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Third edition
Author: Leslie C. Green

It has been accepted since antiquity that some restraint should be observed during armed conflict. This book examines the apparent dichotomy and introduces any study of the law of armed conflict by considering the nature and legality of war. The purpose of what is known as the law of armed conflict or, more commonly, the law of war is to reduce the horrors inherent therein to the greatest extent possible, bearing in mind the political purpose for which the war is fought, namely to achieve one's policies over one's enemies. The discussion on the history and sources of the law of armed conflict pays most attention to warfare on land because that is the region for which most agreements have been drawn up, although attention has been accorded to both aerial and naval warfare where it has been considered necessary. Traditionally, international law was divided into the law of war and the law of peace, with no intermediate stage between. Although diplomatic relations between belligerents are normally severed once a conflict has commenced, there remain a number of issues, not all of which are concerned with their inter-belligerent relations, which require them to remain in contact. War crimes are violations of the and customs of the law of armed conflict and are punishable whether committed by combatants or civilians, including the nationals of neutral states. The book also talks about the rights and duties of the Occupying Power, civil defence, branches of international law and prisoners of war.

A cinematic saga
François Dubuisson

The famous 1960 film Exodus , 1 by Otto Preminger, is a particularly emblematic example of the way in which cinema portrays the conflict and forges a certain representation thereof in the eyes of the general public. It relates a key moment in the genesis of the dispute, describing a series of events surrounding the end of British Mandate over Palestine and the Partition Plan adopted by the United Nations General Assembly in November 1947. 2 A scene from this film allows us to illustrate two conceptions of international law that can be conveyed by the cinema

in Cinematic perspectives on international law
Catherine Akurut

Introduction Men experience sexual violence during armed conflict situations, which affects their physical, social and psychological well-being. However, this is under-researched and under-reported ( Vojdik: 2014 : 931), and often misunderstood and mischaracterised ( Kapur and Muddell, 2016 : 4). Consequently, men who experience conflict-related sexual violence (CRSV) have been severely overlooked within the humanitarian

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Leslie C. Green

Classic position Historically, international law is concerned only with the relations between states. As a result, the law of armed conflict developed in relation to inter-state conflicts and was not in any way concerned with conflicts occurring within the territory of any state or with a conflict between an imperial power and a colonial

in The contemporary law of armed conflict
Leslie C. Green

nothing in the Charter enables the Organisation to intervene in matters essentially in the internal affairs of any state unless there is a threat to the peace, a breach of the peace or an act of aggression, in which case the United Nations is entitled to have recourse to enforcement measures in accordance with Chapter VII of the Charter. A non-international conflict has traditionally been one in

in The contemporary law of armed conflict
Leslie C. Green

General applicability of the law In the light of the preceding chapters it is possible to draw attention to what may be regarded as the basic rules and principles underlying the law of armed conflict on land, at sea or in the air. These rules and principles are applicable regardless of the legality or justness of the conflict, and even if

in The contemporary law of armed conflict
Leslie C. Green

The position in antiquity As pointed out in Chapter 1, it has been accepted since antiquity that some restraint should be observed during armed conflict. Already in the Old Testament there are instances of limitations imposed by God. Thus we read in Deuteronomy, 2 for example, that when attacking heathen tribes among the inhabitants of Canaan the

in The contemporary law of armed conflict
Leslie C. Green

substance. It becomes necessary, therefore, to examine this apparent dichotomy and to introduce any study of the law of armed conflict by considering the nature and legality of war. Before doing so, however. it is as well to bear in mind that Cicero maintained, ‘silent enim leges inter armes . . . Salus populi suprema est lex.’ 2 Clausewitz 3 even went so far as to assert

in The contemporary law of armed conflict
Hakim Khaldi

of projects in the north-west and north-east and in Qabassin – under ISIL control at the time. I cross-referenced my analyses with those of other researchers and journalists covering the Syrian conflict. My aim in this article is to describe the operations conducted by MSF France in four distinct areas of Syria from 2011 to 2018 during the country’s civil war: the governorates of Idlib and Aleppo, controlled by different rebel groups; the north-east, administered by the

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
A Congolese Experience
Justine Brabant

Introduction What is the logic governing journalistic practices in armed conflict contexts? 1 There are obvious physical constraints that make it difficult for sociologists and anthropologists to directly observe reporters working in war zones or areas of armed conflict. And while it is no substitute for direct observation, I would like to share my own experience of the multiple constraints that journalists face in crisis zones and of the

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs