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Gervase Rosser

. 14 J. Haemers, ‘A moody community? Emotion and ritual in late medieval urban revolts’, in E. Lecuppre-Desjardin and A.-L. Van Bruaene (eds), Emotions in the Heart of the City (14 th –16 th Centuries) , Turnhout, 2005, pp. 63–81. 15 S. K. Cohn, Popular

in Towns in medieval England
C. E. Beneš

a lady ( femina ) but rather a she-bear or leopardess. For women are naturally cold and wet [in their humours] so they are more susceptible to emotion, while men are naturally hot and dry, so they do not suffer or feel compassion as easily. 57 Therefore on the death of a son his mother grieves more than his father, because men have bolder hearts; they desire and love greater and more lofty things. Solomon

in Jacopo Da Varagine’s Chronicle of the city of Genoa
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Mayke de Jong and Justin Lake

yourself are believed to be more alive to us now. Tears now become sweet and weeping a source of joy, 115 because even though death is hateful, loving you is life to us. For death has been drunk down and swallowed up in life, 116 and for this reason you live, father, and live a blessed existence. We ask for your assistance before the one with whom you live in a better state, in whom all things live, and in whom we exist and are moved. [p. 28] For by the promises of this hope the soul’s ardour is cooled and emotion, relaxed for a time, is dissipated. 117 Thus I ask

in Confronting crisis in the Carolingian empire
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Mayke de Jong and Justin Lake

sanctioned (by the testimony of three witnesses, as it were), 4 and so that our lament will not be found different even in the number of participants. Therefore, brother, since it was your idea that we should start all over again, it should be your responsibility to choose our companion in this task. Adeodatus: Although I am scarcely capable of discerning judgement, as a devoted follower of your commands I will not refuse what you ask. For with reason we are not looking for a philosopher for our lament, but for one of those whose pious remembrance or emotion will move

in Confronting crisis in the Carolingian empire
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Rachel Stone and Charles West

also potentially involved personal bonds of affection and desire between a husband and wife. As already mentioned, the sources speak unequivocally and often of Lothar II’s passion for Waldrada and hatred of Theutberga. Commentators like Hincmar were far from naïve – Hincmar discusses at length in De divortio the possibility of feigning emotions – but no one attempted to

in The divorce of King Lothar and Queen Theutberga
Rachel Stone and Charles West

This chapter contains the translated text ofDe divortio. It has several underlying sections, responding to the questions that Hincmar initially received. These sections were, however, further divided to make the twenty-three responses which appear in the manuscript. The original sections are as follows: the procedure at the councils of Aachen, rules on marriage, divorce and remarriage, the validity of ordeals, the next steps in Theutberga's case, the sodomy charge, Lothar's relationship with Waldrada and sorcery, Lothar's possibilities of remarriage, and the response of bishops towards appeals to them and the case of Engeltrude. De divortio also deals with seven further questions which Hincmar received six months after the first: who is able to judge the king, can the king avoid further judgement in the case, the case of Engeltrude, and the effects of communion with the king.

in The divorce of King Lothar and Queen Theutberga
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Jennifer Ward

sometimes possible to get such information from legal proceedings and more particularly from letters, but often social relationships have to be judged on the basis of factual information, whether this describes actions taken, gifts made, or mutual support offered; there is rarely any knowledge of the emotions involved. There are comparatively few records in which the voice of the woman herself can be heard. Letters and wills are

in Women of the English Nobility and Gentry, 1066-1500
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Andrew Brown and Graeme Small

themselves, and he regarded an element of social play as the basis of all cultures. 89 Nor did he deny that rituals, such as processions, might generate ‘powerful emotions’, nor yet that they might have ‘political effect’. 90 To that extent, modern approaches that analyse the effects of rituals remain in his debt; but it is the effort to remarry what Huizinga had divorced

in Court and civic society in the Burgundian Low Countries c.1420–1530
Elisabeth van Houts

parties, neither of which was superior to the other, abandoned killing by arms. Divine Providence preserved Herluin, its strong timber, for every good and useful work. The supreme Creator did not wish Herluin to be twisted any further this way and that by the violence of the world’s winds, nor be wet with tears from fruitless emotions. [C. 11] Herluin was already over thirty-seven years old and his

in The Normans in Europe
Diana Webb

proclaim with the most ardent emotion the supreme and individual Trinity, extolling it with many praises. Whence it came about a little later that one night the light went out while she was praying and three spheres appeared in her cell, brighter than the sun, which illuminated the cell far more than the material sun which we see with our bodily eyes. When she saw them, she exclaimed with great emotion, ‘O

in Saints and cities in medieval Italy