Search results

You are looking at 1 - 8 of 8 items for :

  • "avant-garde" x
  • Manchester International Relations x
  • All content x
Clear All
Zalfa Feghali

queer rasquachismo 115 art historians who trace the roots of performance art to Dada’ since he sees ‘the Mexican carpa tradition and Latin American popular theatre as primary influences that developed independently from the Western avant-​garde’.56 Gómez-​Peña then has El Archeotypal Greaser reference ‘I am Joaquín’, Rodolfo Corky Gonzales’ famous epic poem, but changes the words to read: ‘Soy yo Joaqin, pero el otro /​El que se perdió when crossing the border’ [I am Joaqín, but the other one, the one who was lost when crossing the border] (Ethno-​Techno p. 221, my

in Crossing borders and queering citizenship
Abstract only
The retreat of the Serbian army and civilians in 1915–16
Danilo Šarenac

v 11 v Golgotha: the retreat of the Serbian army and civilians in 1915–16 Danilo Šarenac Introduction A passage in the novel The Sixth Day (Dan šesti), written by avant-garde Serbian author Rastko Petrović in 1935, portrays a grey wolf running through the woods in the south of the country. The wolf suddenly stops in his tracks, amazed at the sight of distant columns of men stretching as far as the eye can see. He rarely comes across human beings, so the wolf ponders what could have brought about this strange vision. The author solves the puzzle in the scene by

in Europe on the move
The Janus face of EU migration and visa policies in the neighbourhood
Igor Merheim-Eyre

amplified with regard to surveillance, migration, policing and asylum measures … for the protection of European citizens from those unwanted and uninvited “others”’ (Walters in Larner and Walters, 2006: 168). Securing the internal milieu from external threats consisted of developing a common legal base, investing in ‘avant garde’ technology, and harmonising diverging practices and views on managing cross-border flows – ‘the site of safe(r) domestic inside that is juxtaposed with a dangerous and sometimes chaotic outside’ (Walters and Haahr, 2005: 94). Interestingly, the

in The European Union and its eastern neighbourhood
Carla Konta

theatre, but this did not affect the enthusiasm they displayed in receiving it. Yugoslav audiences are grateful for the opportunity to see what is new, experimental or avant-garde and there is no question that they look primarily to the United States for this. American Embassy Belgrade on the Alvin Nikolais Dance Company tour in 1968 2 On 27 July 1954, President Eisenhower asked Congress for five million dollars of additional funds ‘to assist and encourage private musical, dramatic and other cultural groups’ in tours abroad. 3 The President’s Special

in US public diplomacy in socialist Yugoslavia, 1950–70
Andrew Carnegie’s dreamworld
Duncan Bell

elite, a political avant-​garde whose task it was to cajole and direct the ignorant masses. Forming a clerisy, they would act in concert –​either openly or in secret –​to shape public opinion. Carnegie, the self-​declared man of the people, adopted the vanguardist position. ‘We must not expect the idea to win its way at first’, he confided to his friend, the radical journalist W. T. Stead, ‘except with the finest and most intuitive minds: none the less, it is sure to come.’31 ‘A Look Ahead’ thus emerged at a propitious moment. The year 1893 saw the appearance of

in American foreign policy
Abstract only
Carla Konta

in Eastern Europe.’ 22 Indeed, conscious of the Yugoslav crucial position between the two superpowers, the regime’s policymakers used the country’s cultural avant-garde as a soft-power instrument to affirm the Yugoslav image, prestige, and value – its distinctive ‘way to socialism’ or ‘socialism with a human face’ – at the international exhibitions, festivals, and contests in the Western European cultural capitals. 23 In many notable studies pertaining to Yugoslav history, scholars have used the Yugoslav ‘exceptionalist model’ to comprehend its boundary position

in US public diplomacy in socialist Yugoslavia, 1950–70
Abstract only
Carla Konta

as their counterparts in Yugoslavia,’ whereas, earlier that month, Petrović met some American philosophers at Notre Dame University. 29 Danilo Marković and other Praxists occasionally dined with Embassy officers, intimately, as the Embassy reported, discussing the future of Praxis . Networking and open discussion inspired those meeting in the most positive way, recalled the Consulate and Embassy officials. 30 The Praxis group represented the most avant-garde and radical Marxist criticism against the LCY during its existence. Yet, despite its radicalness

in US public diplomacy in socialist Yugoslavia, 1950–70
Abstract only
(Ex)changes and drawbacks
Carla Konta

American government invited first-class cultural leaders to the United States: Mira Trajlović, dramaturg, theatre director and founder of Belgrade’s Atelje 212, renowned for its avant-garde repertoire; Josip Depolo, director of the Dubrovnik Summer Festival, who made great connections with American impresarios and music critics; and Zoran Kržišnik, director of the Modern Art Gallery in Ljubljana. The State Department recognized that ‘editors, and staff of all elements of the press, radio, and television,’ 47 were qualified, urbane enough, ‘and with ready insight into

in US public diplomacy in socialist Yugoslavia, 1950–70