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Wood reads Philip Sidney’s New Arcadia in the light of the ethos known as Philippism, after the followers of Philip Melanchthon the Protestant theologian. He employs a critical paradigm previously used to discuss Sidney’s Defence of Poesy and narrows the gap that critics have found between Sidney’s theory and literary practice. This book is a valuable resource for scholars and researchers in the fields of literary and religious studies.

Various strands of philosophical, political and theological thought are accommodated within the New Arcadia, which conforms to the kind of literature praised by Melanchthon for its examples of virtue. Employing the same philosophy, Sidney, in his letter to Queen Elizabeth and in his fiction, arrogates to himself the role of court counsellor. Robert Devereux also draws, Wood argues, on the optimistic and conciliatory philosophy signified by Sidney’s New Arcadia.

James Doelman

pattern in which Prince Henry himself had been poisoned (by Overbury, no less), who was in turn the victim of a justly deserved poisoning. 11 English military actions of the 1620s The two significant military spheres for 1620s Britain were the various campaigns to reclaim the Palatinate and Bohemia for Elector Frederick, and the conflicts with France

in The daring muse of the early Stuart funeral elegy
John Derricke versus Edmund Spenser
Brian C. Lockey

relation to Edward III’s invasion of France and Scotland, but once again there is no mention of his second son, Lionel’s invasion of Ireland towards the end of Edward III’s reign. 26 Derricke’s emphasis on long-standing English claims of sovereignty over Ireland gives way to a discussion of Ireland as the site of protracted religious conflict. In contrast to Spenser’s emphasis on secular reformation, Derricke’s tract presents Ireland as the locus of bitter conflicts over religious faith and adherence to the

in John Derricke’s The Image of Irelande: with a Discoverie of Woodkarne
Open Access (free)
Personal Shakespeare
Steve Sohmer

. And those early auditors had a stupendous advantage over even the best-informed of us: they breathed in the same milieu as Shakespeare and were alert to the same events, trends, personalities, conflicts, scandals, rumours, slang, parlour games, capers, larks, and jokes. What wouldn’t a modern scholar give to attend the Bankside Globe one drizzly May afternoon in 1600 to hear

in Reading Shakespeare’s mind
Mythographic complexities in 1 Iron Age
Charlotte Coffin

, and invites us to highlight Heywood’s engagement with Caxton’s Recuyell alongside his reading of Homer or Ovid. While book historians have begun to make a place for Caxton in literary history, literary scholars have yet to explore early modern playwrights’ engagements with Recuyell : the two parts that follow are a step in that direction. Hindsight and foresight My contention is that Heywood inherited from Caxton a specifically medieval perspective on the Trojan conflict, and developed it into an ironic play on hindsight and foresight. In his chapter on

in Thomas Heywood and the classical tradition
Abstract only
James Doelman

on the renowned military leader Sir Horace Vere (d. 1635) in 1642 must be connected with the conflicts between Parliament and king emerging at that time. My final chapter offered some discussion of one element of the elegies on Anne King; however, this richly interconnected group of poems deserves far more attention, especially with its emphasis upon the bodily Resurrection, which connects them

in The daring muse of the early Stuart funeral elegy
Abstract only
James Doelman

-conscious genre in the first decade of James’ reign, with influential funeral elegies by John Donne and Francis Beaumont, and the massive outpouring of poems on the death of Prince Henry in 1612. 44 The terminal date marks the last year before the conflicts of the 1640s significantly changed the dynamics of such a potentially political form as the elegy. In that decade, many elegies were written about men who

in The daring muse of the early Stuart funeral elegy
William O’Neil

conflict ( Plate VII ), defeats his opponent in battle ( Plate IX ), returns to Dublin to the thankful appreciation of the Lord Mayor and aldermen ( Plate X ), and through these actions inspires the submission of Turlough Luineach O’Neill ( Plate XII ). In the verse narrative itself, Derricke offers a second ending to his work, one that makes Sir Henry blameless for his failure to bring civility to Ireland: in a striking anticlimax, in a monologue that purports to be both confessional and penitent, the Irish rebel Rorie Oge O

in John Derricke’s The Image of Irelande: with a Discoverie of Woodkarne
Martial identities and the subject of conquest in Derricke’s Image of Irelande
Maryclaire Moroney

demobilisation of troops, contributed to and prolonged the conflicts endemic in the period. 6 Frequently short of supplies and behind in pay, English forces in Ireland were ‘notoriously ill-disciplined and prone to desertion’. 7 Equally notorious were the English captains, supported by government officials (including Sidney) in the expectation that they would maintain some level of order at the least cost to the Crown; officers were permitted to cheat their troops of food, pay, and equipment, and to extort funds from

in John Derricke’s The Image of Irelande: with a Discoverie of Woodkarne
William Douglas’ funeral elegy on the Second Earl of Lothian
James Doelman

father was raised to an earldom, Robert took over his role as Master of Requests, and in 1609 he succeeded his father as Second Earl. The family seat was Newbattle (or ‘Newbottle’) south of Edinburgh, which had been converted from a sacred to a secular institution over the final decades of the sixteenth century. Conflict over the estate seemed to follow quickly upon the First Earl’s death: his will had

in The daring muse of the early Stuart funeral elegy