Search results

You are looking at 1 - 7 of 7 items for :

  • "diplomacy" x
  • Archaeology and Heritage x
  • All content x
Clear All
Anthony Alan Shelton

circulated outside of the region, in this case in Belgium and the Netherlands (1993–1994).24 These tours were sponsored by the Peruvian or Colombian governments and coincided with major cultural initiatives,25 which acted as ‘intricate, multilayered engines of global diplomacy’.26 These spectacular blockbuster exhibitions, from their lenders’ points of view, attempted to garner national prestige, project a glorious past, reassert culture as the cornerstone of national identity and promote commercial interest, thereby making them an integral part of soft diplomacy

in Curatopia
Open Access (free)
Antonín Salač and the French School at Athens
Thea De Armond

, 2003: 1–16). Since the 1990s, studies of nationalism and archaeology – essentially, ‘geographies of knowledge’ at the scale of the nation-state – have flourished (see e.g. Kohl and Fawcett, 1995; Díaz-Andreu and Champion, 1996; Meskell, 1998). If archaeology builds nation-states at home, so, too, might it negotiate for nation-states abroad; hence, the study of the entanglement of archaeology with cultural diplomacy (see Luke and Kersel, 2012). This chapter is a contribution to the latter area of enquiry. As we shall see, the scholarly networks Salač cultivated with

in Communities and knowledge production in archaeology
Roger Forshaw

-born Egyptians once again fully controlled the country. From its early ‘Libyan’ roots the Kingdom of the West expanded the territory under its control, and then Psamtek I, the first ruler of the 26th Dynasty, went on to reunify Egypt, a process which he seemingly achieved largely through the saite era diplomatic means. Indeed, an important aspect of the Saite Period in general was to favour diplomacy over the use of military force. Psamtek re-established central government, which in time achieved stability for the country, after the previous periods of political fragmentation

in Egypt of the Saite pharaohs, 664–525 BC
Open Access (free)
The first Dutch excavation in Italy, 1952–58
Arthur Weststeijn and Laurien de Gelder

/12/2019 08:56 Digging dilettanti73 Italo-Dutch cultural collaboration (Cools and De Valk, 2004: 88–96). The conditions for starting a Dutch excavation in Italy, academic as well as political, had never been this favourable. Starting an excavation abroad: academic diplomacy between Rome and The Hague On 6 March 1947, Vermaseren guided a small Dutch delegation through the rooms of the mithraeum underneath the Santa Prisca church on the Aventine hill (Mededelingen van het Nederlands Instituut te Rome (MNIR) [26] 1950: xx).The cult site for the deity Mithras had been partly

in Communities and knowledge production in archaeology
Reunification of Egypt
Roger Forshaw

after coming to the throne that Psamtek set about exerting his hegemony over the other Delta states. The Delta was an area where political unity had collapsed and principalities of Libyan origin ruled by the ‘Great chiefs of Ma’ (wrw aA n Ma) were now the prominent model. How Psamtek achieved control over the other Delta states is not completely certain, although it is recognised that he favoured diplomacy over the use of military force but negotiations could well have been supported by the threat or use of military action.28 This expansion of the Saite state can be

in Egypt of the Saite pharaohs, 664–525 BC
Jes Wienberg

initiatives for protection and preservation across nations as early as the decades after 1870, a period characterised by colonial great powers of which the British Empire was the greatest. Alongside a gradual professionalisation and the building up of protection and preservation at national level, there were also international contacts, especially in the Church, the universities, and the world of diplomacy (Hall 2011 ). The emergence of antiquarian protection and preservation can also be traced back to the Enlightenment ideas of a public sphere and to reactions against

in Heritopia
Civil war to prosperity
Roger Forshaw

sculpture. Cyprus was later conquered by the Persians at the end of the Saite Period in 525 BC. Again, like his predecessors, Ahmose put great emphasis on diplomacy, forging a number of foreign alliances intended to support his country’s interests. Cyrene, the state that had played a major part in the downfall of Haaibra, now became an ally of Egypt, perhaps fostered by Ahmose having chosen a Cyrenean bride in order to forge political links.60 He formed an alliance with Croesus of Lydia who was himself allied with Sparta and Nabonidus of Babylon.61 He had close

in Egypt of the Saite pharaohs, 664–525 BC