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Michael Staunton

immediate eruption of conflict upon Thomas’s elevation to Canterbury, Herbert’s version is also guilty of distortion. He passes over the danger to the relationship between archbishop and king caused by Thomas’s claiming of royal castles and his antagonising of the king’s tenants-in-chief. The description of the council of Tours is highly selective

in The lives of Thomas Becket
Abstract only
C. E. Beneš

the western Mediterranean brought it into military and economic conflict with the Muslim empires of north Africa and Spain, while its major contributions to the First Crusade (especially at Antioch, Jerusalem, and Caesarea) brought it great wealth and gave its merchants favoured status in the new crusader state. 31 The Genoese later played major roles in the Second, Third, Fifth, and Seventh Crusades as well. In

in Jacopo Da Varagine’s Chronicle of the city of Genoa
Gervase Rosser

economy expanded to its limits, a series of clashes over municipal jurisdiction sprang from a clear economic motivation. A significant element in these conflicts was often resentment of the legal immunities enjoyed by the Church. At the beginning of that period, the leading cloth-workers and merchants of such a borough as Bury St Edmunds, which had grown up as a small market to service the monastic community, were

in Towns in medieval England
Selected sources
Author: Gervase Rosser

This book is the first collection of translated sources on towns in medieval England between 1100 and 1500. Drawing on a variety of written evidence for the significan and dynamic period, it provides an overview of English medieval urban history. Readers are invited to consider the challenges and opportunities presented by a wide range of sources. The merchant, for example, is seen from different angles - as an economic agent, as a religious patron and in Chaucer's fictional depiction. The prominence of London and the other major cities is reflected in the selection, but due attention is also given to a number of small market towns. Occasions of conflict are represented, as are examples of groups and societies which both contributed to and helped to contain the tensions within urban society. Changing indicators of wealth and poverty are considered, together with evidence for more complex questions concerning the quality of life in the medieval town. The book moves between the experience of urban life and contemporary perceptions of it - from domestic furnishings to legends of civic origins and plays in which townspeople enacted their own history.

C. E. Beneš

. Chapter two: Regarding Ugo, the second archbishop. Ugo, the second archbishop, took office in the year of the Lord 1163 and completed twenty-five years in the archiepiscopate. 36 He was first archdeacon and was afterward elected to the archbishopric. He was a man of great wisdom; when a certain conflict between the Avvocati and the di Castello ( de Castro ) caused many slayings, he led them back to peace by his

in Jacopo Da Varagine’s Chronicle of the city of Genoa
C. E. Beneš

Genoa. Then, because at that time there was great discord and conflict between the Genoese and the Pisans, the aforesaid pope went to Corneto, where he ordered the Genoese and the Pisans to send him official ambassadors with full negotiating power. And when the ambassadors came to Corneto, the pope reconciled them one to another. 11 He also sent [a message] to Siro, the bishop of Genoa, summoning him into

in Jacopo Da Varagine’s Chronicle of the city of Genoa
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Gervase Rosser

decades, and on which a preliminary comment is called for here. To awaken our interest in the past, there is no stimulus so powerful as a period of destruction. After the end of the Second World War, the sites of bomb damage remained for years, for lack of resources, as testimony to the recent conflict. To some of these melancholy places there came, at the end of each working day, crowds of Londoners who queued to see

in Towns in medieval England
C. E. Beneš

between them so that he could escape them, and said in a loud voice that he believed in the resurrection, and that he had been arrested for this belief. When the Pharisees, who believed in the resurrection, heard this, they said that they did not wish Paul to suffer any harm. The Sadducees, on the other hand, said that he should die. A great dispute thus arose between them, and so Paul escaped from their clutches. This conflict was good because

in Jacopo Da Varagine’s Chronicle of the city of Genoa
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Mayke de Jong and Justin Lake

considerable resistance, both within Corbie and outside. When the second book was added, however, Radbert was no longer abbot, and even though the conflicts that led to his ‘retirement’ are not entirely clear, he did not step down entirely of his own volition. 27 His own career now resembled that of his beloved Arsenius, who had been exiled from Corbie and Louis’ court. Although Radbert never attained Wala’s elevated social and political status, as abbot of Corbie he had been part of the leadership of the kingdom of Charles the Bald. Once this came to an end, fiction and

in Confronting crisis in the Carolingian empire
C. E. Beneš

discord between me and you is your judges and lawyers. If you wish me to withdraw from your [city], give me six of the wisest judges and lawyers among you, whom I will choose; I will take them with me as hostages and leave you in peace’. When Demosthenes, that wisest of orators, had heard this he spoke to the people, saying, ‘There was great conflict for a long time between the wolves and the shepherds. Then the wolves said to the shepherds: “The

in Jacopo Da Varagine’s Chronicle of the city of Genoa