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The revolutionary left and gay politics
Graham Willett

stereotypes and norms’, ‘the male dominated family’. And it proposed a seven-point programme of demands – an end to discrimination in jobs and housing, and to the treatment of homosexuality as a disease or sickness (including the use of aversion therapy), the right to free sex change and associated medical treatment, an end to exclusively heterosexual sex education in schools, the right to display affection in public places, an age of consent of 16 rather than 21, the abolition of legal discrimination including police harassment. Duncan Hallas, the National Secretary

in Against the grain
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Law reform, homosexual identity and the role of counter-culture
Lucy Robinson

, both of whom were at the conference. Generally the phrase meant a rejection of both the theories and practices of traditional Western psychiatry. Specifically, this meant a resistance to the use of medical models of mental illness and the physical methods used to treat them such as drugs, electric shock, aversion therapy and institutionalisation as well as questioning the family unit as a promoter of well-being. For the counter-culture many of the discussions at the conference offered attractive ways of thinking about politics. But, lesbians and gay men had particular

in Gay men and the Left in post-war Britain
Praxis, protest and performance
Lucy Robinson

London School of Economics (LSE), which was attended by 400 people. The GLF also took their case directly to the higher echelons of medical authority. There were zaps on the British Psychological Society Conference, and Peter Tatchell challenged the Christian London Medical Group, at its symposium on aversion therapy in November 1972.61 The Front announced itself on the political stage in campaigns that applied its critique of homosexual oppression to different institutions and the ideas behind them. The Front zapped its analysis of the law, religion and medico

in Gay men and the Left in post-war Britain
Identity, performance and the Left 1972–79
Lucy Robinson

described the rape, castration and murder of gay people in Chile. South London Gay Liberation documented internment and aversion therapy in Spain, and Argentinean newspapers’ declarations that ‘[h]omosexuals should be disposed of by bullets or cheaper means’.154 As well as bringing a different analysis and context to anti-fascism, some gay activists challenged the supremacy of left-wing organisation and strove for the third liberational stage. They voiced allegiances with other minority groups. Gays against Fascism collaborated with the Chile Solidarity Campaign.155

in Gay men and the Left in post-war Britain
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From Gay Left Collective to Greater London Council, paedophile identity and the state of the Left
Lucy Robinson

alongside individual and collective support it wanted to educate the wider world. When PIE announced its launch in the C.H.E. Bulletin, it explained that its initial goal was the organisation of information to act as a resource.68 It produced Perspectives on Paedophilia, which combined sympathetic research with an educational role, aimed at professionals who worked with paedophiles. PIE argued that, like homosexuals earlier, selfoppression and fear of the law meant that paedophiles felt they had no choice but to accept chemical castration or aversion therapy.69 PIE also

in Gay men and the Left in post-war Britain
The Bermondsey by-election, Lesbians and Gays Support the Miners and AIDS activism
Lucy Robinson

participant in the Gay Liberation Front in London (for example disrupting an aversion therapy symposium by the Christian London Medical Group in 1972). Following the Front’s fragmentation in 1973, Tatchell maintained his activism. His political concerns were by no means solely gay orientated. In 1973, Tatchell attended a youth rally in East Berlin where he was threatened with arrest after he spoke out for human rights in Russia and Eastern Europe. He worked with single homeless people, campaigned against child labour and exposed repression in Malawi. In 1978 Tatchell moved

in Gay men and the Left in post-war Britain