punk is extremely elitist; despite punk’s proletarian stance (constantly emphasized), his concern is typically for the ‘art’ of the innovators[.]18 In a similar vein, Helen Reddington cautions against

in Crisis music
Ali Rattansi

positing that a promulgation of relativism is a ‘moral duty of contemporary intellectuals’ (Legislators: 128–9, my emphasis). It is important to bear this advocacy in mind, for it will be necessary to return to it when discussing Bauman’s subsequent attempts to distance himself from the idea of the postmodern. Art, once again, provides for Bauman the template for postmodernity. While modernist art was constantly launching new movements with ever more avant garde manifestos, hoping always to explore another and further truth, for postmodern art – and here Bauman takes

in Bauman and contemporary sociology
Why some of us push our bodies to extremes
Author: Jenny Valentish

This book is about people willing to do the sorts of things that most others couldn't, shouldn't or wouldn't. While there are all sorts of reasons why people consume substances, the author notes that there are those who treat drug-taking like an Olympic sport, exploring their capacity to really push their bodies, and frankly, wanting to be the best at it. Extreme athletes, death-defiers and those who perform incredible stunts of endurance have been celebrated throughout history. The most successful athletes can compartmentalise, storing away worry and pain in a part of their brain so it does not interfere with their performance. The brain releases testosterone, for a boost of strength and confidence. In bondage, discipline, sadism and masochism (BDSM) play, the endogenous opioid system responds to the pain, releasing opioid peptides. It seems some of us are more wired than others to activate those ancient biological systems, be it through being caned in a dungeon during a lunchbreak or climbing a sheer rock wall at the weekend. Back in 1990, sociologist Stephen Lyng coined the term 'edgework', now frequently used in BDSM circles, as 'voluntary pursuit of activities that involve a high potential for death, physical injury, or spiritual harm'.

Orian Brook, Dave O’Brien, and Mark Taylor

relationship between our unequal social hierarchies and cultural tastes. Culture and inequality also manifests in the way we think about categories of art and culture. 2 Inequality is present in the language of elite and mass, avant-garde and popular, low-, middle-, and high-brow. Culture and inequality is institutionalised in what states fund and support, and what they leave to markets, communities, and individuals to sustain. 3 This chapter asks about these relationships. Becca was, in many ways, right to be depressed. As social scientists have long demonstrated, there

in Culture is bad for you
Open Access (free)
Élisabeth Anstett and Jean-Marc Dreyfus

sense to what is a real moral and aesthetic crisis regarding representation of violence.17 Whether the subject is Bosnia, with the work of Sabina Subasic;18 Spain, with the work of José Luis Peñafuerte or the photographer Clemente Bernad;19 Latin America, with the work of Virginia Martinez;20 Rwanda, in the films of Philippe Van Leeuw and Marie-​Violaine Brincard;21 or Cambodia, including the enormously important work of Riti Panh,22 documentary-​makers remain, in this respect, in the avant-​garde of representations of extreme violence, in terms of both expressing and

in Human remains in society