Search results

Arjun Claire

been conceived as a triumph of reason and rationality over emotions. To the extent it relies on emotions, it carefully directs them through curated narratives deployed in the realisation of predetermined advocacy objectives ( Fernandes, 2017 : 2). With humanitarian actors increasingly engaging in specific thematic issues and policy changes, they have privileged authoritative facts that positions them as experts, enhancing their legitimacy in the eyes of decision

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Humanity and Solidarity
Tanja R. Müller and Róisín Read

-called evidence-based advocacy, that seems to leave little room for emotion and compassion, in similar ways has disempowered affected populations and ignored their aspirations. In demonstrating the various forms these real or imagined tensions between reason and emotion have taken in the history of témoignage , the article advances the argument that témoignage still has the potential to show real solidarity with affected populations and take their own life worlds and aspirations seriously – and in doing

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
German Responses to the June 2019 Mission of the Sea-Watch 3
Klaus Neumann

Mission Lifeline’s Lifeline , who was tried in a Maltese court in 2018–19, seemed to be in a much better position to appeal to mainstream Germans, being middle-aged, male and a self-confessed conservative who used to vote for the Christian Social Union; however, his court case had not attracted nearly as much attention as Rackete’s. Third, particularly vulnerable, innocent and/or deserving victims, whose mediatised suffering often prompts an outpouring of public emotion, were never the focus of the narrative about the Sea-Watch 3 . By the time the boat entered the

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Sean Healy and Victoria Russell

that novel information is both more surprising and more valuable to the one who possesses it. A further explanation for the more rapid spread of falsehoods is connected to the emotions it evokes: not only greater surprise but also greater disgust, while truth more evokes stronger emotions of sadness, anticipation, joy and trust. As a result, even ideas which might once have been considered ‘fringe’ or ‘extreme’ can benefit mightily in the current

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Governing Precarity through Adaptive Design
Mark Duffield

modernism. Computers would, it was argued, allow the design capabilities and expertise of professionals to be transferred to the popular masses ( Turner, 2006 ). In the mid 1970s, the architect Nicholas Negroponte 11 sought to eliminate professional privilege by facilitating public participation and ownership of the architectural design process through computer programming. The intention was to create ‘soft architectural machines’ that could translate human imperfections, anxieties and emotions into the rich architectural designs of a ‘new

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Middle-Aged Syrian Women’s Contributions to Family Livelihoods during Protracted Displacement in Jordan
Dina Sidhva, Ann-Christin Zuntz, Ruba al Akash, Ayat Nashwan, and Areej Al-Majali

York : Berghahn Books ). Ozkaleli , U. ( 2018 ), ‘ Displaced Selves, Dislocated Emotions and Transforming Identities: Syrian Refugee Women Reinventing Selves ’, Women’s Studies International Forum , 70 , 17 – 23 . Rabho , L. A. ( 2015

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Author: Sara De Vido

The book explores the relationship between violence against women on one hand, and the rights to health and reproductive health on the other. It argues that violation of the right to health is a consequence of violence, and that (state) health policies might be a cause of – or create the conditions for – violence against women. It significantly contributes to feminist and international human rights legal scholarship by conceptualising a new ground-breaking idea, violence against women’s health (VAWH), using the Hippocratic paradigm as the backbone of the analysis. The two dimensions of violence at the core of the book – the horizontal, ‘interpersonal’ dimension and the vertical ‘state policies’ dimension – are investigated through around 70 decisions of domestic, regional and international judicial or quasi-judicial bodies (the anamnesis). The concept of VAWH, drawn from the anamnesis, enriches the traditional concept of violence against women with a human rights-based approach to autonomy and a reflection on the pervasiveness of patterns of discrimination (diagnosis). VAWH as theorised in the book allows the reconceptualisation of states’ obligations in an innovative way, by identifying for both dimensions obligations of result, due diligence obligations, and obligations to progressively take steps (treatment). The book eventually asks whether it is not international law itself that is the ultimate cause of VAWH (prognosis).

Vincent Chapaux

, Robot . 50 In the movie, a police detective will slowly understand that the robots forced to work for the human race can feel certain emotions and are capable of exercising free choice. Once this realization occurs, the hero will feel an acute moral obligation to stop treating them as slaves. Finally, Blade Runner 51 can also be read as a plea against interspecies slavery. The movie tells the story of a hero in charge of ‘retiring’ (killing) bioengineered humans called replicants who escape their condition of slavery. The movie quickly moves from an

in Cinematic perspectives on international law
Abstract only
Gender trouble in Siddiq Barmak’s Osama
Gabrielle Simm

French, another meaning of genre is gender. In Western film studies, genres have long been recognized to be associated with particular genders. In her 1991 article, Linda Williams argues that low-brow films mostly ignored by academia, which she terms ‘body films’, make a spectacle of the (usually female) body caught in the grip of excess emotion, whether sexual arousal, fear or sadness. 6 Such body films are gendered in relation to their target audiences. So melodramas or ‘weepies’ have a target audience of women; pornography, of men, and horror films, adolescents

in Cinematic perspectives on international law
Necroethics and rights in a world of shit
Mario Prost

difficulty in treating films as the product of a single, consistent creative intelligence putting forward a coherent set of ideas or arguments. More often than not, films raise issues for audiences to think about, frequently coming across as ambivalent and drawing attention to complex emotions, dilemmas, contradictions rather than articulating a fixed view. Films often work as thought experiments do, i.e. as devices of the imagination used to investigate the nature of things. Most of the films analysed by Fałkowska-Clarys and Koutroulis in their chapter on the principle of

in Cinematic perspectives on international law